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Helping Your Ag Customers Improve Their Farm Business IQ – ABA Banking Journal

By Carrie Clark Carlsen

While we have a keynote speaker, we also bring in a commodities outlook guy, an update on crop insurance, some artificial intelligence, and someone from a machinery equipment dealer in New York, explains Shan Hanes, the banks president and CEO.

Weve had an expert panel on everything you wanted to ask your banker but couldnt, he adds with a chuckle. We had bankers up here on stage and it was free reinattack your banker!

Events like Farmer Focus Day are just one way that Americas ag bankers are tackling a perennial farm challenge: improving ag producers business acumen, especially in an era of disruption. Changes in agriculture are going to accelerate over the next 10 years, says David Kohl, an emeritus ag economist at Virginia Techespecially in areas like technology, bioengineering and big data. Agribusinesses are increasing in complexity, and operations are growing in size at a time when many farms are transitioning to the next generation.

We are transitioning from the baby boom generation to Generation X, millennials, pick your generation, and as that changes, technology is changing, the cost of farming is changing, farm sizes are getting biggerand you cant farm the way you used to farm, adds Tony Hotchkiss, EVP for ag banking at Regions Bank. Farmers have done a lot to upgrade the tech they usebut many are still running the farm the way they used to.

I often hear weve never done it that way or Ive never had to do it that way, Hotchkiss explains, speaking at the recent American Bankers Association Agricultural Bankers Conference. Its very important that as bankers we take ownership of this issue and make sure we are introducing concepts and topics, and helping producers understand the new complexity of farming.

In navigating these sweeping changes, Kohl emphasizes that farm business IQ is the common denominator for producer success. And thats an opportunity for ag bankers to team up with customers as their trusted advisersdelivering candid conversations, constructive coaching and community-building events. After all, when ag borrowers develop their business IQ, it pays off for the lender as well.

It all starts with dialogue. Scott Hauseman, a senior ag lender at Fulton Bank in Pennsylvania encourages his team to consider expectations with their producers; ask about accruals; talk about sales, credit quality and exposure; and do stress testing with lots of of what-if questions: If we go to covenants at this level, whats that feel like? Are you comfortable?

You need to be able to talk to your borrower about cost of production, where maybe in past eras we didnt really carebecause in our part of the world we had lots of equity and usually cash flow drove decisioning, he adds. Thats a big change because of things were seeing and the times we are in.

Meanwhile, Hotchkiss instructs his lenders to challenge their customers thinking, have them look at their margins, study statistics based on acreage and calculate the cost of production. If a producer prefers the dirt side of farming, his lender should be asking what hes doing to make sure that the business side is managed properly.

Hard conversations are where things begin, but producers need to move beyond questions and start finding their own answers. Hauseman emphasizes the importance of sharing dataand analytical tools to employ itwith farm customers. His personal philosophy is that if hes making credit decisions on customer financials, he should be willing to give them the spread that he made that decision on.

Shan Hanes agrees. The bank felt that the number-one thing that ag producers were missing was knowing their breakeven costs, he said. Fifteen years ago, Hanes bank developed a breakeven analysis spreadsheet for customers to use. The reason I think thats important is as events happen people can make adjustments to that spreadsheet.

At the beginning of the year, Hanes also has his ag customers write down their projected cash flows, including living expenses, and set objectives for the year. He asks them what they expect the market high and low to be. It forces them to engage in the marketing process, he says.

Hauseman uses coaching models with his loan officers, which he hopes they will use with customers. He asks his lenders: Do you have the right financial statements that are even testable? Or accrual statements?Ive seen that this coaching model goes over very well, Hauseman continues. Ive seen some really good discussions with customers because lenders have been taught some skill and capability levels that they wouldnt have had without that model in place.

Hotchkiss encourages his ag lenders at Regions Bank to use this coaching approach to prove their value as a partner who can do more than lend money. He tells lenders: Share data with your producers, and show them, Based on what was reported, heres what your peers are doing and heres where you are.

