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Hypothyroidism-Symptoms – WebMD

Symptoms of hypothyroidism usually appear slowly over months or years. Symptoms and signs may include:

Some less common symptoms may include:

In general, how bad your symptoms are depends on your age, how long you have had hypothyroidism, and the seriousness of the condition. The symptoms may be so mild and happen so slowly that they go unnoticed for years.

Mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism often causes no symptoms or vague symptoms that may be attributed to aging, such as memory problems, dry skin, and fatigue.

Symptoms of hypothyroidism during and after pregnancy include fatigue, weight loss, dizziness, depression, and memory and concentration problems.

Because of the range of symptoms, hypothyroidism can be mistaken for depression, especially during and after pregnancy. In older people, it may be confused with Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and other conditions that cause memory problems.

Although rare, hypothyroidism can occur in infants, children, and teens. In infants, symptoms of a goiter include a poor appetite and choking on food. Symptoms of hypothyroidism may include dry, scaly skin. In children and teens, symptoms include behavior problems and changes in school performance. Children and teens may gain weight and yet have a slowed growth rate. Teens may have delayed puberty and look much younger than their age.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

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Hypothyroidism Symptoms – Endocrine Diseases: thyroid …

The most common thyroid disorder is hypothyroidism. Hypo- means deficient or under(active), so hypothyroidism is an underactive thyroid gland. Recognizing the symptoms of hypothyroidism is extremely important. The sooner you detect the symptoms, the sooner you can receive proper treatment to manage the disorder.

Common Symptoms of Hypothyroidism Below are major symptoms associated with hypothyroidism.

You don't have to encounter every one of these symptoms to be diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Every patient's experience with the disorder is different. While you may notice that your skin and hair have become dry and rough, another patient may be plagued more by fatigue and depression.

The thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level reflects the severity of the hypothyroidism. For example, if you have a mild form of hypothyroidism and a relatively lower TSH level, you may not noticeor even havesymptoms. That's because your hormone levels haven't decreased to the point where they have a major impact on your metabolism. The more hypothyroid you become, the more symptomatic you'll be.

The symptoms of hypothyroidism aren't always noticeable, but it's important that you understand what to look out for. Recognizing hypothyroidism early on will allow you to manage the disorder and prevent it from interfering with your life.

Updated on: 06/02/14

Causes of Hypothyroidism

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Hypothyroidism | American Thyroid Association

There can be many reasons why the cells in the thyroid gland cant make enough thyroid hormone. Here are the major causes, from the most to the least common:

Autoimmune disease. In some peoples bodies, the immune system that protects the body from invading infections can mistake thyroid gland cells and their enzymes for invaders and can attack them. Then there arent enough thyroid cells and enzymes left to make enough thyroid hormone. This is more common in women than men. Autoimmune thyroiditis can begin suddenly or it can develop slowly over years. The most common forms are Hashimotos thyroiditis and atrophic thyroiditis.

Surgical removal of part or all of the thyroid gland. Some people with thyroid nodules, thyroid cancer, or Graves disease need to have part or all of their thyroid removed. If the whole thyroid is removed, people will definitely become hypothyroid. If part of the gland is left, it may be able to make enough thyroid hormone to keep blood levels normal.

Radiation treatment. Some people with Graves disease, nodular goiter, or thyroid cancer are treated with radioactive iodine (I-131) for the purpose of destroying their thyroid gland. Patients with Hodgkins disease, lymphoma, or cancers of the head or neck are treated with radiation. All these patients can lose part or all of their thyroid function.

Congenital hypothyroidism (hypothyroidism that a baby is born with). A few babies are born without a thyroid or with only a partly formed one. A few have part or all of their thyroid in the wrong place (ectopic thyroid). In some babies, the thyroid cells or their enzymes dont work right.

Thyroiditis. Thyroiditis is an inflammation of the thyroid gland, usually caused by an autoimmune attack or by a viral infection. Thyroiditis can make the thyroid dump its whole supply of stored thyroid hormone into the blood at once, causing brief hyperthyroidism (too much thyroid activity); then the thyroid becomes underactive.

Medicines. Medicines such as amiodarone, lithium, interferon alpha, and interleukin-2 can prevent the thyroid gland from being able to make hormone normally. These drugs are most likely to trigger hypothyroidism in patients who have a genetic tendency to autoimmune thyroid disease.

Too much or too little iodine. The thyroid gland must have iodine to make thyroid hormone. Iodine comes into the body in food and travels through the blood to the thyroid. Keeping thyroid hormone production in balance requires the right amount of iodine. Taking in too much iodine can cause or worsen hypothyroidism.

Damage to the pituitary gland. The pituitary, the master gland, tells the thyroid how much hormone to make. When the pituitary is damaged by a tumor, radiation, or surgery, it may no longer be able to give the thyroid instructions and the thyroid may stop making enough hormone.

Rare disorders that infiltrate the thyroid. In a few people, diseases deposit abnormal substances in the thyroid and impair its ability to function. For example, amyloidosis can deposit amyloid protein, sarcoidosis can deposit granulomas, and hemochromatosis can deposit iron.

