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3D Systems and United Therapeutics to Develop 3D Printing Biotechnology for Solid-Organ Scaffolds – 3DPrint.com

Posted: April 27, 2017 at 7:44 am

No matter how many times I read or write about it, I am still overwhelmed and amazed when I see what 3D printing technology is currently able to do for the medical field, and what it has the potential to do down the line. Today, 3D Systems, a company thats nearly synonymous with precision healthcare capabilities, and biotechnology company United Therapeutics Corporation announced a joint plan to develop solid-organ scaffolds for use in human transplants. The multi-year development and collaboration is a good fit, combining 3D Systemshealthcare and 3D printing expertise with the organ manufacturing and regenerative medicine proficiency of United Therapeutics, which is also a member of the consortium that makes up the Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Manufacturing USA Institute.

Vyomesh Joshi, CEO of 3D Systems, said, As a global leader in healthcare solutions, we are part of many developments and applications for 3D printing coming together including bioprinting.We believe bioprinting is a powerful opportunity and we are uniquely positioned with the broadest portfolio of technologies to partner with companies of the caliber of United Therapeutics to provide healthcare solutions of the future.

In addition to collaborating with United Therapeutics, which is focused on developing and commercializing products that address the medical needs of patients living with chronic and life-threatening conditions, 3D Systems will also work with its organ manufacturing and transplantation-focused subsidiary, Lung Biotechnology PBC, which is the first public benefit corporation subsidiary of a public biotechnology or pharmaceutical company.

Through several technologies that expand the supply or delay the need for transplantable organs, Lung Biotechnology PBC addresses head-on the critical shortage of transplantable lungs, and other organs, in the US. Withthe subsidiary also on board with the 3D Systems collaboration, an additional technology alternative can be added to United Therapeutics pursuit of an unlimited supply of organs for human transplantation.

Dr. Martine Rothblatt, PhD, Chairman and CEO of United Therapeutics, said, Our Lung Biotechnology public benefit corporation is taking personal regenerative medicine to its highest level yet with this practical, economic solution to a major health care problem.Indeed, we expect one personalized organ transplant will avoid years of health care spending on palliative medical therapies.

The focus of the joint bioprinting agreement is to develop 3D printing systems for solid-organ scaffolds, and with Lung Biotechnology PBCs participation, obviously the first thing the companies will tackle is lung scaffolds. Scaffolds are an important part of the bioprinting process, as they give printed cells, and organs, a structure to develop and grow on. So determining the correct way to create a scaffold is incredibly important to the success of these endeavors.

Combiningthe resources of United Therapeutics and 3D Systems transforms our capability to tackle this difficult challenge.This project will be based out of our new bioprinting lab in San Diego, CA, and will rely on expertise across many technical disciplines within 3D Systems as well as the domain knowledge of our technical partners at Lung Biotechnology PBC, said Chuck Hull, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for 3D Systems.

The 3D printing system that 3D Systems and United Therapeutics hope to create will be targeting collagen, along with other building block proteins, as the raw materials for the scaffolds themselves. In turn, Lung Biotechnology PBC will then celluralize the scaffolds using patient-specific biological material, which includes re-differentiated stem cells.

Our partnership with 3D Systems is a major step forward in creating an unlimited supply of tolerable transplanted organs.By cellularizing scaffolds created with 3D Systems printers with a patients own cells, there will no longer be a need for immunosuppression and a vastly greater number of patients can extend their enjoyment of life through organ transplantation, said Dr. Rothblatt.

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3D Systems and United Therapeutics to Develop 3D Printing Biotechnology for Solid-Organ Scaffolds – 3DPrint.com

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

SSCI Receives a 2017 Biotechnology Award for Global Research and Manufacturing – Yahoo Finance

Posted: April 27, 2017 at 7:44 am

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind., April 26, 2017 /PRNewswire/ –SSCI, a division of Albany Molecular Research Inc. (AMRI), has been recognized by Global Health & Pharma (GHP) magazine as the winner of the 2017 Biotechnology Award for Best Global Research & Manufacturing Company in the United States.

“I am truly honored to accept this award on behalf of our dedicated team that is deeply committed to the mission of helping our clients achieve their product development goals and generate valuable intellectual property day in and day out,” said David A. Engers, Ph.D., general manager at SSCI. “We are grateful to GHP for recognizing our commitment to client service and data integrity in order to provide unmatched value to the industries we have served for more than a quarter century.”

GHP magazine recognizes that the biotechnology industry is increasingly viewed as being the frontline of medical science, and as this movement continues to gain momentum the publication is committed to following the most game-changing advances and revolutionary developments that will form the healthcare world for years to come.

