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Online Biotechnology Bachelor’s Degree | UMUC

Posted: January 8, 2019 at 5:45 am

In addition to the general education requirements and the major, minor, and elective requirements, the overall requirements listed below apply to all bachelor's degrees.

Double majors: You can earn a dual major upon completion of all requirements for both majors, including the required minimum number of credits for each major and all related requirements for both majors. The same class cannot be used to fulfill requirements for more than one major. Certain restrictions (including use of credit and acceptable combinations of majors) apply for double majors. You cannot major in two programs with excessive overlap of required coursework. Contact an admissions advisor before selecting a double major.

Second bachelor's degree: To earn a second bachelor's degree, you must complete at least 30 credits through UMUC after completing the first degree. The combined credit in both degrees must add up to at least 150 credits. You must complete all requirements for the major. All prerequisites apply. If any of these requirements were satisfied in the previous degree, the remainder necessary to complete the minimum 30 credits of new classes should be satisfied with classes related to your major. You may not earn a second bachelor's degree in general studies and may not obtain a second associate's degree within the second bachelor's degree. Contact an admissions advisor before pursuing a second bachelor's degree.

Electives: Electives can be taken in any academic discipline. No more than 21 credits can consist of vocational or technical credit. Pass/fail credit, up to a maximum of 18 credits, can be applied toward electives only.

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Online Biotechnology Bachelor's Degree | UMUC

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Sana Biotechnology Launches Focusing on Engineering Cells to …

Posted: January 8, 2019 at 5:45 am

SEATTLE, Jan. 4, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Sana Biotechnology, Inc. (Sana), a new company focused on creating and delivering engineered cells as medicines for patients, announced its launch today. Recent scientific advances make it possible to reprogram cells in the body or replace damaged cells and tissues, creating a new class of medicines to treat a broad array of diseases.

Sana is bringing together research, development, and manufacturing capabilities across cell therapy, gene therapy, and gene editing as well as a team of executives, board members, investors, and scientists with deep experience in these areas.

"Cell and gene engineering provide the opportunity to address the underlying cause of disease and provide benefits to patients that have previously been not possible," said Steve Harr, Sana Co-Founder and CEO. "There are challenges in making and delivering these kinds of medicines to patients, but also the opportunity to treat illnesses that today have few, if any, options. Our goal with Sana is to bring together the people, technologies, and resources needed to address these challenges, changing both how we approach treating disease and what we expect as outcomes for patients."

The company is building critical core capabilities around

"I am thrilled to join the leadership team and board as we launch Sana," said Hans Bishop, Co-Founder and Executive Chair of Sana. "We have assembled a scientific team and a portfolio of potential medicines and technologies from proven scientific innovators, including Flagship Pioneering, Harvard University, the University of California San Francisco, and the University of Washington School of Medicine. I look forward to working again with ARCH Venture Partners, focusing on advancing the technologies in the company today as well as bringing in additional technologies and capabilities to make our vision around engineered cells a reality."

"Flagship Pioneering originates companies that apply new biological breakthroughs to tackle the most intractable challenges in health, and we believe Sana is one of those companies," said Noubar Afeyan, Sana Co-Founder and Founder and CEO of Flagship Pioneering. "We are thrilled about the opportunity to combine the novel, cell-specific in vivo gene delivery platforms pioneered during several years of R&D within Flagship Labs with the other technologies and potential medicines to form Sana. We look forward to collaborating with our co-founders and partners to develop this best-in-class company."

"ARCH partners with experienced, world-class management teams to assemble the technology, talent, and capital to create companies that solve big problems for patients," said Robert Nelsen, Sana Co-Founder and Managing Director and Co-Founder of ARCH Venture Partners. "We believe the time is right to commit the resources needed to create a new pillar of medicine that not only treats disease, but hopefully cures it. Sana is a unique company in a transformative time in science, and we believe this team, combined with its co-founders, has the experience, creativity and know-how to make a big impact on medicine."

Founding Executive Team

Founding Board of Directors

Founding Scientists

Investors

About SanaSana Biotechnology, Inc. is focused on creating and delivering engineered cells as medicine for patients. We are a team of scientists, clinicians and biotechnology veterans focused on creating an enduring company that makes meaningful medicines and changes how we approach treating disease. Sana has operations in Seattle, WA, Cambridge, MA and South San Francisco, CA.

Contact:Edward [email protected]

SOURCE Sana Biotechnology, Inc.

http://www.sana.com

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Sana Biotechnology Launches Focusing on Engineering Cells to ...

