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Correlative three-dimensional super-resolution and block-face electron microscopy of whole vitreously frozen cells – Science Magazine

Posted: January 17, 2020 at 2:45 am

David P. Hoffman

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Gleb Shtengel

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

C. Shan Xu

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Kirby R. Campbell

Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

Melanie Freeman

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Lei Wang

Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Daniel E. Milkie

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

H. Amalia Pasolli

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Nirmala Iyer

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

John A. Bogovic

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Daniel R. Stabley

Neuroimaging Laboratory, St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

Abbas Shirinifard

Bioimage Analysis Core, St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

Song Pang

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

David Peale

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Kathy Schaefer

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Wim Pomp

Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Chi-Lun Chang

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Tom Kirchhausen

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

David J. Solecki

Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

Eric Betzig

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

Harald F. Hess

Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.

Here is the original post:
Correlative three-dimensional super-resolution and block-face electron microscopy of whole vitreously frozen cells - Science Magazine

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent Market Scope 2020 to 2026 with industry Growth Factors, Size, Share, Key Players, Trends and Top Regions – Fusion…

Posted: January 17, 2020 at 2:45 am

New market research report on global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market 2020 with industry growth analysis, size, share, trends and forecast 2026 is made available by QY Research.

The global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market is broadly and deeply studied in the report with key focus on the competitive landscape, regional growth, market segmentation, and market dynamics. We have used latest primary and secondary research techniques for compiling this comprehensive research study. The report offers Porters Five Forces analysis, PESTLE analysis, competitive analysis, manufacturing cost analysis, revenue and production analysis, and various other types of analysis to provide a complete view of the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market. Each segment of the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market is carefully analyzed on the basis of market share, CAGR, and other vital factors. The global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market is also statistically presented with the help of Y-o-Y growth, CAGR, revenue, production, and other important calculations.

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Market Segmentation:

Following are the segments covered by the report are:Liquid Double ReagentDry Powder Double Reagent

By Application:HospitalClinicLaboratory

Key Players:The Key manufacturers that are operating in the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market are:RocheSiemens HealthineersBeckman CoulterRandoxBioSinoBeijing Leadman BiochemistryFosunPharmaBeijing Strong BiotechnologiesDojindo LaboratoriesSysmexKAINOS LaboratoriesDAAN Gene

Regional GrowthThe report offers in-depth analysis of key regional and country-level Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent markets, taking into account their market size, CAGR, market potential, future developments, and other significant parameters. The Middle East and Africa (GCC Countries and Egypt) North America (the United States, Mexico, and Canada) South America (Brazil etc.) Europe (Turkey, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.) Asia-Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia, and Australia)

Key Questions Answered What will be the size and CAGR of the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market in 2025? Which product will gain the highest demand in the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market? Which application could show the best growth in the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market? What will be the nature of the competitive landscape in future? Which players will lead the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market in the coming years? Which region will gain the largest share of the global Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market?

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Table of Contents

Report Overview: It includes six chapters, viz. research scope, major manufacturers covered, market segments by type, Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market segments by application, study objectives, and years considered.

Global Growth Trends: There are three chapters included in this section, i.e. industry trends, the growth rate of key producers, and production analysis.

Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent Market Share by Manufacturer: Here, production, revenue, and price analysis by the manufacturer are included along with other chapters such as expansion plans and merger and acquisition, products offered by key manufacturers, and areas served and headquarters distribution.

Market Size by Type: It includes analysis of price, production value market share, and production market share by type.

Market Size by Application: This section includes Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market consumption analysis by application.

Profiles of Manufacturers: Here, leading players of the global market are studied based on sales area, key products, gross margin, revenue, price, and production.

Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent Market Value Chain and Sales Channel Analysis: It includes customer, distributor, Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent market value chain, and sales channel analysis.

Market Forecast Production Side: In this part of the report, the authors have focused on production and production value forecast, key producers forecast, and production and production value forecast by type.

About Us:QYResearch always pursuits high product quality with the belief that quality is the soul of business. Through years of effort and supports from huge number of customer supports, QYResearch consulting group has accumulated creative design methods on many high-quality markets investigation and research team with rich experience. Today, QYResearch has become the brand of quality assurance in consulting industry.

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Biochemical Diagnostic Reagent Market Scope 2020 to 2026 with industry Growth Factors, Size, Share, Key Players, Trends and Top Regions - Fusion...

