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Category Archives: BioEngineering

International conference on trends in bioengineering – Times of India

PUNE: The MIT School of Bioengineering Sciences & Research, MIT ADT University, Pune, has organized the fourth international conference on Recent Trends in Bioengineering (ICRTB 2021) on February 12 and 13 through virtual mode, a statement issued by the university said. The conference will be inaugurated by chief guest Aliasger K. Salem, Bighley Chair of the Pharmaceutical Sciences University of Iowa, USA, Mangesh Karad, Executive President and Vice-Chancellor, and Vinayak Ghaisas, Director of the BIO Engineering Institute and convenor of the conference.The conference theme areas include nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology, tissue engineering, environmental biotechnology, wearables & diagnostics, assistive devices, biomedical robotics, medical image processing, nanoinformatics, immunoinformatics, drug design, AI, and Big data in biology and Biomaterials.The two-day conference will include talks by eminent keynote speakers such as Dr. Karl Bohringer, Professor at University of Washington USA, Dr. Jeremy Simpson, Professor, University College Dublin, Ireland, Dr. Anurag Agrawal, Director at CSIR-IGIB India, among many others.More than 100 abstracts have been received for oral and poster presentations from all over India and abroad. The organizers have collaborated with the Springer Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering for publishing selected high-quality research papers that will be presented at the conference. An industry expo is also organized with participation from various bioengineering companies displaying their innovative products and solutions.

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COVID-19 can affect the blood. Its spike protein may be the culprit. – News@Northeastern

Early on in the pandemic, Lee Makowski read an article about the condition of peoples bodies after dying of COVID-19, and he was shocked by what he learnedthere was something very wrong with the patients blood.

The autopsy reports revealed COVID-19 patients were suffering from huge amounts of thick, coagulated blood, and dysfunctional blood vessels were tearing through body tissue instead of repairing ithighly uncommon side effects of respiratory diseases.

Lee Makowski, chair of the bioengineering department at Northeastern. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

The postmortem evidence plus his own experience with something called COVID toesan odd side effect of the disease that causes heightened blood vessel formation in the toes, turning them bright redled Makowski to speculate that something about the virus might be causing abnormal blood-related complications.

One of the most perplexing and devastating effects of this disease is the scenario where three or four weeks after being hospitalized with pneumonia, people under the age of 50 are back home, they feel fine, and then all of a sudden they have a stroke and die, says Makowski, professor and chair of the bioengineering department at Northeastern.

Makowski, who recently published his hypothesis in the journal Viruses, believes the spike protein found on the surface of the virus might mimic proteins that regulate blood vessels and control the formation of blood clots, which could explain many of the non-respiratory complications of COVID-19.

The spike protein is an arm-like apparatus that the virus uses to attach to and enter healthy cells. At the tip of the spike protein rests a string of three amino acids called RGD. This structure is known for connecting cells to each other in the body.

Researchers dont know yet whether RGD is the culprit for COVID-19s blood-related complications, but they do know that RGD can contribute to the formation of blood clots and the growth of new blood vessels when it interacts with cell receptors called integrins.

Other proteins that have RGD are known to cause complications. Our theory is that RGD is making it easier for the virus to bind to things that could cause these blood complications, says William Olson-Sidford, a third-year bioengineering student and co-author of the paper who worked on this project as a co-op last fall.

Right now, researchers know that the viruss spike protein binds to cell receptors called ACE2. ACE2 is found in many cell types including in the lungs, heart, blood vessels, kidneys, liver, and gastrointestinal tract.

But our theory is that because [the virus] has an RGD, it may also be more likely to bind to other cells in the body that people arent thinking about, Olson-Sidford says.

Makowski hypothesizes that dysregulated blood vessel growthwhich can disrupt lung tissueis triggered by an increase of RGD during infection.

As for COVID-19-related kidney failure, its hard to know whether its caused by direct damage to the tissue by viral invasion or indirect damage through coagulation and blocked arteries, Makowski says. But either way, a faulty connection between RGD and integrin could be the culprit.

Recognizing that coagulation is a major problem has greatly improved the survival rate of people who are severely sick with COVID-19, Makowski says. Now if you end up in the ICU, you almost always get an anticoagulant, and that saves a lot of lives.