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Biotechnology Program | Texas Tech University Health Sciences …

Posted: January 8, 2019 at 5:45 am

If you're interested in biotechnology as applied to the field of human medicine, our Biotechnology Programmay be just what you're looking for. The M.S. in Biotechnology is a 21 month curriculum that includes two semesters of coursework and a year of full time research in a Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center lab or an internship with an industry lab.

There is no shortcut to a quality education; our faculty are active investigators conducting internationally recognized research in their respective fields. Consequently, graduates of our program move on to the next phases in their careers with the confidence that can only come from the experience of working full time in a state-of-the-art biomedical research laboratory.

GSBS 5000 Interprofessional ExperienceGSBS 5471 Core I: MoleculesGSBS 5372 Core II: CellsGSBS 5373 Core III: GenesGSBS 5174 Core IV: Biomedical SeminarGBTC 5020 Laboratory Methods

Total Credit Hours: 12

GBTC 6101 Biotechnology SeminarGBTC 6301 Introduction to BiotechnologyGBTC 6202 Biomedical InformaticsGBTC 5337 Techniques in BiotechnologyGSBS 5101 Responsible Conduct of Research*Elective* Mandatory 3 hour elective

Total Credit Hours: 13

Starting in the summer session, students have the option of working in a TTUHSC lab or securing an internship position with a biotechnology-based company. The two coursework options are below:

GBTC 7000 Research

Total Credit Hours: 6

GBTC 7000 ResearchGBTC 5199 Biotechnology Lab ReportElective

Total Credit Hours: 10-13

GBTC 7000 ResearchGBTC 5299 Biotechnology Final ReportElective

Total Credit Hours: 11-14

GBTC 6001 Biotechnology Internship

Total Credit Hours: 6

GBTC 6001 Biotechnology InternshipGBTC 5298 Biotechnology Internship Report

Total Credit Hours: 11

GBTC 6001 Biotechnology InternshipGBTC 5299 Biotechnology Final ReportElective

Total Credit Hours: 11-14

GBTC 5210 The MicrobiomeGBTC 5340 The Biology of Cancer

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Biotechnology Program | Texas Tech University Health Sciences ...

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

The Disadvantages of Biotechnology | Sciencing

Posted: January 8, 2019 at 5:45 am

Maksymowicz/iStock/Getty Images

Biotechnology is the controlled manipulation of biological systems, including living cells or cellular components, for the processing or manufacturing of various products useful to humans. Biologists apply not only biological methods but also physics, chemistry, mathematics and engineering in order to learn about organisms and to develop techniques for the manipulation of biological systems. While biotechnology provides an expansive advantage for humans and the environment, there are also a number of potential disadvantages to consider.

Biotechnology is the controlled manipulation of biological systems, including living cells or cellular components, for the processing or manufacturing of various products useful to humans. The advent of biotechnology has benefited fields such as agriculture, animal husbandry, the pharmaceutical industry and medical sciences. In agriculture, it is possible that genetically modified crops might not have long-term viability. Genetically modified plants or microorganisms could spread their genetic information into the ecosystem, causing harm such as reduced biodiversity.

Biotechnologys positive impact on the world is well-known. The advent of biotechnology has benefited fields such as agriculture, animal husbandry, the pharmaceutical industry and medical sciences. In agricultural biotechnology, genetic engineering has enabled the production of crops that are able to grow in non-ideal soil or in dry conditions. These genetically modified, or transgenic, crops are of higher quality and higher yield, and have increased shelf life. In addition, they have been engineered to be resistant to pests, which allows farms to use less pesticide. Biotechnology has also enabled the mass production of previously unavailable medicines, such as insulin, and facilitated research into molecular biology using genetically modified organisms.

Biotechnology has indeed done a lot of good for the world, but it also has disadvantages, and there are some concerns about its potential negative impacts. In agriculture, there are concerns that genetically modified crops may transfer genetic material into natural, unmodified plants. For instance, a crop that is herbicide resistant may transfer some of its traits to a weed, which would result in an herbicide resistant weed. Another concern about agricultural biotechnology centers around the uncertainty of genetically modified crops long-term biological viability.

Because of the fast growth, pest resistance and hardiness of transgenic crops, the yield of such crops is typically higher than those of conventional crops. Yet some economists are concerned that overproduction due to transgenic crops may result in effects such as market instability, reduced export income, fewer product varieties and even unemployment. Depressed economies may also be unable to take advantage of the potential benefits of agricultural biotechnology due to global overproduction. The asymmetrical availability of these crops also raises questions about the potential for discriminatory exploitation.

