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Rock legend Ronnie James Dio is fighting stomach cancer

Posted: April 23, 2010 at 8:17 am

On 25 November 2009, Dio's wife and manager announced that he was diagnosed with stomach cancer:

"Ronnie has been diagnosed with the early stages of stomach cancer. We are starting treatment immediately at the Mayo Clinic. After he kills this dragon, Ronnie will be back on stage, where he belongs, doing what he loves best, performing for his fans. Long live rock and roll, long live Ronnie James Dio. Thanks to all the friends and fans from all over the world that have sent well wishes. This has really helped to keep his spirit up." -- "He has had a few hiccups between Christmas and New Year's," she said in a statement to fans. "He has had a blood clot, a trip to the emergency room, and a three-day stay at the hospital."

ArtisanNewsService — April 13, 2010 — "One of heavy metal's premiere vocalists Ronnie James Dio shares his thoughts on his battle with stomach cancer at the Revolver Golden Gods awards."

On 14 March 2010, Dio's wife and manager Wendy posted an online update on his condition:

"It has been Ronnie's 7th chemo, another cat scan and another endoscopy, and the results are good - the main tumour has shrunk considerably, and our visits to Houston (MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas) are now every three weeks instead of every two weeks."

References:
Ronnie James Dio. Wikipedia.
http://www.nme.com/news/black-sabbath/49346
Black Sabbath, Dio singer Ronnie James Dio gives cancer update. NME.com.

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow on Twitter, Buzz, and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Feminal Artery

Posted: April 23, 2010 at 8:17 am


Event posters for the ‘The Feminal Artery’, a female centered art show in Calgary that I co-planned.

Poster Credit goes to my friend Nicole Bruce!

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

"Museums, Monsters and the Moral Imagination" Lecture by Stephen Asma, Tonight!, Observatory

Posted: April 23, 2010 at 8:16 am


As discussed in this recent post, tonight professor Stephen Asma of Chicago's Columbia College will be at Observatory to deliver a much-anticipated lecture "Museums, Monsters and the Moral Imagination." This heavily-illustrated lecture will draw on the scholarship explored in two of his books--the very influential Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads and his new On Monsters--and will examine how science museums and monsters both illustrate the essential yet problematic human "urge to classify, set boundaries, and draw lines between the natural and the unnatural the human" and to "try to excavate some of the moral uses and abuses of this impulse."

Asma's written work--which has influenced my own projects immeasurably--is scholarly yet conversational, fun yet of the utmost earnestness; I am sure his lecture will strike the same balance, making this lecture truly not-to-be-missed. Both of Dr. Asma's books will be available for sale and signing at the event. Full details follow; hope very much to see you there!

Museums, Monsters and the Moral Imagination
An Illustrated lecture with Professor Stephen Asma, author of Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: the Culture and History of Natural History Museums and On Monsters.
Date: Tonight, Thursday, April 22
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: $5
Presented by Morbid Anatomy

In this illustrated lecture, professor Stephen Asma–author of the the definitive study of the natural history museum Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: the Culture and History of Natural History Museums–will draw upon his studies of science museums and monsters to reflect on their often hidden moral aspects. Museums are saying more about values than many people notice, and the same can be said about our cultural fascinations with monsters. The urge to classify, set boundaries, and draw lines between the natural and the unnatural are age-old impulses. In this lecture, Dr. Asma will try to excavate some of the moral uses and abuses of this impulse.

Stephen T. Asma is the author of Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: the Culture and History of Natural History Museums (Oxford) and more recently On Monsters: an Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears (Oxford). He is Professor of Philosophy at Columbia College Chicago and Fellow of the LAS Research Group in Mind, Science and Culture at Columbia. You can find out more about him at his website, http://www.stephenasma.com.

You can find out more about this presentation here. You can get directions to Observatory--which is next door to the Morbid Anatomy Library--by clicking here. You can find out more about Observatory here, join our mailing list by clicking here, and join us on Facebook by clicking here. To find out more about Asma's fantastic books, click here and here.

Image: From The Secret Museum; Pathological Cabinet, the Museum of the Faculty of Medicine at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow. © Joanna Ebenstein

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

500 repetitions of 4 cardiac murmurs improved auscultatory proficiency of medical students

Posted: April 23, 2010 at 1:40 am

According to a 2004 study in Chest, the ability of medical students to recognize heart murmurs is poor (20%), and does not improve with subsequent years of training.

Five hundred repetitions of four basic cardiac murmurs significantly improved auscultatory proficiency in recognizing basic cardiac murmurs by medical students. These results suggest that cardiac auscultation is, in part, a technical skill.

Related resources
The Heart Sounds Tutorial by Blaufuss.org is a fancy flash-based simulator with animations. The McGill University Virtual Stethoscope is another useful website. Click here for more web-based teaching resources for hearts sounds from UCLA and breath sounds from Loyola University.
References:
Mastering cardiac murmurs: the power of repetition. Barrett MJ, Lacey CS, Sekara AE, Linden EA, Gracely EJ. Chest. 2004 Aug;126(2):470-5.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15302733

Image source: Modern stethoscope. Wikipedia, public domain.

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow on Twitter, Buzz, and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Tissue Engineered Skin Progresses

Posted: April 22, 2010 at 8:16 am

Spanish scientists "have generated artificial human skin by [tissue] engineering based on agarose-fibrin biomaterial. The artificial skin was grafted onto mice, and optimal development, maturation and functionality results were obtained. This pioneering finding will allow the clinical use of human skin and its use in many laboratory tests on biological tissues - which, additionally, would avoid the use of laboratory animals. Further, this finding could be useful in developing new treatment approaches for dermatological pathologies. ... The skin created in the laboratory showed adequate biocompatibility rates with the recipient and no rejection, dehiscence or infection was registered. ... The experiment [is] the first to create artificial human skin with a dermis made of fibrin-agarose biomaterial. To this date, artificial skin substitutes were elaborated with other biomaterials as collagen, fibrin, polyglycolic acid, chitosan, etc. These biomaterials [added] resistance, firmness and elasticity to the skin. ... Definitively, we have created a more stable skin with similar functionality to normal human skin."

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/186185.php

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

An Update on Scent and Longevity

Posted: April 22, 2010 at 8:16 am

A number of studies in recent years have suggested that calorie intake is not the only thing that can alter metabolism to change longevity in lower animals: "Specific odors that represent food or indicate danger are capable of altering an animal's lifespan and physiological profile by activating a small number of highly specialized sensory neurons ... Recent research in model organisms and in humans has shown that sensory experiences can impact a wide range of health-related characteristics including athletic performance, type II diabetes, and aging. Nematode worms and fruit flies that were robbed of their ability to smell or taste, for example, lived substantially longer. However, the specific odors and sensory receptors that control this effect on aging were unknown. Using molecular genetics in combination with behavioral and environmental manipulations, [researchers have identified] carbon dioxide (CO2) as the first well-defined odorant capable of altering physiology and affecting aging. Flies incapable of smelling CO2 live longer than flies with normal olfactory capabilities. They are also resistant to stress and have increased body fat. To many insects, including fruit flies, CO2 represents an ecologically important odor cue that indicates the presence of food (e.g. rotting fruit or animal blood) or neighbors in distress (it has been implicated as a stress pheromone). Indeed, this group of researchers previously showed that merely sensing one's normal food source is capable of reversing the health and longevity benefits that are associated with a low calorie diet. They now establish that CO2 is responsible for this effect."

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-04/plos-tss041410.php

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko


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