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Hyperthyroidism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Hypothyroidism Type 2: The Epidemic: 9780975262405 …

Review

Dr. Starr has written clear and understandable explanation of why so many people today are suffering from hypothyroidism, despite normal blood test that throw their doctors off the track. Having successfully treated several thousand type 2 hypothyroid patients myself over 23 years practice and watching them return to normal health, I applaud Dr. Starr s work which will hopefully reach many of those who are suffering so they can get help. His in-depth research and discussion of how environmental toxins can interfere with thyroid hormones is groundbreaking and enlightening for us all. Bravo Mark! --Robban Sica, M.D.

I believe everyone needs to review Mark Starr s book. He has a vital message to share about the many people who do not realize they have low thyroid, because standard thyroid tests do not show it. Mark Starr s dedication to research, and his devoted study with the old masters, have made him an international expert on thyroid and iodine. ---- Garry Gordon, M.D., D.O., M.D.(H)

I believe everyone needs to review Mark Starr s book. He has a vital message to share about the many people who do not realize they have low thyroid, because standard thyroid tests do not show it. Mark Starr s dedication to research, and his devoted study with the old masters, have made him an international expert on thyroid and iodine. --Garry Gordon, M.D., D.O., M.D.(H)

I believe everyone needs to review Mark Starr s book. He has a vital message to share about the many people who do not realize they have low thyroid, because standard thyroid tests do not show it. Mark Starr s dedication to research, and his devoted study with the old masters, have made him an international expert on thyroid and iodine. --Garry Gordon, M.D., D.O., M.D.(H)

I believe everyone needs to review Mark Starr s book. He has a vital message to share about the many people who do not realize they have low thyroid, because standard thyroid tests do not show it. Mark Starr s dedication to research, and his devoted study with the old masters, have made him an international expert on thyroid and iodine. --Garry Gordon, M.D., D.O., M.D.(H)

As a Diplomat of the American Board of Pain Medicine and Fellow of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dr. Starr delivered lectures at International Courses on Musculoskeletal Pain and Fibromyalgia. The courses were held at Mt. Sinai Hospital and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. He is a life member of the national registry of Who's Who published in the 1999 edition. Dr. Mark Starr finished his residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Missouri, Rusk Rehabilitation Center in 1994. The following two years, he studied in New York City with several of the world's premier pain specialists: Hans Kraus, MD, Norman Marcus, MD. Lawrence Sonkin, MD, PhD, and Andrew A Fischer, MD, PhD. Initially, Dr. Starr worked eighteen months at the Bronx Veteran's Hospital with Dr. Fischer, the renowned musculoskeletal pain specialist, author, lecturer, and former student of Hans Kraus. Following his work with Dr. Fischer, Dr. Starr studied at the New York Pain Treatment Program at Lenox Hill Hospital, with Drs. Kraus and Marcus. Dr. Starr was treated by and studied under Dr. Sonkin, the New York Cornell Endocrinologist, who worked closely with Dr. Kraus for thirty years. Dr. Kraus' books included Therapeutic Exercise, Backache, Stress, and Tension, The Sports Injury Handbook, and Diagnosis and Treatment of Muscle Pain. Dr. Starr has been in private practice since 1996. He has attended American Academy of Anti-aging Meetings & American Academy of Environmental Medicine meetings. Dr. Starr is involved in clinical studies on the relationship and treatment of hormone imbalances, heavy metal toxicity, Candidiasis, chemical sensitivities, chronic fatigue, and pain. He is adept at maximizing health through natural hormone therapies.

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Hypothyroidism: Causes, Symptoms, & Treatment

What is Hypothyroidism?

The thyroid gland is an important endocrine gland that controls the bodys metabolism. It is a small butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck just below the Adams apple. The thyroid gland produces the hormones tetraiodothyronine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).

Together these hormones regulate how your cells use energy. The pathways by which cells use energy is called metabolism. Your bodys general metabolism determines blood pressure, heart rate, and weight.

Hypothyroidism is a condition where your thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone. Low levels of thyroid hormone interfere with the bodys ability to perform normal metabolic functions such as efficient use of energy from food products, regulation of many chemical reactions in the body, and maintenance of healthy cells, bones and muscles, to name a few.

There is no known prevention for hypothyroidism, nor is there a cure. Once you have it, you have it for life.

The most common causes are surgical removal of your thyroid, autoimmune diseases, and radiation treatment.

This may be necessary to treat hyperthyroidism, or tumors of the thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism will occur when the entire gland is removed.

These diseases cause the production of antibodies that attack your thyroid gland. Autoimmune thyroiditis, which can appear suddenly or develop over several years, is more common in women. Hashimotos thyroiditis and atrophic thyroiditis are the most common types.

Radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma and cancers of the head and neck can injure the thyroid gland. If this occurs, the gland cannot produce enough thyroid hormone to keep your metabolism running smoothly. Radioactive iodine (I-131) destroys the thyroid gland and can be used to treat people with Graves disease and thyroid cancer. Graves disease is an autoimmune disease that causes hyperthyroidism.

Some children are born without a thyroid gland or they may have one that doesnt function properly.

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Hypothyroidism: Causes, Symptoms, & Treatment

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