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Longevity resources: Reaching the Latino community and vice versa – Aspen Times

Estrella Portillo knows seeking immediate mental health assistance in relation to the Latino community is a big challenge.

Portillo, a 28-year-old Latina who moved to the Roaring Fork Valley from Mexico when she was 12, encountered these challenges almost immediately.

I have struggled with depression and anxiety for a long time, she said. Though she realized and understood what these mental symptoms were, there was a seemingly impenetrable stigma attached to them. Because in my family, if you have accepted that you have a mental illness, then youre weak.

The Glenwood Springs High School graduate said from adults to children, Latinos are reluctant to get the proper care and resources they need for any type of mental health issues, including substance abuse and suicide.

Im coming from a family of immigrants, and mental health is just nonexistent, she said. Its something thats not talked about in Latino families. We just brushed it under the rug.

Portillo takes classes through Naropa University in Boulder, and has recently been researching ways to foster more mental health awareness among the Hispanic community of the Roaring Fork Valley. Her research has so far uncovered barriers such as neglect, access to health insurance and language leading to significant mental health challenges.

They come here to work and have a better life for their families or themselves, and theyre running away from something major, whether it was a traumatic experience, violence, poverty, she said. And all they do here is work. They dont know how to give themselves the space and time to work on themselves emotionally.

They dont feel like they have someone that they trust, she added.

For some, theres also a language barrier.

I definitely think theres a need for more bilingual professionals, Portillo said. And everywhere, from cops to nurses to therapists to social workers and just people that are spreading awareness its not enough.

Leslie Venegas is trying to alleviate this dilemma. The bilingual Latina runs the Celebrate Recovery program in New Castle and is a peer specialist at Mind Springs Health in Glenwood Springs.

I see a lot of need from the Hispanic community, so Ive encountered a lot of people that are in need of resources, she said. Either theyre not informed, or there are not many resources available to them.

Venegas said there are simply more resources available to the English-speaking community.

And theres a lot of Hispanics that dont speak English, or they dont feel comfortable coming to somebody that doesnt come from the same background as them, because we are a different culture, she said.

Celebrate Recovery is a Christian-based, 12-step recovery program designed to help anyone struggling with hurt, pain or addiction of any kind, according to its mission stated online. Mind Springs Health, meanwhile, is Western Colorados largest provider of counseling and therapy for mental wellness.

Like Aspen Strong, Celebrate Recovery provides a 24/7 call-in service for people requesting immediate assistance, as well as additional treatment options. And with people like Venegas on the frontlines, it helps better reach the Latino community.

I pretty much meet with people that are struggling with substance use disorder, or mental health, Venegas said. Its kind of a support system to help them connect them to different people or support systems.

Were a really good resource for people, because weve been there, she added.

Reporter Ray K. Erku can be reached at 612-423-5273 or rerku@postindependent.com.

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This tech investor believes well soon live to 150. Here are his seven longevity hacks – The Irish Times

The possibility of living 150 or even 200 years is within humanitys grasp and advances in diagnostics, treatments and organ regeneration and replacement are moving this prospect ever nearer. Early death from diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes will no longer be inevitable for millions of people.

These are among the tantalising and radical ideas Sergey Young presents in his book The Science and Technology of Growing Young (published by BenBella Books).

Slowing, reversing or even ending ageing will become a universally accepted ambition in the healthcare community, he says. Technology is converging to make this a certainty. Developments in the understanding and manipulation of our genes and cells, in the development of small-scale health diagnostics and in the leveraging of data for everything from drug discovery to precision treatment of disease are radically changing how we think about healthcare and ageing, he says.

With a background in fund management and investing, Youngs own epiphany came when doctors told him that he would need to take statins for the rest of his life to control his high cholesterol. This has led him into researching the science of ageing and the frontiers of medicine and technology. His $100 million Longevity Vision Fund invests in companies at the edge of breakthroughs in life-extension technology and he is a board member of the American Federation of Aging Research.

Young insists that he is not in the business of trying to cheat death personally. Even if I die at the age of 80, which would be typical for my cohort, I want to have done so sharing the best ideas about longevity. If that benefits my children and grandchildren and society in general thats a good legacy.

With a regular regime of intensive health checks, body sensors and a rigorous diet and exercise regime, Young practises what he has learned on his journey around the bleeding edge of medical research and clearly intends maximising his own lifespan.

