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High-risk profession: Suicide rate of U.S. doctors is one per day

Posted: May 8, 2010 at 8:14 am

More than a quarter of primary care doctors reported being “burnt out,” in part due to worsening time pressures and a chaotic work pace, which were “strongly associated with low physician satisfaction.”

300-400 doctors in the United States kill themselves every year, or roughly 1 per day. Male doctors have suicide rates 1.4 times that of the general population, while female doctors have twice the rate of depression and 2.3 times the suicide rate when compared with women who are not physicians.

References:

Help for Today’s Tense, Frustrated Doctors. Medscape, 2009.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/710904
Image source: Vincent van Gogh’s 1890 painting At Eternity’s Gate. Wikipedia, public domain.

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

How to Subscribe to "What’s New" Specialty Page of UpToDate? No Feed, No Problem for Google Reader

Posted: May 8, 2010 at 8:14 am

35% of UpToDate topics are updated every four months. The editors select a small number of the most important updates and share them via “What’s new” page. These selections are changed with each major release of UpToDate, in March, July and November. See these updates by clicking on the specialty you are interested in.

The page does not provide RSS feed for the different specialties. One solution is to copy/paste the URL address of each subspecialty page you are interested in the Google Reader “Add a subscription” field (top left corner). Google Reader will automatically create a RSS feed from this “feedless” page.

References:
UTD Contents: What’s New

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Anatomic Fashion Friday: Skeleton Sweatshirt

Posted: May 8, 2010 at 8:14 am

Wildfox Couture’s oversized skeleton sweatshirt can be yours for $108!  I like the irony of baggy bones!

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Tonight!!! "The Saddest Object in the World," An Illustrated Meditation, Observatory

Posted: May 8, 2010 at 8:14 am


Tonight! Evan Michelson on “The Saddest Object in the World,” as experienced at this years Congress for Curious People.

Full details follow; hope to see you there!

The Saddest Object in the World
An Illustrated Meditation by Evan Michelson, Obscura Antiques and Oddities, Morbid Anatomy Library Scholar in residence
Date: TONIGHT! Friday, May 7th
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: $5
Location: Observatory

“The Saddest Object in the World” is a meditation on one particular artifact; an exercise in Proustian involuntary memory, aesthetic critique, and philosophical bargaining.

Sometimes objects have consequences.

Evan Michelson is an antiques dealer, lecturer, accumulator and aesthete; she tirelessly indulges a lifelong pursuit of all things obscure and melancholy. She currently lives in another place and time.

You can find out more about this presentation here. You can get directions to Observatory–which is next door to the Morbid Anatomy Library (more on that here)–by clicking here. You can find out more about Observatory here, join our mailing list by clicking here, and join us on Facebook by clicking here.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

A high-throughput transient gene expression system for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) seedlings

Posted: May 8, 2010 at 8:14 am

Background:
Grasses are relatively recalcitrant to genetic transformation in comparison to certain dicotyledons, yet they constitute some of the most important biofuel crops. Genetic transformation of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) has previously been reported after cocultivation of explants with Agrobacterium and biolistics of embryogenic calli. Experiments to increase transient gene expression in planta may lead to stable transformation methods with increased efficiency.
Results:
A high-throughput Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression system has been developed for in planta inoculation of germinating switchgrass seedlings. Four different Agrobacterium strains were compared for their ability to infect switchgrass seedlings, and strain AGL1 was found to be the most infective. Wounding pretreatments such as sonication, mixing by vortex with carborundum, separation by centrifugation, vacuum infiltration, and high temperature shock significantly increased transient expression of a reporter gene (GUSPlus, a variation of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene). The addition of L-cysteine and dithiothreitol in the presence of acetosyringone significantly increased GUS expression compared with control treatments, whereas the addition of 0.1% surfactants such as Silwet L77 or Li700 decreased GUS expression. 4-Methylumbelliferyl beta-D-galactopyranoside (MUG) assays showed a peak of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) enzyme activity 3 days after cocultivation with Agrobacterium harboring pCambia1305.2, whereas MUG assays showed a peak of enzyme activity 5 days after cocultivation with Agrobacterium harboring pCambia1305.1.
Conclusion:
Agrobacterium strains C58, GV3101 and EHA105 are less able to deliver transfer DNA to switchgrass seedlings (cultivar Alamo) compared with strain AGL1. Transient expression was increased by double or triple wounding treatments such as mixing by vortex with carborundum, sonication, separation by centrifugation, and heat shock. The addition of thiol compounds such as L-cysteine and dithiothreitol in combination with acetosyringone during cocultivation also increased transient expression. The combination of multiple wounding treatments along with the addition of thiol compounds during cocultivation increased transient expression levels from 6% to 54%. There were differences in temporal GUS expression induced by pCambia1305.1 and pCambia1305.2.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Prostate cancer therapy can increase risk of heart disease and death

Posted: May 8, 2010 at 8:13 am

A new report published in the American Cancer Society journal, CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, and in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation, reveals that androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), a type of prostate cancer treatment (http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/cc/prostatecancer.htm), can increase heart risk factors and possibly lead to heart attack (http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/hh/heartattack.htm) or cardiac death.

A writing group of experts from the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, the American Urological Association, and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology published their findings that indicate that ADT leads to increased fat mass, increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the “bad” form of cholesterol, and blood sugar abnormalities. Read more…

Ayurstate for Prostate Care

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


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