Search Immortality Topics:

Page 8,611«..1020..8,6108,6118,6128,613..8,6208,630..»

Can You Tell Your Life Story In 6 Words?

Posted: May 5, 2010 at 8:24 am

Larry Smith and Rachel Fershleiser talk to NPR about the fun and the challenge of capturing real-life stories in six little words.

Some examples related to medicine:

Alzheimer's: meeting new people every day.
Phil Skversky

After cancer, I became a semicolon.
Anthony R. Cardno

Normal person becomes psychotic on Twitter.
Robin Slick

Yale at 16, downhill from there.
Anita Kawatra

References:
Can You Tell Your Life Story In Exactly Six Words? NPR, 2010.

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

WAD Magazine

Posted: May 5, 2010 at 8:23 am

WAD Magazine anatomy

WAD Magazine anatomy

WAD Magazine anatomy

Awesome use of materials by WAD Magazine to make these anatomical parts!  Love those lungs.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Kabinett des Grotesken ("Cabinet of the Grotesque"), Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charité, Spiegel Online

Posted: May 5, 2010 at 8:23 am


My friend, German journalist Michael Kneissler, just sent me a link to an article and an amazing short film celebrating the world famous Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charité on its 300th birthday, prompted by a new exhibition at the museum entitled "Charité--300 years of medicine in Berlin."

Following is an excerpt from the article--found on Spiegel Online and entitled "Kabinett des Grotesken" ("Cabinet of the Grotesque")--via a sloppy Google Translation:

Human malformations, surgical instruments, the Dildo-box of a sex researcher: The Collection of the Berlin Charité shows the dazzling variety of medical research. To mark its 300th anniversary Clinic presents highlights from the world famous now its archive.

Hands upset, steal: impossible. In the showcases the treasures of the Lord Virchow are safe. Very safe. And yet the guards sneak past every now and again. Ready to intervene immediately. They know that the temptation is to press for the issue "Charité - 300 Years of Medicine in Berlin" on the trigger...

Brains, livers, lungs, testes, ovaries removed - from the different and peaceful perished miserably, preserved in jars for viewing, Educate and quenching. An exhibition of the Interior, without taboos. Even human fetuses are also included. One with legs fused together, one with eyes grown together in the middle of the forehead. A Cyclops. Unreal and yet real.

Virchow himself called this collection - eagerly gathered for medical students and the public in order to warn of an unhealthy lifestyle - his "favorite child", for some visitors to the house if these preparations now the favorite image design: "Krass," it escapes some...

This dazzling looking exhibition is on view at the Berlin-based Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charité until February 2011; very much hope to see it before it comes down!

You can read the whole article and watch the wonderful video walk-through on the same page (just click the play button!) by clicking here. You can find out more about the museum in English by clicking here. Image above is drawn from the video.

Thanks so much to Michael Kneissler for sending this along!

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Silicon Valley Business of Engineering – A great event and resource for local medical device folks and others…

Posted: May 5, 2010 at 6:55 am

The Silicon Valley Business of Engineering is a great meet-up group put together by
Elise Engelhardt (LinkedIn profile here ) who, in my opinion is a great power networker and leader. Among many others, I attended the first meeting today and it was a great success!

The event was sponsored by two groups, Ozen Engineering (website here) and STM, aptly named Service To Mankind ( website here ). Instead of using their generous sponsorship as a platform to rave about themselves, both Metin Ozen of Ozen Engineering and Floyd Bertagnolli of STM kept their presentations very brief and informative (I learned something exciting, which I hope to share with you in a separate post).

The group's future events would be a great resource for engineers, not only medical device folks, but others as well. I ran into a host of service providers, consultants and so on. It was inspiring to meet some very entrepreneurial folks as well.

I networked with a bunch of folks, some of whom were kind enough to share in great detail how they charged for consulting, how they came up with the plans and so on. I also spent a good deal of time talking to another former Apple employee on the care they pay in engineering their products. The whole event was very educational for me. I hope to run into some of you at the next event!

I think this is a great beginning and a wonderful resource for engineers in the Silicon Valley, to carry on, as the title says, with the business of engineering.

Local Resources

1. Silicon Valley Business of Engineering

http://www.meetup.com/BusinessofEngineering/

2. Silicon Valley Engineering Council on LinkedIn

http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=46760&trk=myg_ugrp_ovr

3. MedDevice Engineers, Bay Area on LinkedIn

http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=2126&trk=myg_ugrp_ovr

4. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Santa Clara Valley on LinkedIn

http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=1300&trk=myg_ugrp_ovr

5. "sfmedengineers" on Yahoo! Groups

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sfmedengineers/

Do you know of other resources? If so, let me know and I will post them here.

Until next time...

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

The Limits of Therapy

Posted: May 4, 2010 at 8:16 am

From the SENS Foundation: "To date, the dominant therapeutic strategy for both specific age-related diseases and (to the extent that it has been contemplated) the degenerative biological aging process itself, has been based on altering metabolic pathways. Biomedical research has centered on the detailed understanding of pathways seen to be contributing to disease etiology or pathogenesis, and the identification of putatively dysfunctional components hormones, receptors, enzymes, cytokines, etc), which are then targeted for manipulation by small molecules or other means in hopes of normalizing function and thereby alleviating symptoms or slowing progression of pathology. ... there is a critical flaw in the unconsciously-drawn analogy between its use in the development of therapies to manage specific diseases, and its potential for the treatment of the degenerative aging process. Unlike most non-communicative diseases, degenerative aging is not the result of the dysfunction of metabolic pathways, but of the the undesirable long-term side-effects of their normative biochemistry. Put another way: biological aging is the pathological result of perfectly-functioning, [healthy] metabolic processes. ... Thus, transposing the conventional drug-development pathway onto the aging process necessarily entails interfering with the normal metabolism - and doing on an indefinite basis, from the day that a 'patient' first begins therapy until his or her death. But of course, those same pathways evolved to ensure survival and fitness, and their existence and the normal mode of regulation are the very basis of ordinary health and function. We interfere with the intrinsic operation of such pathways at our peril."

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.sens.org/node/747

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

Thoughts on Rejuvenation and Alzheimer’s Vaccines

Posted: May 4, 2010 at 8:16 am

A detailed examination of recent progress from the SENS Foundation: "Recent years have seen both substantial progress, and significant frustration, in the preferred regenerative engineering approach to the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the eventual regeneration of genuinely youthful cognitive function: immunotherapeutic clearance of beta-amyloid (AmyloSENS). ... results appear to many to commend an earlier window of opportunity for intervention, before concomitant [damage] and neuronal losses have made the removal of beta-amyloid alone insufficient for cognitive rescue. Early intervention might also maximize the therapeutic window for vaccination, preventing the burden of beta-amyloid neuropathology from ever reaching levels so high as to interact with other forms of aging damage in already frail and immunosenescent people." Present work on immune therapies for clearing unwanted biochemical junk from the body looks promising - there is every sign that today's advances will broaden into a general technology platform for this purpose. Researchers will be able to develop therapies that can be applied incrementally throughout life to remove the age-related gunk like beta-amyloid before it rises to dangerous levels.

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.sens.org/node/757

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko


Page 8,611«..1020..8,6108,6118,6128,613..8,6208,630..»