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Preston Medical Library | The University of Tennessee …

Posted: May 14, 2019 at 2:50 am

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Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Regenerative Medicine Market is expected to reach USD 79.8 …

Posted: May 12, 2019 at 5:53 pm

May 10, 2019 (Wired Hearld via COMTEX) -- The Exhaustive Study forldquo;Global Regenerative Medicine Marketrdquo;is added onAmeco Research. The report covers the market aspect and its growth forecasts across the coming years. It also includes a review of the key merchants moving in this market.

Global Regenerative Medicine Market is expected to reach USD 79.8 billion by 2024, at a Whopping CAGR of 20.5% from 2018 to 2024.

Factors driving the growth of the market are; increasing prevalence of degenerative and chronic diseases, technological advancements in nanotechnology, bioengineering and stem cell therapy, and increasing geriatric population across the globe. Moreover, limited number of organs available through donation and increasing investment by governments and private players is further augmenting the growth of the market. The years used for the assessment are as follows;

Historical year:2014, 2015, and 2016

Base year:2017

Forecast period:2018 ndash; 2024

Download Sample Copy Of This Report From Here: http://www.amecoresearch.com/sample/12357RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

The research and analysis is based on the data and information obtained from various primary and secondary sources. The data obtained is validated by interacting with the companies of the concerned domain. The steps involved in the research methodology are;

Obtaining historical data of the market based on news, articles, publications, government websites, annual reports, press releases, white papers, surveys, investor presentation of companies, and other secondary sources Interacting with key opinion leaders of the market and developing data points based on interaction with them Study of past trends in the market and their year on year Impact on the market size and share Analyzing the collected data points Bridging the data points to calculate the total global regenerative medicine market and its various segments Anticipating potential risks Analyzing market forces such as drivers, restraints, and opportunities to assess new growth areas for the global regenerative medicine market Finalizing the overall size and share of the global regenerative medicine market

OBJECTIVES:

To analyze market trends, opportunities, drivers, and restraints associated with the global regenerative medicine market To study market response with respect to the mergers and acquisitions in the industry To profile key companies operating in the regenerative medicine market and provide their competitive landscape

View Detail Report With Complete Table of [email protected] http://www.amecoresearch.com/market-report/global-regenerative-medicine-market--emr-12357

MARKET SCOPE

The research scope for global regenerative medicine market is as follows:

By Technology Cell Therapy Small Molecules and Biologics Tissue Engineering Gene Therapy

By Application Dermatology Dental Orthopedic Central Nervous System Diseases Cardiovascular Autoimmune Disorders Muscle Regeneration Ocular Diseases Oncology

By Geography North America Europe Asia-Pacific Central & South America Middle East and Africa

Free Analysis

Regenerative medicine has been recognized across the globe as a developing research field that offers the potential to revolutionize patients care. The strong demand of regenerative medicine products has been driven by increasing degenerative and chronic diseases, which place cost pressures on healthcare providers, and technological advancements in nanotechnology, bioengineering and stem cell therapy.

Geographically, the global Regenerative Medicine market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Central & South America, and Middle East and Africa. North America held the major share of the global market owing to the technological advancements in tissue engineering, and increasing investments in research and development activities. Moreover, increasing incidence of degenerative diseases and presence of advanced healthcare infrastructure is further propelling the industry growth in the region. The growth of the market in Europe is attributed to increasing aging population, and growing number of chronic diseases. Asia-Pacific is expected to witness the highest CAGR during 2018-2024, owing to increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, and rapidly growing healthcare sector. Moreover, growing development in stem cell therapy and tissue engineering are further propelling the market growth in the region. Furthermore, favorable government policies and increasing awareness among healthcare professionals are also boosting the industry growth in the region.

Some of the key companies operating in the market include Osiris Therapeutics, Inc., Novartis AG, TxCell, Inc., Cellectis, Inc., NuVasive, Inc., Integra LifeSciences Corporation, MiMedx Group, Inc., Cellular Biomedicine Group, Inc., Spark Therapeutics, Inc., and Vericel Corporation among others.

Few Significant Points From Table Of Contents:

Global Regenerative Medicine Market Outlook, Trend and Opportunity Analysis, Competitive Insights, Actionable Segmentation & Forecast 2024

CHAPTER 1. Market Scope and Methodology CHAPTER 2. Executive Summary CHAPTER 3. Industry Analysis CHAPTER 4. Competitive Outlook CHAPTER 5. Global Regenerative Medicine Market Size and Forecast (2014 ndash; 2024) CHAPTER 6. Global Regenerative Medicine Market, By Geography CHAPTER 7. Key Players and Strategic Developments

Quick Buy This Premium Report From Here: http://www.amecoresearch.com/buy/12357Contact: Email: [email protected] | + 1 407 915 4157

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Regenerative Medicine Market is expected to reach USD 79.8 ...

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Practice guideline recommendations … – n.neurology.org

Posted: May 12, 2019 at 5:51 pm

Tamara Pringsheim

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Michael S. Okun

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Kirsten Mller-Vahl

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Davide Martino

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Joseph Jankovic

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Andrea E. Cavanna

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Douglas W. Woods

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Michael Robinson

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Elizabeth Jarvie

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Veit Roessner

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Maryam Oskoui

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Yolanda Holler-Managan

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

John Piacentini

From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences (T.P., D.M.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (M.S.O.), Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy (K.M.-V.), Hannover Medical School, Germany; Department of Neurology (J.J.), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Neuropsychiatry (A.E.C.), BSMHFT, University of Birmingham and Aston University, UK; Department of Psychology (D.W.W.), Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI; Massachusetts Chapter (M.R.), Tourette Association of America, Bayside, NY; Waisman Center (E.J.), University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Technische Universitaet Dresden (V.R.), Germany; Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montral, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) (Y.H.-M.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (J.P.), Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles.