Nathan Angell, GHP awards coordinator, expressed pride in every one of the award winners, “This award recognizes the hard work and dedication of the firms, such as SSCI, and the individuals behind them, that are driving innovation in this vital market. It has been my honor to recognize these dedicated professionals and I would like to wish them the very best of fortunes for the future.”

About SSCIAMRI SSCI, LLC (SSCI), a division of AMRI, provides industry leading contract solid-state and analytical testing services and exists to help companies in the pharmaceutical, food, agrochemical, and other chemical industries develop better products and get them to market more quickly. SSCI provides comprehensive cGMP research and analytical services in the characterization and chemistry of solid materials, with particular expertise in small and large molecules being investigated for pharmaceutical use.To learn more about SSCI’s solid-state and analytical chemistry services and capabilities,please contact 1-800-375-2179 | http://www.ssci-inc.com.

About GHP MagazineGlobal Health and Pharma (GHP) magazine is a global, information-sharing platform and a multi-disciplinary members community. The publication was established to enhance communication networks and collaboration across all themes and disciplines within three main categories; Human, Animal and Environmental Health.

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ssci-receives-a-2017-biotechnology-award-for-global-research-and-manufacturing-300445541.html

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SSCI Receives a 2017 Biotechnology Award for Global Research and Manufacturing – Yahoo Finance

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

Use of biotechnology must to attain food security: Bosan | Pakistan … – Pakistan Today

Posted: April 27, 2017 at 7:44 am

Around 130 national and international academicians and scientists hailing from seven different countries including Turkey, Tunisia, Sudan, Iran, Sri Lanka, and Uzbekistan attended a workshop held here to promote the safe use of modern biotechnology to attain the goal of food security and defeating hunger and poverty.

Minister for Food Security and Research Sikandar Hayat Khan Bosan inaugurated the 3rd International Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Biotechnology on Wednesday.

The 2-day event being held at the National Agriculture Research Center, Islamabad, is jointly organised by Commission on Science and Technology for Sustainable Development in the South (COMSATS), ISESCO and Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC).

Addressing the audiences, the minister said that it was time that the countries of the region should encourage and support smart agricultural practices.

He said safe use of modern biotechnology was needed to enhance agricultural production and get rid of malnutrition and starvation. The minister pledged full support for agricultural production which was the backbone of economy with sustainable food security.

Dr Ghulam Muhammad Ali, Member Coordination and Monitoring, PARC, Islamabad, noted that advances in science and technology were the need of time for food security and safety. Noting the hunger still prevailing in various parts of the world, he opined that biotechnology was the basis of production of vast variety of transgenic and genetically modified crops which can solve the problem of hunger.

He said that the conference having similar agenda was good for the developing countries as it would open ways for research, collaboration and capacity building.

Speaking on the occasion, Dr Kauser Malik, Department of Biological Sciences, FC College Lahore, mentioned that it was our fear of unknown that kept the human beings away from adapting new technologies and advocated the use of genetically modified crops for addressing hunger.

In his message, Dr SM Junaid Zaidi, Executive Director COMSATS, said that despite major developments around the globe, many areas struggle with challenges of starvation and malnutrition. Even the developed countries cannot engage in bigger pursuits without ensuring food security. Mentioning the importance of biotechnology in agriculture, he noted that biotechnological influence on food production and agriculture is undeniable especially for countries like Pakistan with fertile lands and good weather conditions.

The message from Director General ISESCO, HE Dr. Abdulaziz Othman Altwaijri, noted that there was a dire need to provide an enriching and engaging environment to foster crop science research towards new and improved livelihood opportunities and sustainable food security. He considered collaborations in this regard necessary and appreciated the cooperation between ISESCO and COMSATS.

Shields were given to the esteemed participants who came from different countries for the conference.

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Use of biotechnology must to attain food security: Bosan | Pakistan … – Pakistan Today

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

3D Systems and United Therapeutics partner to 3D print organ scaffolds for human transplants – TCT Magazine

Posted: April 27, 2017 at 7:44 am

3D Systems has announced a bioprinting agreement with United Therapeutics which will see the two companies develop solid-organ scaffolds for human transplants with 3D printing.

Combining their respective expertise in 3D printing and regenerative medicine and organ manufacturing, the collaboration will remain for a number of years.

The agreement will pit 3D Systems personnel alongside professionals from a United Therapeutics subsidiary, Lung Biotechnology PBC. Since the collaboration will primarily focus on the development of 3D printing systems for solid-organ lung scaffolds, Lung Biotechnology PBC is seen as best placed to work with 3D Systems.

