Search Immortality Topics:

Page 8,511«..1020..8,5108,5118,5128,513..8,5208,530..»

Prostate cancer therapy can increase risk of heart disease and death

Posted: May 8, 2010 at 8:13 am

A new report published in the American Cancer Society journal, CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, and in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation, reveals that androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), a type of prostate cancer treatment (http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/cc/prostatecancer.htm), can increase heart risk factors and possibly lead to heart attack (http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/hh/heartattack.htm) or cardiac death.

A writing group of experts from the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, the American Urological Association, and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology published their findings that indicate that ADT leads to increased fat mass, increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the “bad” form of cholesterol, and blood sugar abnormalities. Read more…

Ayurstate for Prostate Care

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

The Scientist Article on Electronic Lab Notebooks

Posted: May 7, 2010 at 9:17 pm

Amber Dance has written an article in The Scientist (2010-05-01) Digital Upgrade: How to choose your lab’s next electronic lab notebook. This is basically a quick overview of different Electronic Lab Notebooks (ELNs) that should be helpful for people researching what is currently available in that space.

There was some coverage of Open Notebook Science and Steve Koch and I were quoted. Ironically my contribution appeared in the “Cons” section 🙂

Pros

  • The format is unconstrained—you can set up any categories, and as many users and pages, as you want—and fast to set up.
  • Open notebooking attracts collaborators. Koch counts three collaborations that wouldn’t have happened if he weren’t on OpenWetWare. And his students build professional networks well before they author a paper.

Cons

  • Wikis were not designed with scientific data in mind. For example, it’s hard to make a table, Koch says.
  • Open notebook science “does limit where you can send your work,” says Jean-Claude Bradley, a chemist at Drexel University in Philadelphia, who also uses an open wiki notebook. His lab sticks to journals that accept preprints.
  • Posting online voids international patent rights, although US patents are still possible.

In my opinion, one of the biggest “Pros” wasn’t listed in that section: the free cost. (That was mentioned elsewhere though) When you see the costs of some of these other commercial systems, that has to be a factor for many people trying to make a decision.

If privacy is an issue wikis can certainly be made private, although I’m not sure if that is possible on OpenWetWare. It can be done for $5/month on Wikispaces, the wiki we use for lab notebooks – although then it wouldn’t be Open Notebook Science.

Concerning Steve’s Con of wikis being difficult to use to store data, that is true. However combining the use of a wiki with Google Spreadsheets has completely resolved that issue for us. With our ability to automatically export an archive of the notebook (as HTML) and spreadsheets (as XLS) into an integrated archive, the two platforms operate essentially as if they were a single system.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Vaccinating Against Atherosclerosis

Posted: May 7, 2010 at 8:17 am

An interesting example of how immune therapies can eliminate or reduce some of the ways in which the aging body damages itself: “Cholesterol is transported in the blood in LDL particles, which are a kind of fat drops that can accumulate in the walls of blood vessels. LDL activates the immune defence and triggers an inflammation in the blood vessels that leads to atherosclerosis (also known as arteriosclerosis). When the atherosclerotic plaque finally ruptures, a blood clot is formed that in turn can cause a heart attack or stroke. It was previously thought that the inflammation in the blood vessels arises when the T cells react to oxidised LDL particles located in the atherosclerotic plaque. Now, however, [researchers have found] that the opposite is true, namely that the T cells react to components in the normal LDL particles, and that they no longer recognise LDL once it has been oxidised. … Since reactions to LDL can be dangerous, T cells are normally held in check by inhibitory signals. The body’s own control works well as long as the LDL keeps to the blood, liver and lymph glands. But when it accumulates in the artery wall, this inhibition is no longer enough, the T cells are activated and an inflammation arises. … Vaccination against the receptor that the T cells use to recognise LDL can block the immune reaction and reduce the disease by between 60 and 70 per cent.”

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-05/ki-nav050610.php

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

A Trial for Viruses Versus Brain Cancer

Posted: May 7, 2010 at 8:17 am

Viruses can be used as a form of targeted anti-cancer therapy, and human trials are soon set to start: “Particular parvoviruses normally infect rodents, but they are also infectious for human cells. However, they do not cause any disease symptoms in humans. Most importantly, these viruses have an astonishing property: They kill infected tumors cells without causing any damage to healthy tissue. … Many different viruses have been tested before in cancer therapy, particularly for treating those types of cancer for which there are no effective established treatment methods. The [researchers] realized early on that parvovirus H-1 has important advantages over other viruses. Now they have been the first to prove that malignant glioblastomas regress completely as a result of treatment with these viruses. … Parvoviruses pass the blood brain barrier so that they can be administered via the blood stream. In addition, they reproduce in cancer cells, which is particularly important for successful treatment of glioblastoma with its diffuse growth. Thus, the second generation viruses reach and eliminate even those cancer cells that have already settled at some distance from the primary tumor. … researchers [expect] to be able to admit the first patients to the trial by the end of the year.”

