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Science can’t fix Whitehall on its own – Chemistry World

In an interview during the UKs EU referendum campaign in 2016, a cabinet minister gained some notoriety for dismissing economists gloomy Brexit predictions with the assertion that people have had enough of experts. How times have changed. Whatever became of that minister, they must be feeling pretty sheepish now, because it seems the UKs new government cant get enough of them. And scientists in particular.

In the run up to last years general election, there was very little talk of science priorities from any of the competing parties. Yet science policy watchers were beginning to speculate about what Prime Minister Boris Johnsons special adviser Dominic Cummings might have planned, as hints of a pro-science agenda began to emerge from his Downing Street meetings with researchers. As our story explains, early indications are that the scientific community does have reason to be cheerful, with promises of more funding and less bureaucracy, although there are murmurs of concern. For example, many researchers lament that while one arm of government is cutting red tape and giving out cash, another is taking away ERC grants and Erasmus scheme membership as it gets Brexit done.

In the run up to last years general election, there was very little talk of science priorities from any of the competing parties. Yet science policy watchers were beginning to speculate about what Prime Minister Boris Johnsons special adviser Dominic Cummings might have planned, as hints of a pro-science agenda began to emerge from his Downing Street meetings with researchers. As our story on pXX explains, early indications are that the scientific community does have reason to be cheerful, with promises of more funding and less bureaucracy, although there are murmurs of concern. For example, many researchers lament that while one arm of government is cutting red tape and giving out cash, another is taking away ERC grants and Erasmus scheme membership as it gets Brexit done.

Still there seems to be a genuine effort to put science at the heart of government. And not just as a source of evidence and advice. A review published late in 2019 that looked at research commissioned by government departments included among its recommendations a need for greater scientific expertise in those departments. The governments chief science adviser, former president of R&D at GSK, Patrick Vallance, followed this up by stating that the civil service intake should comprise many more science graduates. And in January, Cummings posted a job advert on his blog that called for mathematicians, economists, data scientists and super-talented weirdos to serve as special advisers to the government.

Vallances proposal seems eminently sensible. Stacking Whitehall with scientists who can apply their expertise and skills directly in the machinery of government is a fine idea. Yet Cummings advert caused the murmured misgivings to grow louder principally because his approach to applying science to public policy doesnt seem to pay much heed to good science policy. An uncritical faith in science to supply the answers to societal problems and deliver public good could be just as problematic as ignoring experts and evidence. Turning research and evidence into policies that bring about change in messy real-world problems is fraught with difficulty. As the British Academys new chief executive Hetan Shah wrote in Nature, boosting sciences role should be welcomed, but not at the expense of the social science and humanities expertise that are also essential to effective policy.

Cummings recruitment call drew particular concern for its recommended reading: a list of research papers focused on crunching data to make predictions about physical systems, with the implicit suggestion that their predictive powers could be translated into policy decisions. The authors of these papers have expressed delight but warn that these ideas will often fail if directly applied to social engineering projects because of the complexity of human cognition.

Chemistry doesnt feature in that reading list, but there is no shortage of papers that might be of interest. My own suggestion would be Site-selective enzymatic CH amidation for synthesis of diverse lactams. Not for its relevance to policy, but for what it teaches us about science itself. The papers PI, Nobel laureate Frances Arnold, retracted the paper in January because the results could not be reproduced. Her humble apology and admission on Twitter was widely shared and even drew a few column inches from the mainstream press. The details of the retraction arent known, but it offers a salutary lesson about sciences qualified certainties, its duty to accuracy and truth, and its gradual progress through patient increments. As Philip Ball discusses, it shows how science works best as a considered, slow process.

Chemistry doesnt feature in that reading list, but there is no shortage of papers that might be of interest. My own suggestion would be Site-selective enzymatic CH amidation for synthesis of diverse lactams. Not for its relevance to policy, but for what it teaches us about science itself. The papers PI, Nobel laureate Frances Arnold, retracted the paper in January because the results could not be reproduced. Herhumble apology and admissionon Twitter was widely shared and even drew a few column inches from the mainstream press. The details of the retraction arent known, but it offers a salutary lesson about sciences qualified certainties, its duty to accuracy and truth, and its gradual progress through patient increments. As Philip Ball discusses on pXX, it shows how science works best as a considered, slow process.