The printing system will target collagen, and other building block proteins, as scaffold raw materials. Lung Biotechnology PBC will cellularize the scaffolds with patient-specific biological material, including re-differentiated stem cells.

Our partnership with 3D Systems is a major step forward in creating an unlimited supply of tolerable transplanted organs, said Martine Rothblatt, Ph.D., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of United Therapeutics. By cellularizing scaffolds created with 3D Systems printers with a patients own cells, there will no longer be a need for immunosuppression and a vastly greater number of patients can extend their enjoyment of life through organ transplantation.

3D Systems is a company with a wealth of experience in the medical sector. Its precision healthcare capabilities include simulation, virtual surgical planning, and the printing of medical and dental devices. Two of 3D Systems leading executives are not only confident in their companys own knowledge of the medical 3D printing sector, but also of United Therapeutics own expertise. Though conceding the challenge is not straight forward, the pair foresee new solutions being born from the partnership.

As a global leader in healthcare solutions, we are part of many developments and applications for 3D printing coming together including bioprinting, said Vyomesh Joshi, Chief Executive Officer, 3D Systems. We believe bioprinting is a powerful opportunity and we are uniquely positioned with the broadest portfolio of technologies to partner with companies of the calibre of United Therapeutics to provide healthcare solutions of the future.

Chuck Hull, Executive Vice President, Chief Technology Officer, 3D Systems, added: Combining the resources of United Therapeutics and 3D Systems transforms our capability to tackle this difficult challenge. This project will be based out of our new bioprinting lab in San Diego, CA, and will rely on expertise across many technical disciplines within 3D Systems as well as the domain knowledge of our technical partners at Lung Biotechnology PBC.

Meanwhile, the collaboration and joint development will add another technology alternative to United Therapeutics pursuit of an unlimited supply of organs for human transplantation.

Dr Rothblatt concludes: Our Lung Biotechnology public benefit corporation is taking personal regenerative medicine to its highest level yet with this practical, economic solution to a major health care program. Indeed, we expect one personalised organ transplant will avoid years of health care spending on palliative medical therapies.

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3D Systems and United Therapeutics partner to 3D print organ scaffolds for human transplants – TCT Magazine

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

United States Biotechnology Industry – Porter’s Five Forces Strategy … – Business Wire (press release)

Posted: April 27, 2017 at 7:44 am

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “United States Biotechnology Industry – Porter’s Five Forces Strategy Analysis” report to their offering.

The rapidly emerging biotechnology industry is a critical element of national power. Advances in biotechnology are resulting in novel biomedical and pharmaceutical products and processes that are relieving human suffering, improving health, and increasing the quality of life for the world’s citizens. The majority of U.S. biotechnology firms are pursuing markets in human health care.

The research analyzes the US Biotechnology industry in the Michael Porter’s Five Forces Analysis. It uses concepts developed in Industrial Organization (IO) economics to derive five forces that determine the competitive intensity and therefore attractiveness of a market.

Apart from the Porter’s Five Forces analysis, the report also analyzes the biotechnology industry in the US in a brief profile.

Key Topics Covered:

A. Executive Summary

B. Introduction to the Industry

B.1 Industry Definition

B.2 What is Biotechnology?

B.3 Industry Structure

B.4 Industry Size

C. Porter’s Five Forces Strategy Analysis

C.1 Bargaining Power of Buyers

C.2 Bargaining Power of Suppliers

C.3 Competitive Rivalry in the Industry

C.4 Threat of New Entrants

C.5 Threat of Substitutes

D. Conclusion

E. Glossary of Terms

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pgkqzr/united_states

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United States Biotechnology Industry – Porter’s Five Forces Strategy … – Business Wire (press release)

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

Researchers investigate technique to accelerate learning – Medical Xpress

Posted: April 27, 2017 at 7:43 am

April 26, 2017

Researchers at the Texas Biomedical Device Center (TxBDC) at The University of Texas at Dallas have been awarded a contract worth up to $5.8 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to investigate a novel approach to accelerate the learning of foreign languages.

The contract is part of DARPA’s Targeted Neuroplasticity Training (TNT) program, which seeks to advance the pace and effectiveness of a specific kind of learningcognitive skills trainingthrough precise activation of peripheral nerves, which in turn can strengthen neural connections in the brain.

“Military personnel are required to utilize a wide variety of complex perceptual, motor and cognitive skills under challenging conditions,” said Dr. Robert Rennaker, Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering, director of the TxBDC and chairman of the Department of Bioengineering.