Though he is not a doctor, Youngs extensive research among the medical and life science community synthesised much of the best thinking on arresting ageing. His book provides a fascinating look at whats possible within both near and longer-term horizons, ranging over subjects such as gene editing, stem cell therapy, organ replacement and bionic augmentation.

If we want to life a long life, the best thing we can do right now, he says, is to be proactive about our health so we can stick around for the medical and technological advances that are coming down the tracks in next decade or so that could prevent or cure what he calls the monster diseases, such as cancer and heart disease.

That seems like an audacious claim. But take cancer, for example. Eighty years ago, there was no drug to treat it but now there are at least seven pharmaceutical approaches to cancer treatment and more than 100 chemotherapy drugs in use. Five-year survival rates from cancer have been improving by close to 2 per cent a year for the past 50 years. That rate of progress is set to explode in the years ahead, he says.

Cancer medicine right now is largely reactive, and treatment often starts too late. Young envisages a future with low-cost ubiquitous connected devices that will constantly monitor your health. Some will be external while others will be embedded under your skin. Some could be swallowed with your breakfast or remain swimming through your bloodstream at all times, monitoring your heart rate, respiration, skin secretions and free-floating DNA in your body that may indicate cancer or other diseases.

Early detection of diseases will be complemented by vastly improved drugs and treatments aided by artificial intelligence. Consider how quickly and effectively vaccines have been developed and deployed in the Covid-19 pandemic, he notes.

Then consider the issue of organ and limb replacement and regeneration. Advances in areas such as 3D printing and life science mean that a whole host of damaged or diseased body parts can be replaced. We can have new organs, grown in many cases by our own cells, mitigating the prospect that our bodies will reject them.

Add all this science and technology progress together and the prospect of breaching the current limit of human life of about 120 years, is not only feasible, but inevitable, he believes. Not alone would we live longer but we would enjoy the benefits of living healthier lives for longer too.

For many, this utopian vision raises disturbing questions. There are a whole host of moral and ethical issues here. Would the benefits of defying ageing be spread evenly across social classes and geographies? Do people really want to live a lot longer? Could the planet contain the increase the population? Would a new divide emerge between the body enhanced older population and traditionalists resistant to this form of progress?

Young responds by saying that doing nothing would be truly immoral. Existing healthcare costs are enormous, he points out. Technology offers a pathway to cheaper ubiquitous healthcare solutions that are within the grasp of everyone. Fertility rates are declining in many parts of the globe and advances in technology will result in greater sustainability in energy and food production.

A longevity revolution is on the way but it is disruptive innovators rather than Big Pharma who will lead the way, he believes. The medical establishment will ultimately embrace it as doctors are swamped with patients and outmoded treatments. Access to the best information, drugs and technology will empower doctors to provide better, more affordable and empathetic care to their patients and expensive hospital admissions could plummet.

In as little as 10 years we will look back at the treatment of ageing and disease as quite naive, Young concludes.

No smoking and restrict alcohol: Smoking is the biggest no-no for longevity for obvious reasons. High and regular use of alcohol damages your liver and pancreas, causes high blood pressure, increases your risk of stroke, brings on immune system disorders, leads to early onset Alzheimers disease and contributes to at least 200 more health conditions.

Slash sugar consumption: Excess sugar is poison, he says. It wears out the pancreas among other problems. Eliminate it wherever possible. Cut out all processed foods and limit fructose. Restrict carbs as they ultimately break down into glucose.

Fasting: Calorie reduction reduces the chances of developing health problems such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease and cognitive decline and preserves immune system function. Young recommends an intermittent fasting regime where you eat all of your meals within an eight-hour period early in the day and then refrain from eating until the next morning. Clinical data shows that intermittent fasting can improve weight loss, insulin stability, cholesterol levels.

Food as medicine: Stick to an organic, mainly plant-based diet, eliminating processed foods. Choose grass-fed free-range meat and wild caught fish. Include health fats such as extra virgin olive oil which has high anti-oxidant anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties that can help preserve cell condition and protect from a range of diseases. He also recommends the use of supplements to provide the nutrients we cant get from our foods.

Consume more water: Regular consumption of water improves resting calorie burn by up to 30 per cent and encourages you to consume less sugary and caffeine drinks. It also suppresses hunger so you will eat less.