Uncovering the cause of that coagulation is the next step. Makowski hopes his hypothesis will spur other researchers to investigate further.

For media inquiries, please contact Shannon Nargi at s.nargi@northeastern.edu or 617-373-5718.

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2021 Exclusive Insights on: Rhodiola Extract Market to Witness Robust Expansion throughout the Forecast Period| Martin Bauer Group, Parchem, The Green…

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2021 Exclusive Insights on: Rhodiola Extract Market to Witness Robust Expansion throughout the Forecast Period| Martin Bauer Group, Parchem, The Green...

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Ionic liquid formulation can uniformly deliver chemotherapy to tumors while destroying cancerous tissue in preclinical studies | Harvard John A….

A research team led by Samir Mitragotri, the Hiller Professor of Bioengineering and Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Rahmi Oklu, of the Mayo Clinic, report the development of a new ionic liquid formulation that killed cancer cells and allowed uniform distribution of a chemotherapy drug into liver tumors and other solid tumors in the lab. This discovery could solve a problem that has long plagued drug delivery to tumors and provide new hope to patients with liver cancer awaiting a liver transplant.

The preclinical study results are published in Science Translational Medicine.

Uniform drug delivery to tumors is often riddled with challenges. Higher drug doses are often used to encourage drug delivery into the tumor, and these higher doses could lead to significant toxicity.

"If the drug cannot penetrate the tumor and remain there, then it cannot do its job," said Oklu, the director of Mayo Clinics Minimally Invasive Therapeutics Laboratory.

Current treatment involves ablation, which involves heating or cooling the tumor or infusing radioactive particles into the arteries of the tumor to destroy the cancer cells and keep patients within the criteria for a transplant.

"You could do a microwave ablation and basically burn the tumor, but that is often not an option if the tumor is close to the heart or other important structures. And sometimes it is hard to find the blood supply of the tumor to infuse the radioactive particles," said Oklu.

The research team developed an ionic liquid essentially salt in a liquid state as an alternative way to deliver drugs into tumors through an ultrasound-guided needle injection. Once injected, the ionic liquid deposited the chemotherapy drugs uniformly, killing the cancer cells as the liquid engulfed the tumors.

Mitragotri and his lab have been pioneering the use of ionic liquids for all kinds of treatment applications, including as a way to deliver insulin by skin patches and pills, as nanoparticle coatings for targeted delivery, as vaccine adjuvants, and as a way to deliver therapeutics to treat psoriasis.

Ionic liquids are an exceptionally versatile group of materials, said Mitragotri. In our lab, we have already demonstrated that they have the ability to overcome a variety of biological barriers within the body for delivering drugs. In this study, we demonstrate a novel application of ionic liquids to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in the liver tumor.

The researchers reported this approach was successful in preclinical studies using freshly resected human tumors in the lab and liver tumors in animal models. In addition, the authors reported that the chemotherapy remained in the targeted zone for the length of the 28-day trial.

Whereas drugs often wash away quickly from direct injection into tumors or from standard IV delivery of chemotherapy through the veins of the arm, the ionic liquid, which the authors call a "locally active agent for tumor treatment and eradication," or LATTE, also encouraged immune cell infiltration in the microenvironment of the tumor. This may play a role in achieving immunotherapy in solid tumors. The researchers say this could solve current challenges, especially in hepatocellular carcinoma the most common form of liver cancer where liver transplant can be curative.

The authors suggest that LATTE may work via diverse methods, and future studies are planned to expand on these preclinical findings. Future efforts might examine additional chemotherapy drugs, effects of immunotherapy agents and effects on overall survival, and involve a detailed analysis of local and body-wide immune implications of this experimental intervention.

This has been a very exciting collaboration, said Mitrigotri. Our lab focuses on chemistry, material science and engineering aspects of ionic liquids. This collaborative study with interventional radiologist Dr. Oklus lab at Mayo Clinic has enabled us to demonstrate a novel application of these amazing materials.

In addition to Oklu, Mayo Clinic authors include lead author Hassan Albadawi, Zefu Zhang, Izzet Altun, Jingjie Hu, and Leila Jamal. In addition to Mitragotri, authors from Harvard University are Kelly Ibsen, and Eden Tanner.