Additionally, Regions Bank is employing technology to deliver coaching on succession planning, land trusts, diversification and many other topics. Younger row-crop farmers prefer high-tech interfaces, Hotchkiss says. We are generating more interest with webcasts and podcasts, where we send them links. Theyre watching these little 10-15 minute snippets on very specific topics while they are in their combines.

Events like Farmer Focus Day build on the tough conversations and one-on-one coaching to provide a fun yet educational group dynamic. Another example Hanes uses: the marketing game. Over the course of several weeks, six to eight novice and experienced farmers are intermingled at tables for role-playing and problem solving. Each group is assigned an actual farm operation case study involving a commodity, specific market conditions, financing options and other variables.

In each weekly meeting, new variables are presented, such as developments in world trade, price fluctuations and/or unplanned expenses. During the simulation, Hanes says young and old engage with his lenders and with each otherrooting for and learning from each other, working together to come up with a viable plan for a profitable farm operation.

Hanes was surprised by a corollary outcomeone that has nothing to do with business IQ, but one that lays the groundwork for producer success. We have seen those older farmers who were looking for their next tenant sit at a table and build a relationship, he reflects. They made a friendship, they stayed connected to each other and we were able to provide an environment where they could transition from one generation to the next.

Building farm business IQit brings bankers and farmers closer together.

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Smart microneedle insulin patch could make it easier to treat diabetes – Digital Trends

Close to 10% of the U.S. population, around 30.3 million people, have diabetes. A new treatment delivery system created by bioengineers at the University of North Carolina and theUniversity of California, Los Angeles could help make life easier for them via a smart insulin patch thats about the size of a quarter. All a patient would need to use it would be to slap on a new patch at the start of the day, after which it would monitor and manage glucose levels for the next 24 hours.

It is smart and simple, which means it could help enhance the health and quality of life for people with diabetes, Zhen Gu, the study leader and a professor of bioengineering at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering, told Digital Trends. It is a smart glucose-responsive insulin release device because it can respond to high blood sugar levels and release only the necessary insulin dosage, thus reducing the risk of hypoglycemia. This is a small and disposable device, so it is very simple and convenient to use; one can remove the patch any time to stop the administration of insulin.

The glucose-monitoring adhesive patch is covered in tiny microneedles, each one less than a millimeter in length. They are made from a glucose-sensing polymer and come pre-loaded with insulin. When the patch is applied, the microneedles penetrate the skin and start measuring blood sugar levels. If the glucose levels increase, the polymer triggers the release of insulin. At the point at which levels return to normal, the patchs insulin delivery also slows down. While this approach still involves pricking the patient with a needle, these needles are much smaller than regular needles. As a result, the patch is less painful than an ordinary injection.

So far, the patch has been successful in studies involving pigs. The researchers were able to use it to successfully control the glucose levels in these animals, which had Type I diabetes, for around 20 hours. Next, the researchers are hoping to progress to further trials, with the goal of commercializing their technology.

This patch has already been accepted by FDAs emerging technology programs for clinical trial applications, Gu said.

A paper describing the research was recently published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering.

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Reshaping stream structure to improve habitats – The Daily Evergreen

Palouse Conservation District details restoration techniques, need for stream complexity

Palouse Conservation District coordinator, Randy Stevens talks about his plan to design a better structural element in streams on Wednesday at Paradise Creek Brewery.

TONY NGUYEN

Palouse Conservation District coordinator, Randy Stevens talks about his plan to design a better structural element in streams on Wednesday at Paradise Creek Brewery.

TONY NGUYEN

TONY NGUYEN

Palouse Conservation District coordinator, Randy Stevens talks about his plan to design a better structural element in streams on Wednesday at Paradise Creek Brewery.

The Palouse Conservation District (PCD) held a presentation about stream structure on Wednesday in the Paradise Creek Brewery Trailside Taproom.

Randy Stevens, PCD conservation coordinator, said changing stream structure can produce diverse habitats, which can help address drought and flooding.

He said reshaping stream structure can restore riparian zones, which are areas near streams, to healthy conditions.

This can be done in various ways, one of which being streambank bioengineering, Stevens said. This process includes using live and dead plant materials with natural and synthetic support materials. Streambank bioengineering helps control the streams behavior.