Sleep more: Sleep deprivation significantly increases your chances of a heart attack. The link between poor sleep and cancer is so strong that the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified night-shift work as a probable carcinogen. Young says we should use every trick in the book to aid sleep including transitions rituals such as hot baths, cool bedrooms, black-out curtains, meditation and ditching digital devices at night.

Exercise: Even moderate exercise can add up to seven years to our lives, can cut cancer rates by up to 23 per cent and maintain cardio health among other benefits. Walking is a great start. Try to do 10,000 steps a day.

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This tech investor believes well soon live to 150. Here are his seven longevity hacks - The Irish Times

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Steph Curry looks to Tom Brady for inspiration in pursuit of NBA longevity – USA TODAY

NFC South preview: Can anyone beat Tom Brady and the Buccaneers?

SportsPulse: USA TODAY Sports' Mackenzie Salmon breaks down the expectations for each team in the NFC South this season.

USA TODAY

Stephen Curry wants to play basketball as long as the game still brings him joy, according to NBC Sports Monte Poole. Hes about to enter his 13th season in the NBA, all of them with Golden State after the Warriors picked the 6-foot-3 guard seventh overall in 2009.

When looking for longevity in sports, Curry knows there is no better player to study than Tom Brady.

Absolutely. Ive actually talked to him, personally, about this, Curry told NBC Sports Bay Area. Hes at the point now where he can look back and talk about that with some authority and experience.

But even he said, in the moment, when he was in his early-30s, mid-30s, late-30s, it was always, I think Ive still got two more years in me. Stay. Do everything I can to sustain yourself and stay physically and mentally sharp. And then you look up and youre saying that again, saying it in the next two years. And youre saying it again.

The 44-year-old quarterback for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers is set play in his 22nd NFL season. Hes led his teams the Bucs and the New England Patriots to 10 Super Bowl appearances and seven victories, including his most recent one this year, where he was named MVP with the Bucs.

Brady has cemented his spot in football history. He needs six more seasons to dethrone George Blanda as the NFL player with the most career seasons.

Ill know when the times right, Brady said to NBC Sports. If I cant…if Im not a championship-level quarterback, then Im not going to play. If Im a liability to the team, I mean, now way. But if I think I can win a championship, then Ill play.

Curry is looking to duplicate Bradys success, only in basketball. Earlier this month, he signed a historic four-year, $215 million extension, making him the first NBA player ever to have signed two $200 million-plus contracts. He's set to remain with the only team hes ever known through 2026.

Its dope to think about what has all transpired in the last 12 years, Curry told The Athletic about signing a new deal. Thinking about being in the Bay for another five years, taking me to 38, it checks all the boxes in terms of what Im trying to do with my career.

Last season, he was named back-to-back Player of the Month for the first time in his career. Curry already has three championship rings, leading the Warriors to wins in 2015, 2017 and 2018. On top of that, hes a seven-time All-NBA, two-time NBA MVP and won the NBA Sportsmanship Award.

Curry will look to add more to that resume, but for now, hes not thinking about retirement or whats down the road, according to NBC Sports.

Its all about staying in the moment, and not fast-forwarding, putting too much pressure on yourself to reach that milestone, he said. You do everything now to set yourself up for now and the future. Staying in the moments is all a part of getting there. So, the vision is there. But Im looking forward to the next 12 months.

Contact Alyssa Hertel at ahertel@usatoday.com or on Twitter @AlyssaHertel.

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Steph Curry looks to Tom Brady for inspiration in pursuit of NBA longevity - USA TODAY

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How to live longer: Four habits to reduce cancer and heart disease risk boosting longevity – Express

World leading longevity expert, Dr David Sinclair and author of Lifespan: Why We Age and Why We Dont Have To, shared his tips on how one can boost their longevity. Dr Sinclair is an Australian biologist with a PHD from Harvard University and shares four of his daily habit secrets which pertain to longevity. His acclaimed scientific studies have proven age reversal is possible and by incorporating certain habits into your life you could turn back the ageing clock.

Sugar and carbohydrate-rich diets have a negative impact on health independent of obesity.

Researchers discovered that the shortened survival of fruit flies fed a sugar and carbohydrate-rich diet were more prone to an early death.

