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CSCs responsible for metastasis identified

Posted: June 6, 2010 at 8:16 am

Cancer stem cells responsible for metastasis identified: HK study, Xinhua News Agency, June 4, 2010. Excerpt:

Hong Kong researchers have identified a subset of cancer stem cells responsible for metastasis in human colorectal cancer which can help better predict the prognosis and design a more suitable treatment for patients, according to a study made public by the University of Hong Kong on Friday.

The researchers from the university’s medicine school discovered that cancer stem cells with a surface marker CD26, which marks a subset of cancer stem cells with metastatic capacity, are present in all terminal colon cancer cells and all metastatic cancer cells.

This news item is about the publication: A Subpopulation of CD26+ Cancer Stem Cells with Metastatic Capacity in Human Colorectal Cancer by Roberta Pang and 13 co-authors, including Wai Lun Law, Ronnie T Poon and Benjamin CY Wong [photos of authors], Cell Stem Cell 2010(Jun 4); 6(6): 603-15. [Summary][Twitter entry][Commentary][FriendFeed entry][Science Pond entry].

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

Evolution of Type

Posted: June 6, 2010 at 8:15 am

Andreas Scheiger

Love it!  Check out more of Andreas Scheiger’s work here.

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

Hyperbole / Rhetorical Exaggerations

Posted: June 6, 2010 at 8:15 am

From Alcor’s Second Amended Complaint (against Johnson, et. al.), dated December 30, 1999:

133. The statements made and published by the Defendants was done with the intent and purpose of injuring and discrediting ALCOR and did subject ALCOR to public ridicule and contempt, including persons who stated in the public domain that they “believed every word of it.” http://www.alcor.org/Library/pdfs/NewYorkComplaintAmendedJan2010.pdf

I believe Alcor is quoting me, in the above complaint, against Johnson et. al. If they are not, they might as well be, because I believe I wrote that exact statement, (which was subsequently edited), in a book review, on Amazon.com. Regardless of whom they are quoting, let’s compare two readers of the same book:

“Reader A” believes most of the author’s firsthand accounts of events, in the book, to be true, because she had similar experiences, while working with some of the same people as the author. “Person A” also believes the author’s repetition of secondhand stories to be a fairly accurate reflection of stories, which were told to him, because “Person A” heard some of the same stories, from other people, prior to the book being published, and without knowing the author, (in fact, while thinking the author was deceased).

“Person B,” who frequently works with organizations and persons criticized in the book, believes much of the information in the book to be false.

Aren’t Person A’s comment, that she “believes every word” of the book, and Person B’s comment, that he thinks the book is “400 pages of lies,” similar in that they are hyperbolic statements/rhetorical exaggerations? (Let’s face it, both of those are unlikely to be entirely accurate, which is why I (“Person A”) edited my remark, soon after making it.)

If Alcor’s attorneys are quoting me, do they plan on telling the judge that the person who believes most of what is in the book to be, basically, true is a medical professional, experienced in hypothermic procedures, who worked in cryonics, or do they want the judge to believe the comment came from someone who may have been a potential Alcor client? If they are quoting me, do they plan on telling the judge the person who made the statements publicly made many harsh statements, regarding what she believes to be unethical and unprofessional activities, in cryonics, including some connected to Alcor and/or people with strong ties to Alcor, prior to reading the book?

If people are going to quote me, please put my comments in the proper context. At Suspended Animation, I worked with two of the same people, who worked with Mr. Johnson, at Alcor. Some of Mr. Johnson’s experiences, while working in cryonics, were similar to my own, and I heard some of the secondhand stories he printed, from people working with me, at Suspended Animation. For the most part, the Johnson/Baldyga book only reinforced opinions I had already formed, before the book was published.

I think it’s also important to note that Person A (I) made my comments in an informal book review, on Amazon.com, while Person B, (Dr. Brian Wowk of 21st Century Medicine), made his comments in a legal setting, under oath.

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

Brain Develops Differently in Fragile X Syndrome

Posted: June 6, 2010 at 8:15 am

(HealthDay News) — Brain development in very young boys with fragile X syndrome differs from that in boys without the genetic disorder, a new study has found.

Fragile X syndrome, which is triggered by a mutation in a gene on the X chromosome, is the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism. Though the syndrome affects about one in every 4,000 people, males with the disorder experience more significant symptoms than females.

U.S. researchers used high-resolution MRI to monitor long-term changes that differentiated the brain anatomy of 41 boys with fragile X syndrome and a control group of 21 healthy boys and seven other children who were experiencing developmental delays not caused by fragile X syndrome. Read more…

Immunice for Immune Support

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

Are Almonds a Good Source of Calcium?

Posted: June 5, 2010 at 8:15 am

Over all, you would still get some calcium by eating almonds, but at a lot higher calorie cost than from other foods, like milk.

The amount of calcium in a cup of whole almonds, 378 milligrams, is slightly more than in a cup of milk, about 300 milligrams, but you would be consuming about eight times as many calories.

References:
Q and A – Almonds for Calcium? – Question – NYTimes.com.

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

Anatomic Fashion Friday: Hipster Heart Tee

Posted: June 5, 2010 at 8:15 am

Anatomical heart t-shirt by Dark Cycle Clothing

Anatomical heart t-shirt by Dark Cycle Clothing

Get the message out to the world that you’re deeply emotional but don’t really give-a-damn with this low v-neck anatomical heart shirt by Dark Cycle Clothing.   I love the texture and size of the heart!  They hand illustrated, digitally altered, and then screen printed it through a high mesh screen using metallic silver ink.  The shirt itself looks nice and soft too.  It’s a win win!

Available for $20.00 via Etsy.

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith


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