Stevens said using post-assisted log structures (PALS) can also change stream structure. This is a type of restoration technique where wood debris is planted in the stream.

PALS creates more water flow and increases the flow of sediment deposits, he said. These structures also create areas for species like salmon to lay eggs and raise their young.

He said more logs in the stream means there is more chance for the streams structure to become more complex.

The more complexity a stream has, the healthier it is thought to be, Stevens said.

Complex structures help build more resilience in the streams environment, he said. Streams become more functional as well, meaning more species will be able to live in the streams.

Stevens said stream complexity can also create refuge for wildlife by developing restoration areas near the streams.

If a stream lacks structure, this means a stream has a smooth system and the water flows in a straight manner, he said. This can be problematic. For example, if a flood occurs, fish can be easily swept away.

Another method to alter stream structure is the use of beaver dam analogs (BDAs), which are human-made designs that imitate natural beaver dams, Stevens said. BDAs collect a lot of debris that travel downstream, expands riparian vegetation and can change ecosystems rapidly.

He said changing stream structures to a more complex system is important because it helps improve the overall function of a stream. This includes drought resistance and reducing the severity of fire.

This also helps keep the water in the stream, which is important for aquifer recharge for groundwater levels.

Complex stream structures also mitigate the effects of flooding, he said.

Streams give the water a place to go, slow it down, and reduce that kind of thing from happening, Stevens said.

Some of the issues streams face include lack of water storage, which increases the effects of droughts, Stevens said. Lack of vegetation in and around the streams, lack of habitat for wildlife, and increased water temperature negatively affect the overall health of the stream.

Alison Crowley, PCD education and outreach as well as a restoration technician and AmeriCorps intern, said the public should care about this issue because the local area is surrounded by agriculture. She said it is important for individuals to bridge the gap between environmental awareness and how people operate within the environment.

Theyre a part of the issue, and theyre a part of the solution, she said.

Crowley said the PCD holds conservation talk series every second Wednesday of each month where the PCD discusses conservation practices they support and implement. They also talk about conservation efforts PCD has conducted.

The next PCD conservation talk is on March 11 from 6-7 p.m. in the Paradise Creek Brewery Trailside Taproom. The PCD will talk about conservation and native plants.

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Atom or noise? New method helps cryo-EM researchers tell the difference – Stanford University News

Wah Chiu, a professor at SLAC and Stanford, Grigore Pintilie, a computational scientist in Chius group, and colleagues devised the new measures, known as Q-scores, to address that issue. To compute Q-scores, scientists start by building and adjusting an atomic model until it best matches the corresponding cryo-EM derived 3D map. Then, they compare the map to an idealized version in which each atom is well-resolved, revealing to what degree the map truly resolves the atoms in the atomic model.

The researchers validated their approach on large molecules, including a protein called apoferritin that they studied in theStanford-SLAC Cryo-EM Facilities.Kaiming Zhang, another research scientist in Chius group, produced 3D maps close to the highest resolution reached to date up to 1.75 angstrom, less than a fifth of a nanometer. Using such maps,they showed how Q-scores varied in predictable ways based on overall resolution and on which parts of a moleculethey were studying. Pintilie and Chiu say they hope Q-scores will help biologists and others using cryo-EM better understand and interpret the 3D maps and resulting atomic models.

The study was performed in collaboration with researchers from Stanfords Department of Bioengineering. Molecular graphics and analysis were performed using the University of California, San Franciscos Chimera software package. The project was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Citation: Grigore Pintilie et al.,Nature Methods, February 10, 2020 (10.1038/s41592-020-0731-1)

For questions or comments, contact the SLAC Office of Communications atcommunications@slac.stanford.edu.

SLAC is a vibrant multiprogram laboratory that explores how the universe works at the biggest, smallest and fastest scales and invents powerful tools used by scientists around the globe. With research spanning particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology, materials, chemistry, bio- and energy sciences and scientific computing, we help solve real-world problems and advance the interests of the nation.

SLAC is operated by Stanford University for theU.S. Department of Energys Office of Science.The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time.