The long-term consequences of the genetic alteration of various organisms - from bacteria in the pharmaceutical industry to the animals in biological research to the plants in agriculture - are still unknown. Genetically modified organisms may also escape into the wild, especially transgenic microorganisms, and these events may upset the balance of the ecosystem in nature. This may cause a decrease in the biodiversity, also known as the variety, of organisms.

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The Disadvantages of Biotechnology | Sciencing

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Neurosurgery Residency Research | Lewis Katz School of …

Posted: January 7, 2019 at 5:49 am

Resident Research Requirements

Residents are expected to be academically productive appropriate to their level of training within the program. Junior residents are expected to work on case reports, book chapters, and/or assist senior residents with ongoing projects. Senior residents are expected to produce academic publications based on their laboratory and clinical experience prior to graduation from the program. Notably, residents have recieved the Synthes Award for Resident Research on Spinal Cord and Spinal Column Injury for three consecutive years for excellent clinical and laboratory work done during their research year.

The Neurosurgery Department has worked with several labs at Temple, covering a variety of areas in research. Some examples include:

Dr. Ronald Tuma, Department of Physiology:Focus on investigations of inflammatory reactions that contribute to CNS injury following stroke, trauma or autoimmune disease via the use of experimental animal models.

Dr. S. Ausim Azizi, Department of Neurology:Focus on cell-based therapies for repair and regeneration of the damaged CNS, signaling pathways of differentiation of adult stem cells into useful neuroal cells, and the feasibility of neurotransplantation.

Dr. Weaver/Dr. Khalili, Departments of Neurosurgery/Neuroscience:Several topics including molecular biology of neurotropic viruses in the brain, and a program in viral oncology focusing on CNS neoplasms.

Several clinical trials are also in progress at TUH under the guidance of the Neurosurgery faculty.

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Neurosurgery Residency Research | Lewis Katz School of ...

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Human Resources / Benefits / Workers’ Compensation / Panel

Posted: January 7, 2019 at 5:49 am

Foot & Ankle Institute**

School of Podiatric Medicine

3223 North Broad Street, Suite 150

Philadelphia, PA 19140

-or-

8th & Race Streets

Philadelphia, PA 19107

215-238-6600

General Surgery Department**

Temple University Hospital

3401 North Broad Street, Suite 466

4th Floor, Parkinson Pavilion

215-707-3133

Kornberg School of Dentistry**

Meredith Bogert, D.M.D.

3223 North Broad Street

2nd Floor

Philadelphia, PA 19140

215-707-5934

Neurology Department**

Temple University Hospital

3401 North Broad Street, Suite 525

5th Floor, Parkinson Pavilion

215-707-3040

Neurosurgery Department**

Temple University Hospital

3401 North Broad Street, Suite 540

5th Floor, Parkinson Pavilion

215-707-7200

Ophthalmology Department**

Temple University Hospital

3401 North Broad Street, Suite 640

6th Floor, Parkinson Pavilion

215-707-3185

-or-

Temple University Main Campus

1932 Liacouras Walk

Philadelphia, PA 19122

215-204-5636 / 215-204-5637

Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports Medicine and Physical Therapy**

Temple University Hospital

3509 North Broad Street

5th Floor, Boyer Pavilion

215-707-2111

http://www.templeortho.net

Physical Medicine/Therapy and Rehabilitation**

Temple University Hospital

3401 North Broad Street

Basement, Rock Pavilion

215-707-3646 / 215-707-2997

Temple Total Therapy (T3)

Steven J. Pettineo, MPT, DPT, CSCS

8th & Race Streets

Philadelphia, PA 19107

215-238-6600 / 215-629-4905 (FAX)

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery**

Temple University / Fox Chase Cancer Center

3322 North Broad Street

3rd Floor

Philadelphia, PA 19140

215-707-3935

Radiology**

(X-Rays, MRIs, and CT Scans)

Temple University Hospital

3401 North Broad Street

1st Floor, Parkinson Pavilion

215-707-XRAY (9729)

Tanenbaum & Associates Psychology

Robert L. Tanenbaum, Ph.D.

111 Presidential Boulevard, Suite 131

Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004

610-664-3442

Wahner Chiropractic

Barry A. Wahner, D.C.

4931 Wissahickon Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19144

215-842-2227

http://www.drwahner.com

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Human Resources / Benefits / Workers' Compensation / Panel

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


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