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More about presentations at AACR10

Posted: May 2, 2010 at 8:16 am

Five presentations at the 101th annual meeting of the American Association of Cancer Research were highlighted a news release from Geron Corporation (dated March 3, 2010). One presentation that had an explicit focus on CSC was this poster:

Imetelstat, a telomerase inhibitor in phase I trials in solid tumor and hematological malignancies, has broad activity against multiple types of cancer stem cells [Presentation Abstract].

Also mentioned in the news release was an oral presentation by Jerry W Shay, given as part of the Major Symposium entitled: Role of Telomeres and Telomerase in Chromosomal Stability and Disease [Session Detail]. The presentation was:

Role of telomerase in normal and neoplastic stem cells [Presentation Abstract].

Another poster about the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat (GRN163L) was:

Sensitivity and resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat [Presentation Abstract].

Comments: A search of the ClinicalTrials.gov database for GRN163L revealed 6 trials. Four were ongoing, but not recruiting participants. Two were still recruiting: 1) Safety and Dose Study of GRN163L Administered to Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Solid Tumor Malignancies; 2) A Study of GRN163L With Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab to Treat Patients With Locally Recurrent Or Metastatic Breast Cancer.

An analogous search for imetelstat yielded the same 6 trials. All 6 trials have been sponsored by Geron Corporation.

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

Some nurses paid more than family doctors – CNN

Posted: May 2, 2010 at 8:16 am

Primary care doctors were offered an average base salary of $173,000 in 2009 compared to an average base salary of $189,000 offered to certified nurse anesthetists, or CRNAs.

It’s the fourth year in a row that CRNAs were recruited at a higher pay than a family doctor.

Comments from Google Buzz:

Jeffrey Benabio, MD – And soon doctor of nursing programs will graduate nurses who call themselves “doctor” in clinic. Physicians have been asleep at the wheel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctorate_in_Nursing

Francesco Diana – without words

Anne Marie Cunningham – Both of these are very high salaries. As @scanman points out, they are unobtainable for most people working in health in India and countries. Can we tolerate such global inequality?

How should salaries in any part of the world be determined? Are both these groups paid too much?

At the moment there is a great deal of uncertainty on how the role of a doctor differs to the role of a nurse. Professor Alan Maynard suggests that professions are bad for healthcare. http://www.healthpolicyinsight.com/?q=node/458 What do you think?

Image source: OpenClipArt.org, public domain.

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Turning medical residents away from copy-and-paste culture facilitated by EMR

Posted: May 2, 2010 at 8:16 am

Cleveland VA is trying to cut out the burgeoning subculture of “copy-and-paste”: A phenomenon made possible by electronic medical records in which physicians copy old information about a patient and paste it into a new section of the chart.

The practice is seen by medical residents as a time-saver but the attendings consider it an “egregious problem” because the practice has the potential to perpetuate mistakes. For example, someone might copy and paste information from a patient’s medical history without verifying that the information is correct. Any errors that might exist will be repeated.

EMR can’t just disable the copy-and-paste function, since such a move would impact other programs.

References:

Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.


Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Thoughts on Transhumanism From Humanity+ UK

Posted: May 2, 2010 at 8:15 am

An attendee at the Humanity+ UK 2010 conference offers thoughts on transhumanist goals: “The convergence of current technologies such as nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science (NBIC) and future technologies such as artificial intelligence, mind uploading, cryonics, and simulated reality, is truly inspirational. … I think we all have a vested interest in Aubrey de Grey’s idea that aging is simply a disease, and a curable one at that. His plan is to identify all the components that cause human tissue to age, and design remedies for each of them through his approach called SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence). Once we can extend human life spans by thirty years, we’re well on our way to immortality. Aubrey de Grey claims that the first human being to live a thousand years has probably already been born. From the way he talks, the biggest challenge in the race against mortality is funding! So I highly encourage those of you with means and an interest to donate to the SENS Foundation. … Another fascinating speaker was David Pearce, advocating the abolition of suffering throughout the living world. … He argues that as we develop these technologies, it is both our moral and hedonistic imperative to rid all sentient beings of pain.”

View the Article Under Discussion: http://beforeitsnews.com/news/38084/Transhumanism_and_the_Future_of_the_Human_Race.html

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Looking to the Future of Personalized Medicine

Posted: May 2, 2010 at 8:15 am

Sequencing our own DNA and cross-referencing the results against the best of present scientific knowledge will soon be cheap and routine. This is an example of the sort of incremental progress in medical technology that is increasing human life expectancy year after year: a little more prevention here, a little better insight into how to cure there. From ScienceDaily: “For the first time, researchers have used a healthy person’s complete genome sequence to predict his risk for dozens of diseases and how he will respond to several common medications. The risk analysis [also] incorporates more-traditional information such as a patient’s age and gender and other clinical measurements. The resulting, easy-to-use, cumulative risk report will likely catapult the use of such data out of the lab and into the waiting room of average physicians within the next decade, say the scientists. … The $1,000 genome is coming fast. The challenge lies in knowing what to do with all that information. We’ve focused on establishing priorities that will be most helpful when a patient and a physician are sitting together looking at the computer screen. … Information like this will enable doctors to deliver personalized health care like never before. Patients at risk for certain diseases will be able to receive closer monitoring and more frequent testing, while those who are at lower risk will be spared unnecessary tests. This will have important economic benefits as well, because it improves the efficiency of medicine.”

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100429204658.htm

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Kim Joon

Posted: May 1, 2010 at 11:03 pm

Kim Joon

Kim Joon

Kim Joon

Kim Joon

Kim Joon brings to life his surface patterns and textures by using the human body as his canvas.  The patterns he creates using repetitive color, skin tones, and body parts creates a finished work reminiscent of a wall paper or tapestry.  I love how he utilizes the skin to peek through his patterns.  So much more can be seen here!

[via BeautifulDecay]

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


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