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Januarys Rotary Youth of the… – Renton Reporter

Posted: January 17, 2020 at 2:45 am

Rotary members recognize three Renton School District high school students each month as Youth of the Month.

After being selected by counselors at each of the districts three comprehensive high schools, a selection committee of Rotary members review applications and interview students to identify those who will be selected as Youth of the Month.

The award is given to students who possess leadership abilities, maintain a good grade point average, participate in school activities and volunteer in their community.

January Rotary Youth of the Month are:

Megan Fung

Senior at Hazen High School

Megan holds a 3.9 GPA; she has been involved in Band, Key Club, HOSA, STEM Club and National Honor Society. She has received Solo and Ensemble Band ratings of Excellent and Superior and Outstanding Marcher Award.

Megan volunteers with the Bellevue Arts Museum, KidsQuest, local schools, Seattle Reign and many other fundraising events in the community.

She plans to attend a four-year university to major in a STEM field, like engineering and would like to intern at labs during her college years to gain experience and prepare for a career after she completes her degree. At this time, she hopes to become a chemical engineer.

Lauren Huynh

Senior at Hazen High School

Lauren holds a 3.9 GPA; she has been involved in Hazen Drill Team, Key Club, Philharmonic Orchestra, National Honor Society, Gordy Guides and Earth Corps. She has received Hazen Academic All-Star (multiple times), Soundview Orchestra Superior Ratings, Drill Team Academic State Champions, Varsity Letters, District and State Drill Awards, and 2019 National Drill Champion.

Outside of school, Lauren has been taking piano and viola lessons for many years.

She plans to attend a four-year college or university to study architecture or design and is interested in working as an interior designer for staging homes, hotels or businesses.

Connor Donahue

Senior at Lindbergh High School

Connor holds a 3.9 GPA; he has been involved in Key Club, National Honor Society, Class Senator, College Access Now, Eagle Crew and Lindbergh Swim. He has received AP Scholar with Distinction, Perfect Score-SAT II World History, Department Student of the Month, Outstanding Junior Award, OSHA and Microsoft JAVA Certification, Eagle of the Year Award, and State and District Swim placements/awards.

Connor works part-time as a lifeguard for the City of Renton and volunteers with Birthday Dreams and the Chinook Aquatic Club.

Hes planning to attend a private four-year college to pursue a degree in engineering or economics and is interested in a career in a STEM related field such as biochemistry or nuclear engineering.

Samirah Apdalhaliem

Senior at Renton High School

Samirah holds a 3.9 GPA; she has been involved in HOSA Club, Renton Peer Mentor, Renton Multicultural Festival and Renton High Tennis. She has received Honor Roll, Department Award and Citizenship/Academic Award.

Samirah works at the Samena Swim and Recreation Club as a front desk member and has spent time volunteering with the Woodland Park Zoo, Cham Refugee Community, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

She is planning to attend a four-year university, in Washington, majoring in Biology-Physiology. She hopes to continue her education to attend the University of Washington Medical School and pursue a career in medicine to give back to her community.

Continued here:
Januarys Rotary Youth of the... - Renton Reporter

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Could invisible aliens really exist among us? An astrobiologist explains – The Conversation UK

Posted: January 17, 2020 at 2:45 am

Life is pretty easy to recognise. It moves, it grows, it eats, it excretes, it reproduces. Simple. In biology, researchers often use the acronym MRSGREN to describe it. It stands for movement, respiration, sensitivity, growth, reproduction, excretion and nutrition.

But Helen Sharman, Britains first astronaut and a chemist at Imperial College London, recently said that alien lifeforms that are impossible to spot may be living among us. How could that be possible?

While life may be easy to recognise, its actually notoriously difficult to define and has had scientists and philosophers in debate for centuries if not millennia. For example, a 3D printer can reproduce itself, but we wouldnt call it alive. On the other hand, a mule is famously sterile, but we would never say it doesnt live.

As nobody can agree, there are more than 100 definitions of what life is. An alternative (but imperfect) approach is describing life as a self-sustaining chemical system capable of Darwinian evolution, which works for many cases we want to describe.

The lack of definition is a huge problem when it comes to searching for life in space. Not being able to define life other than well know it when we see it means we are truly limiting ourselves to geocentric, possibly even anthropocentric, ideas of what life looks like. When we think about aliens, we often picture a humanoid creature. But the intelligent life we are searching for doesnt have to be humanoid.

Sharman says she believes aliens exist and theres no two ways about it. Furthermore, she wonders: Will they be like you and me, made up of carbon and nitrogen? Maybe not. Its possible theyre here right now and we simply cant see them.