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Reception to open Magnificent Birds show – The Greater New Milford Spectrum

Published 12:00am EST, Friday, February 14, 2020

Sherman Library will open an exhibit, Magnificent Birds, with a reception Feb. 21 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

The show, which will feature photographs by Jeff Ginsburg and Lu Li, will include an artist talk March 14 at 1 p.m.

The show will run through April 1.

Growing up in very different worlds, Ginsburg and Li both share a love of travel, nature and photography.

As a little girl, Li began her fascination with cameras, rare commodities in China.

Nevertheless, after years of saving, she succeeded and was able to travel and photograph the exotic lands of China during college breaks.

Li earned a bachelors degree in radar engineering from Chinas top engineering college and then became the first female to lead a major development team at the Chinese Navys Research Institute.

Li earned a masters degree in Computer Science at CUNY and implemented next generation cell phone systems.

I think the camera often produces images more compelling than the actual subject, Li said. I love spending hours quietly watching and recording my wild ducks and birds.

In fact, I feel Im one of them through my adoration and feelings of strong connection, she said. I think my photos capture their indescribable beauty.

Ginsburg grew up in Danbury and has been creatively improving photographs since building a basement darkroom when he was 11 years old.

He earned a bachelors degree in bioengineering at Duke University and while there worked for four years as the photographer for their daily paper, developing all his prints in their darkrooms and completing a rigorous photography course.

He then received a masters degree in electrical engineering at Washington University St. Louis and then worked in Boston as a biomedical engineer in research and development.

Later, he moved to Manhattan to create a reporting system at Morgan Stanley.

I believe every photo must have an emotional impact, said Ginsburg when asked what his guiding principle has been throughout his years of photography.

Now retired, they live in the woods on Squantz Pond and enjoy traveling to many countries and national parks.

Li enjoys photographing, learning French and playing the cello.

Li has just returned from the National Tennis Championships (amateurs over 40), beating her singles opponents with almost perfect scores.

Ginsburg enjoys photographing, sailing, playing tennis, and creative writing.

One of his prints was displayed at Dukes Nasher Art Museum.

His photo, Food Under Foot, won first prize at Great Hollow Juried Art Show 2018.

For more information about the show, call the Sherman Center library at 860-354-2455.

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Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market 2020 by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025 – Jewish Life News

ORBIS RESEARCH has recently announced Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market report with all the critical analysis on current state of industry, demand for product, environment for investment and existing competition. Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market report is a focused study on various market affecting factors and comprehensive survey of industry covering major aspects like product types, various applications, top regions, growth analysis, market potential, challenges for investor, opportunity assessments, major drivers and key players (The major players covered in Bioreactors and Fermenters are: Sartorius AG (BBI), ZETA, Danaher (Pall), Thermo Fisher, Pierre Guerin (DCI-Biolafitte), Merck KGaA, Bioengineering AG, Praj Hipurity Systems, Eppendorf AG, Applikon Biotechnology, Infors HT, Solaris, etc. )

Description

The Bioreactors and Fermenters market report provides a detailed analysis of global market size, regional and country-level market size, segmentation market growth, market share, competitive Landscape, sales analysis, impact of domestic and global market players, value chain optimization, trade regulations, recent developments, opportunities analysis, strategic market growth analysis, product launches, area marketplace expanding, and technological innovations.

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Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market the Major Players Covered in Bioreactors and Fermenters are: The major players covered in Bioreactors and Fermenters are: Sartorius AG (BBI), ZETA, Danaher (Pall), Thermo Fisher, Pierre Guerin (DCI-Biolafitte), Merck KGaA, Bioengineering AG, Praj Hipurity Systems, Eppendorf AG, Applikon Biotechnology, Infors HT, Solaris, etc. Among other players domestic and global, Bioreactors and Fermenters market share data is available for global, North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East & Africa and South America separately. Global Info Research analysts understand competitive strengths and provide competitive analysis for each competitor separately.

Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market segmentation

Bioreactors and Fermenters market is split by Type and by Application. For the period 2015-2025, the growth among segments provide accurate calculations and forecasts for sales by Type and by Application in terms of volume and value. This analysis can help you expand your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

By Type, Bioreactors and Fermenters market has been segmented into Single-use Bioreactors, Multiple-use Bioreactors, etc.