Yet such pleas for temperance seem unlikely to get much traction in the five-year push for political gains. And should Cummings experiments fail, there is a risk that science could suffer collateral damage in the fallout. The causes championed by one administration can quickly become a revanchist hit-list for the next. And what a wasted opportunity that would be.

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Science can't fix Whitehall on its own - Chemistry World

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N.J. DEPs PFAS directive to chemical companies will take years to resolve – WHYY

The state Department of Environmental Protection says it will take years to resolve its dispute with five chemical companies which it has accused of contaminating many areas of New Jersey with toxic PFAS chemicals.

Some nine months after issuing a strongly worded Directive to the companies to test, treat and remove the chemicals from soil and water around their facilities, the DEP issued a statement on Jan. 17 in response to a question from NJ Spotlight on why it had said nothing publicly about the initiative since announcing it in March 2019.

As one part of its ongoing efforts to protect New Jersey residents from the PFAS group of chemicals, the DEP continues to engage in discussionsand litigation with the companies named in the directive, spokesman Larry Hajna wrote in an email. These are very complex discussions that will take years to resolve in order to address PFAS contamination throughout the state.

Environmental campaigners said the DEPs new prediction that it would take years for any resolution with the chemical companies raised questions about whether it was backing away from its original demands in the face of strong pushback from the chemical industry.

The directive, based on four state environmental laws, said the companies were responsible for significant contamination of New Jerseys natural resources with PFAS chemicals including PFNA (perfluorononanoic acid), PFOS (perfluorooctanesulfonic acid) and PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid), all of which have been linked to illnesses including some cancers, immune-system problems, ulcerative colitis, and elevated cholesterol, according to state and federal studies.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) chemicals, once used in consumer products including Teflon, have been found at higher levels and in more places in New Jersey than in many other states, according to state and federal studies over the last decade. Even though they have been phased out by major U.S. chemical manufacturers, they do not biodegrade, and so represent a continuing threat to public health in waterways and soil. Campaigners call them forever chemicals.

They remain unregulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency which said it would decide by the end of 2019 whether to begin setting enforceable limits for PFOA and PFOS but has not yet done so.

On Jan. 10, the House of Representatives approved a bill that would set a deadline for the EPA to regulate the chemicals.President Trump earlier threatened to veto the billif it reaches his desk. But it may fail in the Republican-controlled Senate, according to one staffer for a New Jersey congressman.

In the absence of federal action, and with growing public concern about water contamination, some states including New Jersey have set strict health limits for some PFAS chemicals in drinking water. The DEP adopted the nations first health standard for PFNA in 2018 and is expected to officially approve limits for PFOS and PFOA soon, under pressure from advocates to do so before a proposed rule on those chemicals expires in April.

In its directive, the DEP named Solvay Specialty Polymers, E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., DuPont Specialty Chemicals, the Chemours Company, and 3M as having caused the contamination. It demanded a full accounting of their use of the chemicals, and ordered them to pay for testing, treatment and cleanup, arguing that that taxpayers, via the DEP, should no longer have to bear that burden.

All five companies denied they were responsible for the alleged contamination and argued that they were not obligated to pay for future cleanup. Lawyers for DuPont and Chemours said the directive was untenable and unsupported by factual findings.

In a letter obtained by NJ Spotlight via an Open Records Act request this month,Solvay denied it was liable under New Jerseys Spill Actfor PFAS contamination near its plant in West Deptford, Gloucester County, and said DEP was being unreasonable by trying to shift the cost of statewide cleanup to Solvay and the other companies.

Solvay, which voluntarily ended its use of PFNA in 2012, said it had been investigating and remediating PFAS chemicals at the site since 2013, and had already spent $25 million on the measures.

3M, in another letter obtained from the OPRA request, said DEP didnt have the statutory authority for some of its demands, and denied it was liable for funding the cleanup under New Jersey law.

Among campaigners raising questions about whether the DEP is backing away from its original demands is Tracy Carluccio, deputy director of the environmental group Delaware Riverkeeper Network, and a longtime advocate for tighter curbs on PFAS.

If New Jersey is wavering under this task and is going to shrink from its lofty announced goal, confidence in the state will be lost and people will pay the price with their health, she said.