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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Global Chitin 2021 Industry, Market Growth, Analysis, Trend and Forecast to 2027 Wall Street Call – Reported Times

iCrowdNewswire Feb 12, 20213:30 PM ET

Chitin Market 2021-2027

A New Market Study, Titled Chitin Market Upcoming Trends, Growth Drivers and Challenges has been featured on fusionmarketresearch.

Description

This global study of theChitin marketoffers an overview of the existing market trends, drivers, restrictions, and metrics and also offers a viewpoint for important segments. The report also tracks product and services demand growth forecasts for the market. There is also to the study approach a detailed segmental review. A regional study of the globalChitin industryis also carried out in North America, Latin America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, and the Near East & Africa.The report mentions growth parameters in the regional markets along with major players dominating the regional growth.

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Scopolamine is a medication used in the treatment of motion sickness and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Scopolamine is used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by motion sickness or from anesthesia given during surgery.

The report offers detailed coverage of Chitin industry and main market trends with impact of coronavirus. The market research includes historical and forecast market data, demand, application details, price trends, and company shares of the leading Chitin by geography. The report splits the market size, by volume and value, on the basis of application type and geography.

First, this report covers the present status and the future prospects of the global Chitin market for 2015-2024.And in this report, we analyze global market from 5 geographies: Asia-Pacific[China, Southeast Asia, India, Japan, Korea, Western Asia], Europe[Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, Netherlands, Turkey, Switzerland], North America[United States, Canada, Mexico], Middle East & Africa[GCC, North Africa, South Africa], South America[Brazil, Argentina, Columbia, Chile, Peru].

At the same time, we classify Chitin according to the type, application by geography. More importantly, the report includes major countries market based on the type and application.Finally, the report provides detailed profile and data information analysis of leading Chitin company.

Key CompaniesFMC CorpKitozymeKunpoong BioBIO21Heppe Medical ChitosanYaizu SuisankagakuGolden-ShellLushen BioengineeringAK BIOTECHZhejiang New Fuda Ocean BiotechWeifang Sea Source Biological ProductsQingdao Honghai Bio-techHaidebei Marine BioengineeringJiangsu Aoxin BiotechnologyJinhu Crust Product

Market Segment as follows:By RegionAsia-Pacific[China, Southeast Asia, India, Japan, Korea, Western Asia]Europe[Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, Netherlands, Turkey, Switzerland]North America[United States, Canada, Mexico]Middle East & Africa[GCC, North Africa, South Africa]South America[Brazil, Argentina, Columbia, Chile, Peru]

Market by TypeChitosan HClCarboxymethyl ChitosanChitosan Quaternary Ammonium SaltHydroxypropyl ChitosanChitosan OligosaccharideOthers

Market by ApplicationMedicalHealth FoodCosmeticsWater TreatmentOthersAsk Queries @ https://www.fusionmarketresearch.com/enquiry.php/(COVID-19-Version)-Global-Chitin-Market/12603 Table of Contents

Part 1 Market Overview1.1 Market Definition1.2 Market Development1.2.1 Current Situation1.2.2 Aspects of COVID-19 Impact1.3 By TypeTable Type of ChitinFigure Global Chitin Market Share by Type in 20191.4 By ApplicationTable Application of ChitinFigure Global Chitin Market Share by Application in 20191.5 By RegionFigure Global Chitin Market Share by Region in 2019Figure Asia Chitin Market Share by Region in 2019

Part 2 Key Companies2.1 FMC Corp2.1.1 Company ProfileTable FMC Corp Overview List2.1.2 Products & Services Overview2.1.3 Sales Data ListTable Chitin Business Operation of FMC Corp (Sales Revenue, Sales Volume, Price, Cost, Gross Margin)2.2 Kitozyme2.3 Kunpoong Bio2.4 BIO212.5 Heppe Medical Chitosan2.6 Yaizu Suisankagaku2.7 Golden-Shell2.8 Lushen Bioengineering2.9 AK BIOTECH2.10 Zhejiang New Fuda Ocean Biotech2.11 Weifang Sea Source Biological Products2.12 Qingdao Honghai Bio-tech2.13 Haidebei Marine Bioengineering2.14 Jiangsu Aoxin Biotechnology2.15 Jinhu Crust Product