Low carbohydrate dietary patterns favouring animal-derived protein and fat sources, from sources such as lamb, beef, pork, and chicken, were associated with higher mortality.

High sugar diets positively correlate with age-related diseases including diabetes and heart disease, so reducing sugar in the diet may delay ageing in humans by preventing metabolic diseases and improving general health.

Dr Sinclair advises on taking 1,000mg of Resveratrol which is an antioxidant found in red wine and certain foods.

Resveratrol has been touted as a natural way to help slow the ageing process whilst fighting cancer, obesity, heart disease and diabetes.

Dr Sinclair and colleaguesdiscovered in 2003that resveratrol could increase cell survival and slow aging in yeast (and later in mice) by activating a longevity gene known as SIRT1.

Other health benefits from resveratrol include protecting against high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and improved insulin sensitivity.

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How to live longer: Four habits to reduce cancer and heart disease risk boosting longevity - Express

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Creating snacks to combat the age-old longevity challenge and other health issues – BakeryAndSnacks.com

The pandemic has drastically changed the way consumers view their health and the impact of what they consume. As a result, the functional food market will continue its trajectory growth, estimated to burst through the $260b barrier by 2027.

Glanbia Nutritionals recent snacking habit survey conducted among 2,001 consumers in the UK by Opinion Matters in June 2021 found that 51% of over 55-year-olds will be more conscious of what they eat to stay healthy following the pandemic.

With the global population over the age of 60 reaching 22% by 2020 double what it was in 2015 according to the World Health Organisation, that is a very large target group looking for something specific. Ageing brings with it a multitude of health conditions, requiring additional supplements to help address deficiencies or prevent health problems.

Functional and fortified foods have typically been more popular with older generations, particularly products that support heart, bone, eye and brain health, said Tara Bane, marketing manager, EMEA at Glanbia Nutritionals.

However, ingredients that provide consumers with energy, focus or have calming benefits should all now be considered when producing new snack products, as the functional trend is now popular with all age groups. Research shows that food with calming health properties is especially appealing to Gen Z and Millennials.

Bane added that younger generations (in particular, 25-34-year-olds) also turn to protein as an important aspect of a healthy snack. In fact, Glanbias research found that high protein snacks are sought after by 23% of German Millennials, alongside 18% of those in the UK and 15% in France.

For brands looking create products in line with this demand, snack bars are an obvious choice, with nearly one in three snack bar launches in 2020 featuring a high protein claim, she added.

But while functional snacks should be packed with the nutritional ingredients that will bring something to the party, consumers are also looking for labels to remain as clean as possible. Again, Glanbias research found that 43% of Baby Boomers prefer foods to be made with simple, real ingredients, while 43% of Gen Z prefer to have something labelled as no preservatives, artificial ingredients, high fructose corn syrup, or trans fats .

It is also important that functional snacks tap into the conscious indulgence trend as increasingly, consumers want to feel good about their snack choices without compromising on flavour, said Bane, noting that 64% of global consumers believe that indulgent snacking is acceptable as part of a healthy diet.

Chocolate fudge brownie and peanut butter cup are the top two preferred flavours, she added.

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Creating snacks to combat the age-old longevity challenge and other health issues - BakeryAndSnacks.com

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Celebrating the longevity of Louisa May Alcott’s ‘Little Women’ at her Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts – WCVB Boston

Celebrating the longevity of Louisa May Alcott's 'Little Women' at her Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts

Visit the house where Louisa May Alcott wrote 'Little Women' 150 years ago

Updated: 4:55 PM EDT Aug 26, 2021

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QUIETER SPOT THAT'S TRIED AND TRUE. SHAYNA: WE'LL TAKE YOU ONINE CONCD.OR ANTHONY: A GRAND CELEBRATION CALLS FOR A FRESH COAT OF PNTAI AT THE LUISA MAY HOUSEN I CONCORD. 2018 MARKED THE PUBLICATIONF O "LITTLE WOMEN." >> I'M CURRENTLY REREADING IT WITH MY FRIEND. IT'S NEAT TO COME AND SEE T HE HISTORICAL HOUSE. ANTHONY: WRITTEN HERE 150 YEARS AGO, NEVER OUTF O PRINT, TRANSLATED INTO 50 LANGUAGES. SO TRIED AND TRUE, HOLLYWOOD HAS DEMA YET ANOTHER MOVIE OF THE CLASSIC. IS OTHNE, DIRECTED B OSCAR-NOMINATED GRETA GERWICK. >> GRETA AND THE ACTRESSES HAVE COME THROUGH MULTIPLE TIMES ASKING QUESTIONS, WANTING TO SORT OF ABSORB THE HOU.SE THEY WANTED THE EXACT PAINT COLOR. THEY HAVE BEENAS PSIONATE ABOUT GETTING IT RIGHT. ANTHONY: THERE ISO N SHORTAGE OF PASSION FOR ORCHARD HOUSE SAYS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR JAN TURNKWIS. VISITORS- - TURNQUIST. >> IT SPEAKS TO THE HEART OF SO MANY READERS NO MATTER WHAT THEIR CULTURE. THE FACT THAT YOU CAN COME RIGHT INTO THE ROOMS AND FEEL AS IF THE FAMILYAS H JUST LEFT A MOMENT AGO IS AS CLOSE AS THEY CAN COME TO MEETINGHE T AUTHOR. ANTHONY: MOST NOTABLE AND ACCESSIBLE IS LUISA'S -- LOUISA'S WRINGTI DESK. >> TYHE FELT THEIR DAUGHTERS SHOULD FULFILL THEIR OWN DESTINY. A DESK OF HER OWN IN ANOTHER FAMILY WOULD HAVE BEEN CONSIDERED ABSOLUTELY FORBIDEN AND PHYSICIANS -- FORBIDDEN AND PHYSICIANS SAID BRAIN WORK SUCH AS WRITING THOUGHT THAT IS BAD FOR HIS HEALTH. THEY THOUGHT IT WAS RIDICULOUS. THEY GAVE HER A PEN WITH A LITTLE NOTE THAT SAID, MAY THIS PEN YOUR MUSE INSPIRED WHEN WRAPPED IN PURE POETIC FIRE. ANTHY:ON ALCOTT, AN EDUCAR,TO FOUNDED THE CONCORD SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE HERE p ONE YEAR LATER HE BUILT A LECTURE HALL OUTSIDE. IT IS SLATED FOR THE HOLLYODWO DEBUT. >> THE MAKERS OF THIS PARTICULAR MOVIE WANTED SO MUCH TO DO SOME OF THE FILMING HERE AT THE SCHOOLF O PHILOSOPHY WAS GOING TO WORK, THEY THOUGHT,OR F THE SCHOOL SCENE WHEN AMY MARCH BRINGS PICKLED LINES TO SCHOOL. >> 150 YEARS AND STILL GOING STRONG. WHATOU WLD LOUISA MAKE OF ALL THE FUSS? >> SHE REALLY, I THIS I, WOULD BE COMPLETELY ASTONISHED THAT COULD CONTINUE LONG AFTER THE PUBLICATION OF THE BOOK, 150 YEARS, I THINK SHE WOULD BE AMUSED, PLEASED, AND MOSTLY AMAZED. SHAYNA: JUST AWESOME. AND THE FILM "LITTLE WOMEN" WAS RELEASEDN I 2019 AND GOT SIX OSCAR NOMINATIO.NS ANTHONY: ONE FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN. IT'S OPENED ON WEEKENDS AND SATU SA TURDAYS BUT YOU HAVE TO SIGN UP FOR A TIMED RESERVATION. LAL RIGHT, EVERYONE, THAT'S IT

Celebrating the longevity of Louisa May Alcott's 'Little Women' at her Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts

Visit the house where Louisa May Alcott wrote 'Little Women' 150 years ago

Updated: 4:55 PM EDT Aug 26, 2021

The year 2018 marked the sesquicentennial of the publication of "Little Women." Written in Concord at Orchard House 150 years ago, it never went out of print and has been translated into 50 languages. It is so tried and true, Hollywood has made yet another movie of the classic, this one directed by Oscar-nominated Greta Gerwig.

The year 2018 marked the sesquicentennial of the publication of "Little Women." Written in Concord at Orchard House 150 years ago, it never went out of print and has been translated into 50 languages. It is so tried and true, Hollywood has made yet another movie of the classic, this one directed by Oscar-nominated Greta Gerwig.

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Celebrating the longevity of Louisa May Alcott's 'Little Women' at her Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts - WCVB Boston

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