The sweeping nature of the DEPs directive suggests it will take time to resolve the matter, and so the public at least deserves an interim report from the state attorney generals office on the status of the talks, Carluccio said.

Thats the only way the public can have confidence that the state is vigorously investigating and staying the course towards making these companies accountable for the widespread contamination they have caused, she said.

She noted that documenting PFAS contamination by DuPont in Parkersburg, West Virginia took plaintiffs attorney Robert Billott some 20 years before winning a series of jury awards for people whose illnesses were linked to the chemicals as described in his recent book Exposure, and the movie Dark Waters.

Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, accused the DEP of failing to follow through on its directive and of now seeking a settlement that will allow corporate polluters to avoid full responsibility.

He argued that the DEP has the authority under the Spill Act to take over contaminated sites and bill the owners for cleanup, but is not acting on that.

Instead of putting force in enforcement, the DEP is hoping to delay and settle, turning this into a farce, Tittel said. They just hope the public doesnt notice. For far too long, companies like Dow and DuPont have gotten away with polluting our state. Unfortunately, it looks like this administration will let them get away with it again.

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N.J. DEPs PFAS directive to chemical companies will take years to resolve - WHYY

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Bill Self considering both data and chemistry while sticking with KU’s two-big starting five | Smithology – KUsports

Kansas forward David McCormack (33) loses control of the ball as he tries to score past Texas forward Kai Jones (22) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) by Associated Press

Anyone out there pondering the pros and cons of the Kansas basketball team continuing to start two bigs even though it ends up playing more four-guard lineups isnt alone.

Bill Self is right there with you.

While the Jayhawks head coach has started sophomore forward David McCormack in 16 of KUs 17 games, Self these days seems more contemplative on the matter.

The way he explained on Monday his recent line of thinking, Self suggested slightly altering the starting five was on his mind this past week. He may have even come closer than ever to switching it up for one of KUs road games at Oklahoma and Texas, but the moving parts gave him pause.

The Jayhawks didnt know for certain going into those games whether sophomore point guard Devon Dotson, who was dealing with a hip pointer, would be able to play. Before the game at UT, Self said, if he decided to start senior guard Isaiah Moss instead of McCormack, and then Dotson wasnt cleared to play, he would have essentially been taking McCormack out of the starting five just to put him right back in. The coach didnt want to mess with his big mans mind with any juggling.

So I thought it was best just to leave a status quo, Self explained, so youre only messing with one guy, as opposed to messing with two.

Dotson, of course, ended up returning and starting at Texas, so Moss, who started in Dotsons place at OU, was the only Jayhawk waiting to find out his role at UT.

The approach worked, as Kansas (14-3 overall, 4-1 Big 12), now ranked No. 3 in the nation, won back-to-back road games. But the fact that he thought so hard about the starting five leads one to wonder whether Selfs more open than ever to making a change.

He said Monday, ahead of KUs Sunflower Showdown with Kansas State at Allen Fieldhouse, he doubted one was imminent. Even so, Self went on to describe a potential benefit of starting Moss.

We know that our five most productive players on the floor is with Isaiah in the lineup, Self said, clarifying that five-man group teams Moss with four other KU starters, Dotson, Marcus Garrett, Ochai Agbaji and Udoka Azubuike. Stats, analytics prove that out.

To Selfs point, in Saturdays win at Texas, that lineup played 15:36 and outscored the Longhorns, 28-18, while committing three turnovers. The starting five, with McCormack on the court instead of Moss, played 7:32, was outscored, 15-10, and turned the ball over once.

McCormack, a 6-foot-10, 265-pound sophomore, still brings a different kind of presence to the floor that Self appreciates. The coach valued the big mans play so much at UT that McCormack logged 20 minutes, a new high for him this season in Big 12 play. The starting forward who so often plays a backups minutes contributed 6 points and seven rebounds.

More importantly, overall, lineups with McCormack worked against Texas. When he was in the game, the Jayhawks outscored UT, 34-24. When McCormack sat, Texas outscored KU, 33-32.

From a chemistry standpoint, I think up until this point its still been best for us to go the way that we've been going, Self said of starting McCormack, because you're still going to have ample opportunities to have that other lineup.