Part 3 Global Market Status and Future Forecast3.1 Global Market by RegionTable Global Chitin Market by Region, 2015-2019 (Million USD)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Region in 2019 (Million USD)Table Global Chitin Market by Region, 2015-2019 (Volume)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Region in 2019 (Volume)Table Price List by Region, 2015-20193.2 Global Market by CompanyTable Global Chitin Market by Company, 2015-2019 (Million USD)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Company in 2019 (Million USD)Table Global Chitin Market by Company, 2015-2019 (Volume)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Company in 2019 (Volume)Table Price List by Company, 2015-20193.3 Global Market by TypeTable Global Chitin Market by Type, 2015-2019 (Million USD)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Type in 2019 (Million USD)Table Global Chitin Market by Type, 2015-2019 (Volume)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Type in 2019 (Volume)Table Price List by Type, 2015-20193.4 Global Market by ApplicationTable Global Chitin Market by Application, 2015-2019 (Million USD)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Application in 2019 (Million USD)Table Global Chitin Market by Application, 2015-2019 (Volume)Figure Global Chitin Market Share by Application in 2019 (Volume)Table Price List by Application, 2015-20193.5 Global Market by ForecastFigure Global Chitin Market Forecast, 2020-2025 (Million USD)Figure Global Chitin Market Forecast, 2020-2025 (Volume)ContinueABOUT US :

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Keywords:Chitin, Chitin Industry, Chitin Market Trends, Chitin Industry Trends, Chitin Market Growth, Chitin Market Size, Chitin Manufacturer, Global Chitin Industry, Global Chitin Market Trends, Chitin Growth, Global Chitin Market Share, Chitin Industry Analysis, Chitin Industry Forecast, Chitin Manufacturer, Chitin Manufacturers, Chitin Market, Chitin Market Forecast, Chitin Market Analysis, Chitin Market Parameters, Chitin Market Segmentation, Chitin Market Share, Chitin Market Trend, Chitin Prospectus, Chitin Research Report, Chitin Segmentation, Global Chitin Market Size, Global Chitin Survey

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[Herald Interview] GenEdit to hone in on nervous system disorders in 2021 blueprint – The Korea Herald

It was Christmas Eve in 2015. The seasonal festive vibe was blocked out from the science lab in UC Berkley, California, where bioengineering doctoral candidate Lee Gun-woo, then 27, was immersed in his research.

Lees heart quickened as he watched the results of his experiment unravel before his eyes. A polymer nanoparticle traveled straight to his intended target genome in a test rat and changed its DNA.

A jolt ran down his spine. This could make CRISPR DNA scissors work in the human body. It could be a game changer in delivering drugs to tackle genetically caused illnesses, he thought.

Lee dialed up his friend and fellow scientist Park Hyo-min.

Hyeong, lets start a company, Lee said.

The conception

The story of Lee Gun-woo, 33, and Park Hyo-min, 41, is truly an American Dream come true.

The duo co-founded the gene therapy company GenEdit in May 2016 with Lee as the chief executive officer leading research and Park as the chief technology officer responsible for validation of development.

What GenEdit does is step up the game for the groundbreaking DNA scissors technology called CRISPR.

The technology snips parts of the human DNA to remove or insert new genetic material. The Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2020 went to scientists Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for their contribution to its discovery.

Lee and Park are not strangers to the leading CRISPR researcher Doudna, who is a professor at their alma mater UC Berkley.

Doudnas name is listed as a contributor to Lee and Parks co-authored article published in Nature in 2017, titled Nanoparticle delivery of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein and donor DNA in vivo induces homology-directed DNA repair. Lee, Park and scientist Michael Convoy have equal stakes in the piece as main authors, according to the science journal.

CRISPR gene editing is a two-part system comprising a customizable guide RNA and a protein called Cas9.

The guide RNA directs Cas9 to any desired segment of DNA for editing. The Cas9 enzyme then cuts the DNA at that precise location, allowing for genes to be turned on or off or for the removal or insertion of DNA. But editing the DNA of cells in a petri dish -- or even curing a mouse of a disease -- is one thing; making the hot new technology work in humans is a whole other challenge. Sneaking the gene-editing complex into human cells is no easy task, according to American Chemical Societys Chemical & Engineering News introductory article dated 2017.

This is where GenEdit steps in.