By Application, Bioreactors and Fermenters has been segmented into CROs, Academic and Research Institutes, Others, etc.

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Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market Regions and Countries Level Analysis

Regional analysis is another highly comprehensive part of the research and analysis study of the global Bioreactors and Fermenters market presented in the report. This section sheds light on the sales growth of different regional and country-level Bioreactors and Fermenters markets. For the historical and forecast period 2015 to 2025, it provides detailed and accurate country-wise volume analysis and region-wise market size analysis of the global Bioreactors and Fermenters market.

The report offers in-depth assessment of the growth and other aspects of the Bioreactors and Fermenters market in important countries (regions), including United States, Canada, Mexico, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Russia, Italy, China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia, Australia, Brazil and Saudi Arabia, etc. It also throws light on the progress of key regional Bioreactors and Fermenters markets such as North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America and Middle East & Africa.

Bioreactors and Fermenters competitive landscape provides details by vendors, including company overview, company total revenue (financials), market potential, global presence, Bioreactors and Fermenters sales and revenue generated, market share, price, production sites and facilities, SWOT analysis, product launch. For the period 2015-2020, this study provides the Bioreactors and Fermenters sales, revenue and market share for each player covered in this report.

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Table of Contents

1 Bioreactors and Fermenters Market Overview1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Bioreactors and Fermenters1.2 Classification of Bioreactors and Fermenters by Type1.2.1 Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Revenue by Type: 2015 VS 2019 VS 20251.2.2 Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Revenue Market Share by Type in 20191.2.3 OTC Interest Rate Derivatives1.2.4 OTC Forex Derivatives1.2.5 Others1.3 Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market by Application1.3.1 Overview: Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Revenue by Application: 2015 VS 2019 VS 20251.3.2 OTC Options1.3.3 Forward1.3.4 SWAP1.3.5 Others1.4 Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market by Regions1.4.1 Global Bioreactors and Fermenters Market Size by Regions: 2015 VS 2019 VS 20251.4.2 Global Market Size of Bioreactors and Fermenters (2015-2025)1.4.3 North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) Bioreactors and Fermenters Status and Prospect (2015-2025)1.4.4 Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) Bioreactors and Fermenters Status and Prospect (2015-2025)1.4.5 Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) Bioreactors and Fermenters Status and Prospect (2015-2025)1.4.6 South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia) Bioreactors and Fermenters Status and Prospect (2015-2025)1.4.7 Middle East & Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa) Bioreactors and Fermenters Status and Prospect (2015-2025)

2 Company Profiles2.1 GF Securities2.1.1 GF Securities Details2.1.2 GF Securities Major Business and Total Revenue (Financial Highlights) Analysis2.1.3 GF Securities SWOT Analysis2.1.4 GF Securities Product and Services2.1.5 GF Securities Bioreactors and Fermenters Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2018-2019)2.2 SHANXI Securities2.2.1 SHANXI Securities Details2.2.2 SHANXI Securities Major Business and Total Revenue (Financial Highlights) Analysis2.2.3 SHANXI Securities SWOT Analysis2.2.4 SHANXI Securities Product and Services2.2.5 SHANXI Securities Bioreactors and Fermenters Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2018-2019)2.3 GUOTAI JUNAN Securities2.3.1 GUOTAI JUNAN Securities Details2.3.2 GUOTAI JUNAN Securities Major Business and Total Revenue (Financial Highlights) Analysis2.3.3 GUOTAI JUNAN Securities SWOT Analysis2.3.4 GUOTAI JUNAN Securities Product and Services2.3.5 GUOTAI JUNAN Securities Bioreactors and Fermenters Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2018-2019)2.4 ZHONGTAI Securities2.4.1 ZHONGTAI Securities Details2.4.2 ZHONGTAI Securities Major Business and Total Revenue (Financial Highlights) Analysis2.4.3 ZHONGTAI Securities SWOT Analysis2.4.4 ZHONGTAI Securities Product and Services2.4.5 ZHONGTAI Securities Bioreactors and Fermenters Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2018-2019)2.5 INDUSTRIAL Securities

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