View the Article Under Discussion: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100504095106.htm

Read More Longevity Meme Commentary: http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

You Are Here Poster

Posted: May 7, 2010 at 8:16 am

Show your love to someone by giving them this hand-printed letterpress poster by Etsy artist rollandtumblepress. $25.00!  So sweeeeet.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Original Fritz Kahn Posters and Key Booklet, Sotheby’s Vintage Posters Auction, May 13

Posted: May 7, 2010 at 8:16 am



Morbid Anatomy reader Gotthold is a long time collector of Fritz Kahn books and posters. He is currently selling two of his original posters (as pictured above) along with a “key booklet” as part of Sotheby’s May 13 Vintage Posters Auction.

I asked Gotthold to tell me and the Morbid Anatomy readership a bit about this special collection he is actioning off in the hopes of helping it find a proper and loving home; here is his response:

Dear Morbid Anatomy readers:

I have been a keen reader of this blog since I discovered it about a year ago when searching for information on anatomical posters I bought for use in an art project.

My personal artistic fascination with death, pornography, science and religion has taken me on a strange and fascinating journey over the past year through the cavernous bookshop cellars of Vienna, the seedy sex shops of London’s Soho, and the wonderful Morbid Anatomy blog in search of new materials and ideas. In my search for materials to use for my work, I spend a seemingly senseless amount of time and money looking for rare, obscure, and interesting materials to use and take inspiration from. It was on one of these escapades when visiting Vienna that I first stumbled upon the wonderful works of Fritz Kahn whose unique mechanical anatomy illustrations have earned much attention on this very blog (recent posts here, here, and here).

Since this initial discovery, I have managed to amass an extensive collection of Fritz Kahn’s books, all featuring his wonderful illustrations, and have also had the luck to acquire a few original posters, including the famed ‘Der Mensch als Industriepalast’ or ‘Man as Industrial Palace’ of 1926 as seen above, top; you can found out more about that piece here.

Conducting more commercially oriented research around these works, I stumbled upon Morbid Anatomy for the first time to read a post on a Christies ‘Anatomy as Art’ auction in New York where this poster sold for some $3,500. The financially conscious side of myself forced me to reluctantly get in touch with Christies in London regarding a sale. I was informed by their experts there was no specialist auction coming up anytime soon but that I could still consign the poster to a ‘Vintage Posters’ auction in May. I chose to sell the two posters and a ‘key’ booklet together as a lot; I still believe this is extremely unique, given that the key booklet acts as an index to the numerical and alphabetical indicators on the poster without which it is difficult to fully comprehend the intended meaning of the illustrations.

The marketing around this auction has been weak, and there isn’t much explanation of the uniqueness of the key booklet or even an image of the second poster in the lot (as seen above, bottom). When I looked at the other posters for sale at this the auction I realized that my item is out of place and I doubt that it will strike the right chord with the bidders.

I have still however decided to proceed with the auction, not in the least because I need the proceeds of this sale to help further my artistic pursuits. I therefore implore anyone who knows relevant collectors to spread the word about the auction, and encourage anyone who’s interested to bid on these items as they are impeccable (the nice thing about Christies auctions is that anyone can place bids from anywhere in the world online). You can see the lot on the auction website by clicking here.

So please, any and all of you medical art aficionados out there, check out (and bid on!) Gotthold’s Sotheby’s lot on May 13th; you can find out more about the lot by clicking here and more about the auction by clicking here. And yes, online/remote bidding is very much a possibility! Also, please feel free to forward this post to any interested parties!

If you are interested in learning more about Fritz Kahn and seeing more of his incredible work, I highly recommend the beautiful, lavishly illustrated book Fritz Kahn: Man Machine / Maschine Mensch, which comes complete with a frame-worthy poster-sized reproduction of ‘Der Mensch als Industriepalast’ (‘Man as Industrial Palace’). Good stuff!

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


Page 8,511«..1020..8,5108,5118,5128,513..8,5208,530..»