Born out of UC Berkleys laboratory, GenEdits polymer nanoparticle delivery technology can make the Cas9 travel to the desired location in human body. This innovative concept has attracted global angel investors such as the likes of Sequoia Capital, Bow Capital, Data Collective Bio and SK Holdings. The Series Seed financing round raised a total of $8.5 million, led by DCVC Bio and SK Holdings.

Before he knew it, Lee was named in Forbes top 30 entrepreneurs under the age of 30 in 2018.

5th anniversary

Now in its fifth year, GenEdit aspires for the future where all hereditary illness can be cured with gene therapies.

There are countless ailments that are passed down the blood line and GenEdit is studying DNA markers for non-viral polymers that will match them.

Speaking to The Korea Herald in a video interview, CTO Park Hyo-min said that GenEdit will soon decide on the first target disease within 2021.

Were not definitive at this point, but there is a good chance we will narrow down our focus to central nervous system diseases, for which we have been able to amass a volume of promising data, Park said.

It is not with absolute certainty I say this, but we may be able to deliver a novel drug for a rare CNS disease within the next six to seven years, said Park, if authorities fast-track their approval for orphan drugs for rare diseases.

Park declined to say if Alzheimers Disease or dementia were research subjects.

We are aware that companies who tackle AD receive tremendous attention from investors. However, conditions like AD or dementia do not have a clear genetic cause, Park said, underlining that GenEdits target indications are only those with high correlation with genetic roots.

Other than CNS indications, the company is also perusing therapies for liver and immune cell diseases.

The liver has comparatively low hurdle for drug delivery mechanisms, Park said, Precisely for that reason there is much competition in the area of liver treatments, but we may still consider to throw our gloves in.

Apart from their main target pipeline, for which GenEdit intends to see through to drug commercialization, the company is open to strategically licensing out other findings, Park said.

When asked what motivates these researches, and what does it feel like to be a young, celebrated scientist, CEO Lee Gun-woo -- who is eight years younger than co-founder Park -- remained modest.

Through this winding long process of life, I dream of serving the society in any way I can. To be able to serve, I believe its imperative to broaden my capabilities, Lee said.

I had the opportunity to listen to astronaut Jonny Kims webinar. He spoke of Martin Luther King and the life of service, that everyone is capable of greatness through the act of giving, Lee said. One of my dreams is to use science to benefit more patients, and I am profoundly grateful that I am on that path.

The young co-founders of GenEdit had not foreseen that they would be leading a gene therapy company in the US when they first set foot on US soil in 2011.

Lee had come straight after his bachelors degree in bioengineering at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Daejeon, and Park had come after completing a masters in food science at Korea University in Seoul.

Lee had spent most of his life growing up in his home city of Daegu, while Park had lived in Seoul.

I would like to tell scientists in Korea that they must create reasons to come out to the US. Korea has great science, but one cant deny that its here in the US where all the breakthrough innovations happen, said Park.

If in Korea, every academic novelty would have to be indirectly studied. Here, everything becomes a raw, immediate experience. We get to be in the heart of the research leading scientific progress, shoulder-to-shoulder with Nobel laureates, Park said.

Being in southern California, we are adjacent to companies like Genentech. Remember the time when the only drugs available were swallowable tablets? Genentech is the company that pioneered the protein-based drug shots that revolutionized cancer therapies. We aspire to be the next Genentech in the realm of gene therapies, Lee said.

His source of joy is his parents who send him support from Daegu. Although there are limitations to their comprehension of the intricate science of Lees work, news of their son always fills them with pride, Lee said. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Lee has not been able to pay them visits as of late.

As for Park, he is most thankful to Lee and his wife for being a spiritual buttress. As a father of four, with his eldest now 12 years old, Park says he is especially thankful to Lee for clocking in more hours at work, and to his wife for her sacrificial love.

What binds Lee and Park together as partners is the deep trust and camaraderie that has built up in the decade they have known each other. The five years in school and five years in business have united them as near-family and made them an inseparable team.

As of February, GenEdit had 17 full-time employees, of whom 14 were researchers. By the end of the year, GenEdit plans to boost the headcount to 27 full-time workers. Lee and Park said that they have built a culture where it is OK to make mistakes and keep matters transparent. Anyone who wants to try some cool science and do fun researches is welcome to join this science-focused team, they said.

By Lim Jeong-yeo (kaylalim@heraldcorp.com)

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