Self wants KU to have experience playing bigger in case the Jayhawks need that type of lineup at some stage of the NCAA Tournament. And while a change to the starting lineup wouldnt make getting those in-game repetitions impossible, its easy to see how it could be less appealing. Self didnt hide the fact that KU has been better with four guards this season. If he removed McCormack from the starting lineup and gave the spot to Moss, carving out time to use two bigs probably isnt going to give KU much of a spark against most teams.

Plus, if KU started four guards around Azubuike and didnt at some point play two bigs, it would become even harder to find McCormack the minutes Self thinks the big man deserves.

Right now, Self is trying to take into account both chemistry and data as best he can.

It's something that I thinks fair, Self said of sticking with McCormack, and I've actually thought quite a bit about.

To McCormacks credit, hes amenable to his coachs instincts, even when those lead Self to play smaller. At Texas, KU opened the second half with its best four-guard look, and Moss in for McCormack.

Same approach as always, McCormack said of the eight minutes he spent as essentially a second-half reserve. Control what you can control. Coach felt like it was a better lineup, like going smaller would give us a better chance to win. And thats what I want. I want the benefit of the team. And, you know, its not the first time that hes done that. So I just stick to it and give myself up for the team.

Happy with McCormacks play at Texas, Self said it was an example of why people shouldnt get hung up on starting roles, based on how a certain player performs in one game, because McCormack was probably better than Moss versus the Longhorns.

He just has a different type of role, Self said of his sophomore big man. But I know what I hope for, and it doesn't have anything to do with who starts. It has everything to do with how are we able to be successful playing two bigs? Because we're going to some. And then how do we maximize the opportunity to play small, which we have to the majority of time?

Moss (24.8 minutes a game in Big 12 play, 23.2 minutes on the season) is playing more than McCormack (14.6 minutes in the Big 12, 16.3 overall) anyway. Swapping one out for the other in the starting five isnt going to change that.

Were still going through the process of trying to figure that out, Self said of finding the proper combination of two-big and four-guard lineups, but I do think getting some offense off the bench (Moss is averaging 8.1 points per game this year) hasnt been bad for us.

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Bill Self considering both data and chemistry while sticking with KU's two-big starting five | Smithology - KUsports

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My Chemical Romance An Offering… team tease suggests more to come – Alternative Press

My Chemical Romance launched a mysterious short film and announced a U.K. show just two days ago. Previously they teased what may be a U.S. tour and have in general, been incredibly cryptic about anything they do. Its so bad, fans are scouring the internet for anything that might reveal the next clue, not even the next answer.

We might have found something now that gives a bit of detail about the puzzling video that announced the Milton-Keynes show. Thanks to the magic of social media, we know speculate there may be more to this specific teaser.

My Chemical Romance just love to string us along. It makes sense, theyve had quite a few years to develop a gameplan. From time-traveling blog posts to tiny details in outfits; and from vampires and hospital beds to even ending their first show with well carry on instead of son long and goodnight. Weve stuck through it all.

With the UK show announcement and An Offering video released on Jan. 19, fans now have two minutes and twenty seconds of content to analyze and it has spawned some pretty crazy ideas.

An Offering released Jan. 19 and seems to be a major tease of what is to come. It seems odd that a two minute video would be put together justto announce a show in the UK. There has to be something more. The main theory is that the song in the background is the first track from a new album. It does feel very much like Romance from My Chems first recordI Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love.

In the video we see the main figures cape features a crucifix-like symbol on the back as they move through the woods with several other cloaked figures. While not identical, the symbol looks very close tothe MCRX onethat launched a whole slew of reunion theories in 2016. The band soon clarified that itwasnt a reunion(at least not yet) and just a10-year annivesary reissue ofThe Black Parade.

In the new video, the main figure sees Big Ben reflected in a body of water, foreshadowing the announcement to come. Eventually, they join three others around a pentagon to complete a spirit circle for a summoning as a chant can be heard through the clips end. All of the imageryfurther supports theories surrounding a Wicca-inspired new era.

As the screen goes to black, another show announcement appears, adding to the handful planned for 2020 (andconfirming that June theory). Theyll be playing in Milton Keynes, U.K. atStadium MKon June 20, 2020. The band hasnt released ticketing details, but U.K. concert promoter Johnny Phillipshas stated it will be live Jan. 24 at 9:30 a.m. GMT with no presale. Watch An Offering below.

