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The Art and Science of Palpation | Massage Professionals …

Posted: September 7, 2017 at 1:44 am

While seasoned massage therapists may take their sense of touch for granted, those newer to the profession quickly learn that palpating human tissue is no simple task. In addition to thoroughly comprehending anatomical structure, 13 exercises are suggested to help therapists recognize the tangible differences between body parts.

As healthcare professionals who navigate through their medium using touch, massage therapists are susceptible to the strengths and weaknesses of their own palpatory skills. A practitioner with a sensitive and responsive touch can adjust his or her applications accordingly, while one lacking these skills can make a faulty assessment, deliver a mediocre massage or even inflict accidental pain. While developing the ability to interpret what is felt underneath ones hands is a valued massage therapy skill, it is also one of the more obscure concepts to teach.

Although it is of major importance, memorizing a map of human anatomical structures is not enough preparation for learning how and where to apply bodywork. Because people come in all shapes and sizes, you can not simply superimpose any given diagram of anatomical landmarks on a client to locate the structure or muscle group being searched for. Most experts agree that there are several components to mastering palpation including combining the imaginative mind and drawing from the therapists knowledge of anatomy.

According to Leon Chaitow, ND, DO, Palpation cannot be learned by reading or listening; it can only be learned by palpation. He also says that an open mind is vital to the task of learning palpatory literacy practitioners with the greatest degree of rigidity, in terms of their training, often have the hardest time allowing themselves to feel new feelings and sense new sensations.

In accordance to John Upledger, DO, OMM, the developer of CranioSacral Therapy, Learning to trust your hands is not an easy task. You must learn to shut off your conscious, critical mind while you palpate for subtle changes in the body you are examining. You must adopt an attitude so that you may temporarily accept without question those perceptions which come into your brain from your hands. After you have developed your palpatory skill, you can criticize what you have felt with your hands. If you criticize before you learn to palpate, you will never learn to palpate.

Each tissue has a different tactile sensation. Since a practitioners fingers can literally only contact the skin, sensing the structures underneath is akin to trying to recognize types of food while blindfolded and wearing winter gloves. Below are some exercises devised by Mary Ann Foster, massage therapist and movement educator, to help develop a bodyworkers palpation skills of skin, superficial fascia, deep fascia, tendons, ligaments and muscle.

To explore the skin and superficial fascia:

To explore the deep fascia:

To explore tendons and ligaments:

To explore muscle tissue:

Although cognitive learning is essential, the ability to listen to what our hands are telling us is a vital component of delivering an effective massage. By developing palpation skills and carefully listening to a clients tissue with attentive hands, bodyworkers can transform into masters of their profession. As thinking and sensing merge together, the art and science of palpation takes full form leading to a stronger and more therapeutic connection for both practitioner and client.

Anatomy Review for ProfessionalsCranial-Sacral Fundamentals

References:

Adkins, Garry, NCTMB, Improving Palpation, Massage Today, May 2006.

Benjamin, Ben, PhD, Lets Talk About Palpation, Massage Today, February 2001.

Foster, Mary Ann, Listening Hands and Tissue Palpation, Massage & Bodywork, August/September 2006.

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The Art and Science of Palpation | Massage Professionals …

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Relieving Ulnar Nerve Tension in Guyon’s Canal | Massage …

Posted: September 7, 2017 at 1:44 am

Due to the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome, it may be mistakenly implicated in cases of neurological hand symptoms that worsen with wrist pressure. If Guyons canal syndrome is responsible, this structures unique anatomy requires a drastically different massage approach than that employed for problems of the carpal tunnel.

Referred to as handlebar palsy in the cycling community, Guyons canal syndrome (GCS) is an irritation of the ulnar nerve within the palm of the hand. Because compression from outside of Guyons canal is responsible for the offending symptoms, the practicing massage therapist must understand the involved anatomy and pathology in order to avoid exacerbating the clients discomfort.