“Mastery of these difficult skills, including fluency in foreign language, typically requires thousands of hours of practice,” said Rennaker, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps.

DARPA’s TNT program aims to develop an optimized strategy to accelerate acquisition of complex skills, which would significantly reduce the time needed to train foreign language specialists, intelligence analysts, cryptographers and others.

Rennaker and his colleagues at the TxBDC will focus on developing an approach that uses vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) during training to specifically reinforce neural networks that are involved in learning a particular task.

VNS is an FDA-approved method for treating various illnesses, such as depression and epilepsy. It involves sending a mild electric pulse through the vagus nerve in the neck. When stimulated, the vagus nerve affects the brain, where it boosts the release of chemicals called neuromodulators. These chemicals facilitate synaptic plasticity, a process in which the connections between brain cells change and strengthen during learning.

“Imagine you’re struggling to learn something new, like multiplication tables or how to hit a golf ball. When you get it right, when that light bulb comes on, this system is being activated,” Rennaker said. “By stimulating the vagus nerve during the learning process, we’re artificially releasing these chemicals to enhance those connections active during learning.”

In the DARPA project, the aim is to accelerate learning of foreign languages by stimulating the vagus nerve during specific tasks.

“DARPA is approaching the study of synaptic plasticity from multiple angles to determine whether there are safe and responsible ways to enhance learning and accelerate training for skills relevant to national security missions,” said Doug Weber, TNT program manager at DARPA.

Over the past several years, researchers at the TxBDC have developed techniques to pair VNS with traditional rehabilitation to enhance recovery from an injury, an innovation they call Targeted Plasticity Therapy (TPT). In preliminary clinical studies, their technique has been shown to restore movements, reduce pain, increase feeling, improve memory and possibly speed up learning.

“This new project is focused on understanding if TPT can be used to accelerate learning in non-injured individuals,” Rennaker said. “If successful, this approach could benefit not only those that need to rapidly learn a new language but also those with learning impediments or conditions such as autism or brain injuries.”

Dr. Michael Kilgard, Margaret Fonde Jonsson Professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and associate director of the TxBDC, is the principal investigator.

“We believe that we will be able to substantially increase the rate of language learning. With VNS, we may be able to improve on the brain’s natural ability to learn,” Kilgard said. “We’re trying to march forward and make new technologies that aren’t currently available. I think it’s exciting.”

In addition to Rennaker and Kilgard, other co-principal investigators on the project are Dr. Seth Hayes, assistant professor in the Department of Bioengineering; Dr. Sven Vanneste, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences; and Dr. Diana Easton, clinical professor in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science. Also participating are Dr. Jane Wigginton from UT Southwestern Medical Center and Dr. Beverly Wright from Northwestern University.

Explore further: Researchers use vagus nerve stimulation outside the forebrain

A group of leading clinicians and experts dedicated to translational research in spinal cord injuries has recognized the work of a research fellow in the Texas Biomedical Device Center at UT Dallas.

A new study led by UT Dallas researchers shows that a gene associated with dyslexia may interfere with the processing of speech, ultimately leading to reading problems that are characteristic of the disorder.

A new study involving UT Dallas researchers shows that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) technology could help improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people who suffer weakness and paralysis caused by strokes.

UT Dallas researchers recently demonstrated how nerve stimulation paired with specific experiences, such as movements or sounds, can reorganize the brain. This technology could lead to new treatments for stroke, tinnitus, …

(Medical Xpress) — UT Dallas researchers recently demonstrated how nerve stimulation paired with specific experiences, such as movements or sounds, can reorganize the brain. This technology could lead to new treatments for …

(Medical Xpress)Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have taken a step toward developing a new treatment to aid the recovery of limb function after strokes.

Peering into laboratory glassware, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have watched stem-cell-derived nerve cells arising in a specific region of the human brain migrate into another brain region. This process …

In two independent studies, scientists at the University of Basel have demonstrated that both the structure of the brain and several memory functions are linked to immune system genes. The scientific journals Nature Communications …

Scientists write in Nature Communications it may be possible to therapeutically fine tune a constantly shifting balance of molecular signals to ensure the body’s peripheral nerves are properly insulated and functioning normally. …

An international collaboration of neuroscientists has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech.

Using human skin cells, University of California, Irvine neurobiologists and their colleagues have created a method to generate one of the principle cell types of the brain called microglia, which play a key role in preserving …

Have you ever thought someone was angry at you, but it turned out you were just misreading their facial expression? Caltech researchers have now discovered that one specific region of the brain, called the amygdala, is involved …

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Researchers investigate technique to accelerate learning – Medical Xpress

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko


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