Such life would exist in a shadow biosphere. By that, I dont mean a ghost realm, but undiscovered creatures probably with a different biochemistry. This means we cant study or even notice them because they are outside of our comprehension. Assuming it exists, such a shadow biosphere would probably be microscopic.

So why havent we found it? We have limited ways of studying the microscopic world as only a small percentage of microbes can be cultured in a lab. This may mean that there could indeed be many lifeforms we havent yet spotted. We do now have the ability to sequence the DNA of unculturable strains of microbes, but this can only detect life as we know it that contain DNA.

If we find such a biosphere, however, it is unclear whether we should call it alien. That depends on whether we mean of extraterrestrial origin or simply unfamiliar.

A popular suggestion for an alternative biochemistry is one based on silicon rather than carbon. It makes sense, even from a geocentric point of view. Around 90% of the Earth is made up of silicon, iron, magnesium and oxygen, which means theres lots to go around for building potential life.

Silicon is similar to carbon, it has four electrons available for creating bonds with other atoms. But silicon is heavier, with 14 protons (protons make up the atomic nucleus with neutrons) compared to the six in the carbon nucleus. While carbon can create strong double and triple bonds to form long chains useful for many functions, such as building cell walls, it is much harder for silicon. It struggles to create strong bonds, so long-chain molecules are much less stable.

Whats more, common silicon compounds, such as silicon dioxide (or silica), are generally solid at terrestrial temperatures and insoluble in water. Compare this to highly soluble carbon dioxide, for example, and we see that carbon is more flexible and provides many more molecular possibilities.

Life on Earth is fundamentally different from the bulk composition of the Earth. Another argument against a silicon-based shadow biosphere is that too much silicon is locked up in rocks. In fact, the chemical composition of life on Earth has an approximate correlation with the chemical composition of the sun, with 98% of atoms in biology consisting of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon. So if there were viable silicon lifeforms here, they may have evolved elsewhere.

That said, there are arguments in favour of silicon-based life on Earth. Nature is adaptable. A few years ago, scientists at Caltech managed to breed a bacterial protein that created bonds with silicon essentially bringing silicon to life. So even though silicon is inflexible compared with carbon, it could perhaps find ways to assemble into living organisms, potentially including carbon.

And when it comes to other places in space, such as Saturns moon Titan or planets orbiting other stars, we certainly cant rule out the possibility of silicon-based life.

To find it, we have to somehow think outside of the terrestrial biology box and figure out ways of recognising lifeforms that are fundamentally different from the carbon-based form. There are plenty of experiments testing out these alternative biochemistries, such as the one from Caltech.

Regardless of the belief held by many that life exists elsewhere in the universe, we have no evidence for that. So it is important to consider all life as precious, no matter its size, quantity or location. The Earth supports the only known life in the universe. So no matter what form life elsewhere in the solar system or universe may take, we have to make sure we protect it from harmful contamination whether it is terrestrial life or alien lifeforms.

Read more: Elon Musks Starship may be more moral catastrophe than bold step in space exploration

So could aliens be among us? I dont believe that we have been visited by a life form with the technology to travel across the vast distances of space. But we do have evidence for life-forming, carbon-based molecules having arrived on Earth on meteorites, so the evidence certainly doesnt rule out the same possibility for more unfamiliar life forms.

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Could invisible aliens really exist among us? An astrobiologist explains - The Conversation UK

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Loss-Making Senzime AB (publ) (STO:SEZI) Expected To Breakeven – Simply Wall St

Posted: January 17, 2020 at 2:45 am

Senzime AB (publ)s (STO:SEZI): Senzime AB (publ) develops patient-oriented monitoring systems that assess patients biochemical and physiological processes before, during, and after surgery in Sweden. With the latest financial year loss of -kr25.6m and a trailing-twelve month of -kr35.4m, the kr931m market-cap amplifies its loss by moving further away from its breakeven target. As path to profitability is the topic on SEZIs investors mind, Ive decided to gauge market sentiment. In this article, I will touch on the expectations for SEZIs growth and when analysts expect the company to become profitable.

Check out our latest analysis for Senzime

According to the 2 industry analysts covering SEZI, the consensus is breakeven is near. They expect the company to post a final loss in 2021, before turning a profit of kr21m in 2022. So, SEZI is predicted to breakeven approximately 2 years from now. How fast will SEZI have to grow each year in order to reach the breakeven point by 2022? Working backwards from analyst estimates, it turns out that they expect the company to grow 63% year-on-year, on average, which signals high confidence from analysts. Should the business grow at a slower rate, it will become profitable at a later date than expected.