The ulnar nerves primary role is to supply sensation to the little finger and lateral half of the ring finger. Additionally, it controls most of the little muscles in the hand that control fine movements as well as some of the forearm muscles responsible for creating a strong grip. Important for grasping objects, the adductor pollicis is often affected by ulnar nerve compression. Therefore, ulnar nerve problems not only cause little and ring finger tingling, but can also manifest as difficulty in holding objects in the hand, or clumsiness when performing precision activities such as writing.

In the wrist, Guyons canal is the tunnel formed by the pisiform and hamate bones and the flexor retinaculum ligament. Passing through this tunnel, the ulnar nerve is vulnerable to compressive forces on these structures. However, when evaluating symptoms of ulnar nerve compression, a practitioner must decipher the location of the suspected problem.

Causing similar types of symptoms, there are three primary areas where the ulnar nerve can be compressed:

Because the orientation of the ulnar nerve is unique in all three of these locations, massage approaches will differ for each area.

Marked by numbness and tingling in the ring and small fingers, GCS typically begins with the feeling of pins and needles. If this irritation persists, it is often followed by decreased sensation in the lateral part of the hand. When the small muscles of the hand become affected, weakness and clumsiness eventually result.

There are many causes of GCS, including trauma, fractures and small, benign tumors of the nerve or surrounding tissues of the tunnel. In addition to these structural problems, prolonged pressure on the wrist can cause this syndrome.

Guyons canal syndrome may occur as either an acute or chronic compression neuropathy. Acute injuries to Guyons canal occur most often when there is an abrupt force on the base of the hand while the wrist is in hyperextension. Falling on an outstretched hand is a good example. Chronic compression injuries occur from pressure maintained on the base of the hand for long periods. A common example is long-distance cycling, where the weight of the body is resting on the handlebars with the wrist in hyperextension.

Understanding the mechanics of nerve compression within Guyons canal can help a healthcare practitioner administer the most beneficial treatment. Since many people assume they have carpal tunnel syndrome with neurological symptoms in their hand worsening with wrist pressure, isolating the sensory symptoms of ulnar nerve distribution is important for an accurate assessment of GCS.

Because there are no tendons in Guyons canal to press on the nerve, pathological compression in GCS occurs from extrinsic factors. Extrinsic nerve compression happens when there is excessive force applied from outside the canal as opposed to pressure originating from inside the canal. In contrast, a condition like carpal tunnel syndrome involves intrinsic pressure because it comes from within the tunnel due to tendon swelling.

Once the appropriate tests reveal GCS, deliberately applied massage therapy offers sufferers an alternative to splinting and orthopedic surgery. Because GCS results from external forces causing compression on the ulnar nerve in the tunnel, massage strategies must focus on liberating the compressive force. While massage performed directly over the tunnel may worsen GCS symptoms and impair the healing process, techniques designed to decompress the nerve often provide much sought relief.

According to Doug Alexander, instructor of the Institutes Nerve Mobilization continuing education course, there are various ways to decompress the ulnar nerve in Guyons canal. In this distance-learning course, Alexander gives specific instruction on some of these techniques, including:

While nerve decompression is extremely valuable to someone struggling with GCS, Alexander cautions practitioners, You should not be creating any nerve compression symptoms during this process. If nerve symptoms are unavoidable, they should abate within a second or two of the completion of the manipulation. If they continue longer than that, you will need to explore less challenging manipulations until the nerve becomes less irritable.

While generalized massage strokes aiming at tissue compression can benefit many neurological symptoms, Guyons canal syndrome is an exception. By combining detailed study of the wrists anatomy and pathology with ulnar nerve decompression techniques, a massage therapist can feel confident in approaching compression within Guyons canal.

Advanced Anatomy and PathologyNerve Mobilization

Alexander, Doug, Nerve Mobilization Workbook, Natural Wellness, 2008.

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org, Ulnar Nerve Entrapment, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, 2007.

http://orthopedics.about.com, Guyons Canal Syndrome, Jonathan Cluett, MD, About, Inc., 2008.

Lowe Whitney, LMT, NCTMB, Median Nerve Compression Pathologies, Massage Today, October 2004.