So, as stated, it is very weird if this wonderful production was put together just to announce one show in the UK. This is where social media jumps in.

Who we believe to be a head director or producer of the promo Kristian Mercado Figueroa posted on his Instagram story, tagging My Chemical Romance in reference to An Offering saying Part 1 finally drop!!! Specifically saying part one usually implies that there are multiple parts to something. if this is just part one, what do the other parts entail? Do we get more of the story and more show announcements? Are the characters in the video hopping through portals into different dimensions so maybe well see different locations in the coming parts? Who knows? Its a mystery only we can hope to solve. Look at the picture below.

He also posted a series of photos from the promo on his Instagram with the following caption.

UK announcement is here! Peek the new visual.Thanks to the team behind this and all the creativesNo spoilersbut haha this is just a taste.

The second big piece of news to come from social media is that another person affiliated with the video posted a picture showing some objects that we didnt see in An Offering Either, the scenes showing these objects just wound up on the cutting room floor, or theres more to come. The objects feature the symbols that My Chemical Romance launched their return with. The text also states tour announcement and not show announcement which also implies more to come.

Just like most news after a My Chemical Romance post, were left with more questions than answers. The only way well know more is when they tell us. Until then, well carry on.

Tell us your My Chemical Romance theories in the comments below!

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My Chemical Romance An Offering... team tease suggests more to come - Alternative Press

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DEPs PFAS Directive to Chemical Companies Will Take Years to Resolve – NJ Spotlight

DEP spokesman says, These are very complex discussions that will take years to resolve

The state Department of Environmental Protection says it will take years to resolve its dispute with five chemical companies which it has accused of contaminating many areas of New Jersey with toxic PFAS chemicals.

Some nine months after issuing a strongly worded Directive to the companies to test, treat and remove the chemicals from soil and water around their facilities, the DEP issued a statement on Jan. 17 in response to a question from NJ Spotlight on why it had said nothing publicly about the initiative since announcing it in March 2019.

As one part of its ongoing efforts to protect New Jersey residents from the PFAS group of chemicals, the DEP continues to engage in discussionsand litigation with the companies named in the directive, spokesman Larry Hajna wrote in an email. These are very complex discussions that will take years to resolve in order to address PFAS contamination throughout the state.

Environmental campaigners said the DEPs new prediction that it would take years for any resolution with the chemical companies raised questions about whether it was backing away from its original demands in the face of strong pushback from the chemical industry.

The directive, based on four state environmental laws, said the companies were responsible for significant contamination of New Jerseys natural resources with PFAS chemicals including PFNA (perfluorononanoic acid), PFOS (perfluorooctanesulfonic acid) and PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid), all of which have been linked to illnesses including some cancers, immune-system problems, ulcerative colitis, and elevated cholesterol, according to state and federal studies.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) chemicals, once used in consumer products including Teflon, have been found at higher levels and in more places in New Jersey than in many other states, according to state and federal studies over the last decade. Even though they have been phased out by major U.S. chemical manufacturers, they do not biodegrade, and so represent a continuing threat to public health in waterways and soil. Campaigners call them forever chemicals.

They remain unregulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency which said it would decide by the end of 2019 whether to begin setting enforceable limits for PFOA and PFOS but has not yet done so.

On Jan. 10, the House of Representatives approved a bill that would set a deadline for the EPA to regulate the chemicals. President Trump earlier threatened to veto the bill if it reaches his desk. But it may fail in the Republican-controlled Senate, according to one staffer for a New Jersey congressman.

In the absence of federal action, and with growing public concern about water contamination, some states including New Jersey have set strict health limits for some PFAS chemicals in drinking water. The DEP adopted the nations first health standard for PFNA in 2018 and is expected to officially approve limits for PFOS and PFOA soon, under pressure from advocates to do so before a proposed rule on those chemicals expires in April.

In its directive, the DEP named Solvay Specialty Polymers, E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., DuPont Specialty Chemicals, the Chemours Company, and 3M as having caused the contamination. It demanded a full accounting of their use of the chemicals, and ordered them to pay for testing, treatment and cleanup, arguing that that taxpayers, via the DEP, should no longer have to bear that burden.

