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Hip Pockets

Posted: April 15, 2010 at 8:26 am

Raleigh Denim sceen printed hip bone pockets

Raleigh Denim sceen printed hip bone pockets

I have a huge appreciation for designers and artists who pay attention to the small details in their work. North Carolina based, Raleigh Denim is a small jean shop that makes all their jeans under one roof with local material and resources only.  They even use vintage machines. RD had a local print shop, Ahpeele, custom print these hip bone x-rays on the inside pockets of their Edmund style jeans.  It’s that small detail that makes these handmade jeans all the more unique.  More info on these jeans can be found here!

[submitted by Jason]

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

A Brief History of Automata, An Illustrated Lecture and Demonstration by Mike Zohn, Obscura Antiques and Oddities, TONIGHT! Coney Island Museum

Posted: April 15, 2010 at 8:25 am



Tonight is night three of the Congress for Curious People! To celebrate, come to the Coney Island Museum at 7:00 PM to see
Mike Zohn–of the inimitable Obscura Antiques and Oddities— as he demonstrates and explains the workings of his 19th Century bird-taxidermy automaton, which aficionados might remember from last Carnivorous Nights Taxidermy Contest; (see bottom image to jog your memory).

To accompany the demonstration, Mike will give an illustrated lecture about the fascinating, surprising, and sometimes nefarious history of automata. And–added bonus–there will also be half-price drinks at the bar till 7! Full details follow; hope to see you there!

A Brief History of Automata
An Illustrated Lecture and Demonstration by Mike Zohn,
Obscura Antiques and Oddities
Date: Wednesday, April 14th (Tonight!)
Time: 7:00 PM
LOCATION:
The Coney Island Museum
In this illustrated lecture, Obscura Antique and Oddities‘ Mike Zohn will demonstrate his 19th Century taxidermy automata, as featured in last year’s Carnivorous Nights Taxidermy Contest. He will explain its curious mechanisms, and, in an illustrated lecture, will introduce us to the history of these fascinating uncanny machines, tracing their trajectory from tools of religious coercion to prince’s plaything to Disney’s imagineering experiments.

Mike Zohn is co-proprietor of Obscura Antique and Oddities. He fixes automata in his spare time.

For information about the Coney Island Museum–including address and directions–click here. For more about the Congress for Curious People–under whose auspices this event is included–click here. To find out more about the larger Congress of Curious Peoples click here. Click here to download a hi-res copy of the broadside invitation.

Bottom image: Mike Zohn with his Bird Automaton at the Carnivorous Nights Taxidermy Contest; from the Flickr page of tenebrouskate; click here to see more.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Weak Kidneys Cause Weak Bones

Posted: April 15, 2010 at 8:25 am

by Jean-Claude Alix, Naturopath

No single area of the body stands alone, everything is linked up. This is why medical specialisation is one of the greatest mistakes that was ever

made.

Viewed from this angle, hardly any two areas are so closely and deeply intertwined as the renal metabolism and the bone metabolism. Thus, it is understandable that weakness in the kidneys must necessarily result in weakness in the bones. The discussion of these interrelations is the

theme of this treatise.

Significance of the kidney as the centre of bone formation:

– The kidney as regulator of the

electrolytes

– The kidney as regulator of the

acid-alkaline balance

– The kidney as the base of anxiety Read more…

Joint Mender for Joint Care

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Damage in Early Life Shortens Life Expectancy

Posted: April 15, 2010 at 8:24 am

As illustrated by the reliability theory of aging, we are complex machines, and our life expectancy is a function of the pace at which we accumulate damage. For example, one contribution to rising life spans over the past century was the elimination of much of the burden of chronic disease throughout early life and middle age. Here, however, is an example of another, less common form of damage that nonetheless has the expected end result: “Although more children today are surviving cancer than ever before, young patients successfully treated in the 1970s and 80s may live a decade less, on average, than the general population … The study, based on a computer model, is the first to estimate the lifetime toll of childhood cancer and the grueling but increasingly successful treatments for diseases such as kidney and bone cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors. About 10,000 children and adolescents are diagnosed with cancer annually, and the five-year survival rate has risen to about 80 percent overall. … The study is based on how children were treated in the 1970s and early 1980s. It is our hope that when we see data from more recent cohorts of patients, there will be improved life expectancy as a result of some changes that pediatric oncologists have made.”

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-04/dci-ccs040510.php

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

WILT, ALT, and Zscan4

Posted: April 15, 2010 at 8:24 am

From the SENS Foundation: “To develop an unbreachable defense against cancer, SENS Foundation is pursuing the WILT (Wholebody Interdiction of Lengthening of Telomeres) strategy (OncoSENS) of systematically deleting genes essential to the cellular telomere-maintenance mechanisms (TMM) from all somatic cells, while ensuring ongoing tissue repair and maintenance through periodic re-seeding of somatic stem-cell pools with autologous TMM-deficient cells whose telomeres have been lengthened ex vivo. In addition to the deletion of one or more genes coding for essential element(s) of the telomerase holoenzyme, success will also require the deletion of some essential element of the machinery for the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) phenomenon, observed in a minority of cancer cells. Heretofore, the identity of that machinery has been elusive. Yeast cells have the ability to lengthen telomeres through a telomerase-independent mechanism involving telomere recombination, and there has been evidence for some time suggesting that ALT cancers lengthen telomeres through a similar process.” The article goes on to look in detail at one plausible candidate mechanism for ALT, and how this new knowledge might be incorporated into WILT.

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.sens.org/node/739

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Damage in Early Life Shortens Life Expectancy

Posted: April 14, 2010 at 8:22 am

As illustrated by the reliability theory of aging, we are complex machines, and our life expectancy is a function of the pace at which we accumulate damage. For example, one contribution to rising life spans over the past century was the elimination of much of the burden of chronic disease throughout early life and middle age. Here, however, is an example of another, less common form of damage that nonetheless has the expected end result: “Although more children today are surviving cancer than ever before, young patients successfully treated in the 1970s and 80s may live a decade less, on average, than the general population … The study, based on a computer model, is the first to estimate the lifetime toll of childhood cancer and the grueling but increasingly successful treatments for diseases such as kidney and bone cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors. About 10,000 children and adolescents are diagnosed with cancer annually, and the five-year survival rate has risen to about 80 percent overall. … The study is based on how children were treated in the 1970s and early 1980s. It is our hope that when we see data from more recent cohorts of patients, there will be improved life expectancy as a result of some changes that pediatric oncologists have made.”

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-04/dci-ccs040510.php

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko


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