Lowe, Whitney, LMT, NCTMB, Ulnar Nerve Entrapment, Massage Magazine, April 2005.

http://www.handsurgeon.com, Guyons Canal Syndrome, Hand Surgery Center of Brooklyn and Staten Island, 2008.

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Relieving Ulnar Nerve Tension in Guyon’s Canal | Massage …

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder | Massage …

Posted: September 7, 2017 at 1:44 am

Want to earn continuing education credit for this article? Learn more.

As massage therapists, we touch the body to help restore harmony and stay fit. Our clients place their welfare, literally, in our hands. Most come to us relatively healthy, asking us to treat specific aches or help reduce stress, but there are those arriving with untreated and, often unseen, wounds wounds perhaps inflicted upon them by others, either physical or psychological in nature.

With the military being so much in todays news, we are becoming more aware of the high incidence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in soldiers returning from combat. Distressed by what they see and experience, they may have difficulty readjusting to normal life.

Recent reports indicate that military troops diagnosed with PTSD jumped by approximately 50 percent in 2007. In 2006, 14,000 troops were diagnosed with this disorder, whereas only 1632 were diagnosed in 2003. Within four years the number jumped to 40,000 troops. With early treatment, chances for recovery are better, but PTSD symptoms may stay with them for the remainder of their lives.

Not only in the military, PTSD is also seen in victims of child abuse, domestic violence, national disasters and other traumatic events. Some individuals heal from these events and lead a normal life, but there are those who carry the burden of the trauma with them forever. The event is imprinted in their body, hidden and locked away.

Researchers believe that, at least in part, imprinted memories of these traumatic events remain as distant echoes of the experience. PTSD symptoms may surface later when something, even unrelated to the event, triggers a release of the traumatic experience.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) considers PTSD an anxiety disorder developed after being exposed to, either by direct experience or witnessing, an extreme or overwhelming traumatic event where they felt intense fear, helplessness or horror.

In our anatomy and physiology classes we learn that our nervous systems usually react to threatening situations with a flight or fight reaction. But researchers studying PTSD found some people react with a kind of freeze reaction instead, feeling helpless and hopeless during the trauma. Unable to either defend themselves or run away they, in effect, play dead, becoming numb to the experience. Though the memories of these experiences fade from everyday thoughts, they remain hidden in the nervous system and muscles where they become deeply imbedded.

Sometime after the initial experience, either almost immediately or in some cases much later, the person shows signs of PTSD, including hyper-vigilance, avoidant behavior and intrusive thoughts. These affect their everyday lives and those of their families, friends and co-workers. They may become depressed for prolonged periods, abuse drugs or alcohol, have obsessive/compulsive behaviors, anxiety attacks, flashbacks or simply withdraw from normal activities.

People want massage for a variety of reasons, but you will not usually hear I want massage for PTSD. They may not even be aware of it and instead come for a variety of other reasons such as stress, anxiety, having chronic pain or simply someone gave them a gift certificate.

You then proceed with a full-body Swedish massage, only to find they dont relax into it, but remain tense and alert, or completely dissociate from the experience. They may cry or have some other unexpected reaction. Even a thorough intake may not alert you that this person experienced a traumatic event that wounded not only their mind and spirit, but their body as well.

Even if the event doesnt directly involve the body, it remembers, on a visceral level, what the mind experienced. In working with the body, we can help heal those wounds. Working in conjunction with physicians and psychiatric professionals specializing in PTSD, massage therapists can help them be comfortable in their body, to learn to relax and be in the present moment.

If PTSD has been diagnosed, you can develop a plan of treatment that slowly introduces non-intrusive bodywork and leaves them feeling less vulnerable Chair massage is an easy way to establish trust between the massage therapist and the PTSD client with the person clothed, and sitting, not lying down. A chair massage can be as complete and relaxing a massage as one on the massage table. Initial sessions might be 15 minutes and over a period of time increase to 30 or 45 minutes.