Im not going to go through company-specific developments for SEZI given that this is a high-level summary, though, keep in mind that by and large a high forecast growth rate is not unusual for a company that is currently undergoing an investment period.

One thing Id like to point out is that SEZI has no debt on its balance sheet, which is quite unusual for a cash-burning loss-making, growth company, which usually has a high level of debt relative to its equity. This means that SEZI has been operating purely on its equity investment and has no debt burden. This aspect reduces the risk around investing in the loss-making company.

There are key fundamentals of SEZI which are not covered in this article, but I must stress again that this is merely a basic overview. For a more comprehensive look at SEZI, take a look at SEZIs company page on Simply Wall St. Ive also put together a list of key factors you should further research:

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.

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Loss-Making Senzime AB (publ) (STO:SEZI) Expected To Breakeven - Simply Wall St

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

January: smoking cessation | News – University of Bristol

Posted: January 17, 2020 at 2:45 am

As smokers know all too well, nicotine is highly addictive. Its hard to quit smoking, a habit that claims the lives of more than seven million people each year.

Smoking tobacco delivers nicotine to the neuroreceptors responsible for addiction, affecting the nervous system and causing addiction.

A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, into the molecular interactions involved has revealed how these neuroreceptors respond to nicotine.

The researchers used new computational simulation methods to discover how receptors in the brain respond to nicotine.

One of the key features of the study is the speed at which the discovery was made, thanks to the use of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, which allowed the researchers to run a large number of simulations in unprecedentedly short time.

The work brought together computational chemists, biochemists and research software engineers, working together to deploy large numbers of simulations of nicotine receptors in the cloud.

Reducing the time to results to just five days using Oracles high-performance cloud infrastructure is transformational from a research perspective. Calculations that might otherwise have taken months to complete were completed in a matter of days.

The study, carried out by researchers from Bristol in partnership with Oracle, whose cloud technologies were a key part of the investigation, is reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the flagship publication of the American Chemical Society, the worlds largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research. The project was supported by funding from EPSRC.

Co-author of the study, Professor Adrian Mulholland, from Bristols Centre for Computational Chemistry, part of Bristols School of Chemistry, said: Nicotine is highly addictive: its very hard to give up smoking. To understand why it is so addictive, and to make molecules to help people quit, we need to understand how it affects the nervous system.

We have used simulations to model and understand how nicotine affects receptors in the brain. Using the power of cloud computing, we were able to show how nicotine exerts its effects, at the molecular level, the first stage of signaling in the brain. This information, and the methods we have developing, will help in developing new smoking cessation aids.

Researchers are now working with Achieve Life Sciences to design and develop molecules that mimic nicotine, and computer simulations that will help test their potential effectiveness. This work builds on previous studies using chemical synthetic approaches to develop new smoking cessation aids, which will be investigated and tested in simulation scenarios.

Smoking is the second most common cause of death worldwide, but most current anti-smoking drugs are only moderately effective in reducing symptoms of withdrawal and may cause undesirable side effects. New, specific and effective smoking cessation aids are needed.

Nicotine is the major psychoactive agent in tobacco and causes addiction by binding to specific receptors in the brain. Understanding how nicotine binds to these receptors and creates the nicotine hit and subsequent craving is a key focus for public health research.

The study saw researchers perform 450 individual molecular dynamics simulations of the biochemistry associated with the binding of nicotine to a subtype (7) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain. They were able to compare with other types nicotine receptor and identify common features of receptor activation.

The study also showed how cloud computing can be combined effectively with more traditional high-performance computing.

This work shows how rigorous simulations can be used to predict effects on drug targets in a matter of days.

On this quick timescale, calculations help to plan and interpret experiments, and will help design and develop effective drugs. More broadly, the agility and other benefits of using cloud computing for research offers the potential to accelerate the pace of discovery dramatically.

Paper:

A general mechanism for signal propagation in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor family by A. Oliveira, C. Edsall, C. Woods, P. Bates, G. Viedma-Nunez, S. Wonnacott, I. Bermudez, G. Ciccotti, T. Gallagher, R. Sessions and A. Mulholland in Journal of the American Chemical Society

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January: smoking cessation | News - University of Bristol

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


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