Go here to see the original:
Practice guideline recommendations ... - n.neurology.org

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

DeforestationCauses, Effects, and Solutions | Futurism

Posted: May 11, 2019 at 4:51 pm

28,000 species may go extinct in the next quarter century due to excessive deforestation. Rainforests contain the highest levels of biodiversity in the world, and without a diverse world, life will be unable to thrive. Diversity leads to unique adaptations and evolution and allows organisms to rely on each other to survive.

Soil erosion, floods, and wildlife extinction increase in global warming.

20% of the world's oxygen is produced in the Amazon rainforest.

There are more than 121 natural remedies in the rain forest are used as medicine.

25% of cancer-fighting organisms are found in the Amazon.

4500 acres of forests are cleared hourly by fires, bulldozers, machetes, etc.

Its estimated in 100 years there will be no rainforests at all.

Agriculture is the leading cause of deforestation. This also can cause infertility in the land due to overgrazing which will prevent the growth of new forests.

Each year forests the size of Panama are lost.

Deforestation is speeding up global warming.

The soil in forests is most but once the trees are cleared the soil has no protection and quickly dries out from sun exposure.

Financial profits are the main reason for deforestation.

Reusing/recycling paper and plastic bags can decrease deforestation.

Buying products with eco-friendly packaging will help prevent deforestation.

Clear-cutting is when one will cut part of a forest down, to help certain wildlife prosper or support a certain ecosystem. While this can be controversial, it can be beneficial and completely different than deforestation.

Agent Orange is a defoliant and herbicide, used in two wars. The British used Agent Orange to clear trees so insurgents were unable to hide behind them. They also killed crops to decrease the enemies food supply.

Orchids and Rafflesia are both endangered plants.

The highest percent of forest loss is Malaysia.

The highest area of forest loss is Brazil.

The 10 most threatened forests includeThe Amazon, Atlantic Forest/Gran Chaco, Borneo, Cerrado, Choco-Darien, Congo Basin, Eastern Africa, Eastern Australia, Greater Mekong, New Guinea, and Sumatra.

Palm oil harvesting is directly responsible for endangering the Sumatran Tiger, Orangutan, Bornean Pygmy Elephant, Sumatran Rhinoceros, and Malayan Sun Bear.

Rainforests cover 6% of the Earths surface but are home to 50% of plant and animal species.

Buy certified furniture and woodthis means it was legally cut down.

Buy recycled productsand continue to recycle or reuse your own products.

Original post:
DeforestationCauses, Effects, and Solutions | Futurism

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

What is biotechnology (biotech)? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Posted: May 11, 2019 at 4:50 pm

Biotechnology, often abbreviated to biotech, is the area of biology that uses living processes, organisms or systems to manufacture products or technology intended to improve the quality of human life. Depending on the technology, tools and applications involved, biotechnology can overlap with molecular biology, bionics, bioengineering, genetic engineering and nanotechnology.

By harnessing cellular and biomolecular processes, scientists can make advances and adaptations to technology in various fields. Traditional processes include using living organisms in their natural form, breeding new living organisms or modifying their genetic makeup. Successful applications of such processes have resulted in treatment of disease, environmental impact reduction and more efficient use of natural resources. Major biotech companies implement biotechnology as a practice to bring medical devices and products to the mainstream market.

Biotechnology, like other advanced technologies, has the potential for misuse. Concern about this has led to efforts by some groups to enact legislation restricting or banning certain processes or programs, such as human cloning and embryonic stem-cell research. There is also concern that if biotechnological processes are used by groups with nefarious intent, the end result could be biological warfare.

The science of biotechnology can be broken down into sub-disciplines based on common uses and applications.

Modern biotechnology can be used for a variety of applications, including:

See the article here:
What is biotechnology (biotech)? - Definition from WhatIs.com

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Japan responds: stem-cell therapy justified – nature.com

Posted: May 5, 2019 at 9:51 pm

As director-general of the Pharmaceutical Safety and Environmental Health Bureau of Japans Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, I cannot accept your criticism of our approval of stem-cell treatment for spinal-cord injuries (see Nature 565, 535536; 2019 and Nature 565, 544545; 2019).

Your criticism is based on the absence of double-blind studies for this treatment. But in this therapy, known as Stemirac, stem cells from the patients bone marrow are cultured externally and then returned to the patient. A double-blind study is therefore structurally impossible, and performing a sham operation on a control group would raise ethical issues.

In such cases, properly designed clinical studies can still test efficacy as demonstrated for drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as well as in Japan. Given the convincing response to Stemirac by the group of paralysed people under discussion, it could be unethical to withhold approval and deny treatment. The rationale for the safety, efficacy and quality of the product, and for the ethics of its approval, is given in the evaluation report by Japans Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (see go.nature.com/2uzyqk9; in Japanese).

You also criticize Japan for marketing products with questionable efficacy and for making patients bear the costs of clinical studies. However, under the terms of the countrys conditional and time-limited approval for regenerative medical products, such products are granted marketing authorization only when efficacy can be demonstrated in post-marketing studies within a specified period. And, because Stemirac is covered by national health insurance, patient payments are fixed at a feasible level.

S.M. is employed by Japans Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, which administers the countrys approval system for regenerative-medicine products.

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Link:
Japan responds: stem-cell therapy justified - nature.com

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


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