All five companies denied they were responsible for the alleged contamination and argued that they were not obligated to pay for future cleanup. Lawyers for DuPont and Chemours said the directive was untenable and unsupported by factual findings.

In a letter obtained by NJ Spotlight via an Open Records Act request this month, Solvay denied it was liable under New Jerseys Spill Act for PFAS contamination near its plant in West Deptford, Gloucester County, and said DEP was being unreasonable by trying to shift the cost of statewide cleanup to Solvay and the other companies.

Solvay, which voluntarily ended its use of PFNA in 2012, said it had been investigating and remediating PFAS chemicals at the site since 2013, and had already spent $25 million on the measures.

3M, in another letter obtained from the OPRA request, said DEP didnt have the statutory authority for some of its demands, and denied it was liable for funding the cleanup under New Jersey law.

Among campaigners raising questions about whether the DEP is backing away from its original demands is Tracy Carluccio, deputy director of the environmental group Delaware Riverkeeper Network, and a longtime advocate for tighter curbs on PFAS.

If New Jersey is wavering under this task and is going to shrink from its lofty announced goal, confidence in the state will be lost and people will pay the price with their health, she said.

The sweeping nature of the DEPs directive suggests it will take time to resolve the matter, and so the public at least deserves an interim report from the state attorney generals office on the status of the talks, Carluccio said.

Thats the only way the public can have confidence that the state is vigorously investigating and staying the course towards making these companies accountable for the widespread contamination they have caused, she said.

She noted that documenting PFAS contamination by DuPont in Parkersburg, West Virginia took plaintiffs attorney Robert Billott some 20 years before winning a series of jury awards for people whose illnesses were linked to the chemicals as described in his recent book Exposure, and the movie Dark Waters.

Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, accused the DEP of failing to follow through on its directive and of now seeking a settlement that will allow corporate polluters to avoid full responsibility.

He argued that the DEP has the authority under the Spill Act to take over contaminated sites and bill the owners for cleanup, but is not acting on that.

Instead of putting force in enforcement, the DEP is hoping to delay and settle, turning this into a farce, Tittel said. They just hope the public doesnt notice. For far too long, companies like Dow and DuPont have gotten away with polluting our state. Unfortunately, it looks like this administration will let them get away with it again.

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Long Island school closed over chemical fears – FOX 5 NY

Northport MS closed

Over the weekend, the district announced the relocation of students and staff from Northport Middle School for the rest of the year.

NORTHPORT, N.Y. - Alexa Valentino graduated from Northport Middle Schoolin Suffolk County two years ago. She remembers frequently feeling sick and leaving early.

"The next day after a rainy day, not only was the building flooding and disgustingbut the smell, I don't even know how to explain it," Valentino said. "Just a rotten smell."

Many of her classes were held in the G-wing, an area of the school that's been closed off to students and staff since mid-December amidst the discovery of high levels of mercury found outside the classrooms in a leaching pool.

But additional septic tanks recently tested positive for benzene, a potentially dangerous chemical compound that could cause headaches, confusion and even cancer.

Over the weekend, the district announced the relocation of students and staff for the rest of the year.

John Kobel taught science and technology at the school for more than 20 years. He now has heavy metal poisoning, skin and prostate cancer, and is relying on medication to stay alive.

"I take five in the morning, five at night," he said. "I'm on two inhalers and I'm on allergy shots."

Classes will be canceled for Northport Middle School on Tuesday and Wednesday. In a letter to the district, the superintendent said the move is in the best interest of the students and staff.

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Local leaders are calling on the state to assist with emergency funding to help with the transition.

"We can always look back but the more important thing now is to make sure our children, students, faculty are safe and they're getting the education that they really need," state Sen. Jim Gaughran said.

Parent Nicole Mulholland said it will be a trying transition.

"At first it was 'Yay there's no school for a few days,' then it sets in, like my school is gone, who will I be with? What friends will I be with? I'm going to a new place," she said. "This is scary. There's nothing easy about this process."

Parents who have fought to close the school plan to get together to provide emotional support to children and teachers throughout the week. They will also be looking into a feasibility study to see if reopening the school is realistic.

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Long Island school closed over chemical fears - FOX 5 NY

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