Later you might introduce Shiatsu, bringing the bodywork from a sitting position, to one of lying on the floor, still fully clothed. Encourage the client to wear something loose and comfortable, such as a sweat suit or yoga attire to allow for stretches during the session.

Your sessions may never go beyond this phase, or might graduate into work done on the massage table such as cranial sacral work or polarity therapy, both of which can be done while the client is clothed. These techniques are non-intrusive and help re-harmonize the energies and rhythms of the persons body. They may also help reinforce work done with other medical professionals.

Massage therapy doesnt cure PTSD. Nothing cures it completely; sufferers merely learn how to live with it. But studies show that massage does improve associated symptoms such as chronic pain, immune system deficiencies and stress. PTSD sufferers have also been found to have elevated levels of cortisol, which leads to cognitive impairment, poor glucose management and lowered immune response, as well as interruption of homeostasis. Massage helps reduce cortisol blood levels, according to studies by the Touch Research Institute, and so lessens the damaging effects.

PTSD is not new, only newly defined and reexamined. It has been around, using different terms, for a very long time. It is a disorder with no hard and fast rules. For many it is a lifelong problem. Compassion, understanding and patience are a massage therapists most valuable tools in helping to assist the healing of their internal wounds.

Earn continuing education credit for this article contained in our Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) & Massage series. Click here to enroll.

Advanced Anatomy and PhysiologyChair MassageCranial Sacral FundamentalsEthical Case ManagementPolarity TherapyShiatsu Anma Therapy

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Massage Benefits and Precautions

Cutler, Nicole, L.Ac., The Therapeutic Relationship in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Institute for Integrative Healthcare, July 21, 2005.

Dryden, Trish, M.ED., RMT, and Fitch, Pamela, B.A., RMT, Recovering Body and Soul from PTSD, Massage Therapy Journal, Issue W107, American Massage Therapy Association, http://www.amtamassage.org.

Jelinek, Pauline, Number of Troops With PTSD Up 50 Percent, Associated Press, Washington, D.C., May 28, 2008, http://www.ap.org.

Levine, Peter A., Ph.D. Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma, North Atlantic Books, 1997, http://www.northatlanticbooks.com.

Matsatsakis, Aphrodite, Ph.D., I Cant Get Over It: A Handbook for Trauma Survivors, 2nd ed., New Harbinger Publications, Inc, 1996, http://www.newharbinger.com.Scaer, Robert, M.D. The Trauma Spectrum: Hidden Wounds and Human Resiliency, W.W. Norton, 2005, http://www.wwnorton.com.

Touch Research Institute, Movement and Massage Therapy Reduce Fibromyalgic Pain, Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Vol. 7, Issue 1, Jan. 2003, pgs 49-52

Fact Sheet What is PTSD?, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs,2008, http://www.va.gov.

Working With Trauma Survivors: What Workers Need to Know, National Center for PTSD Research, 2008, http://www.ncptsd.org.

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Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder | Massage …

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

‘Grey’s Anatomy’ Roundup: Who’s Leaving, Who Has a Budding Romance and Why the Show Is Going Back to Its … – BuddyTV (blog)

Posted: September 7, 2017 at 1:44 am

‘Grey’s Anatomy’ Roundup: Who’s Leaving, Who Has a Budding Romance and Why the Show Is Going Back to Its Roots for Season 14Wednesday, September 06, 2017

Who’s Out of Grey Sloan?

Going Back to Its Roots

Grey’s Anatomy will be welcoming backKrista Vernoff, who wrote and executive produced the series for its first eight seasons. The return of Vernoff is expected to bring back some much-needed levity.

“We’re touching base in a meaningful way with where we left off with all the characters from last season and to contain that much story in two hours, you have to keep it light, bouncy and fun — and Krista Vernoff brings that shift to the show,” added Kelly McCreary (Maggie).

“It’s funnier, it’s sexier, it’s lighter,” Gianniotti said. “We’re going to have fun this season. There’s just been a lot of separation and loss, so we want to show the characters having some fun. Also, a lot of the men are single now, so we’re going to explore what that dynamic is like.”

A Budding Romance

The season 13 finale seemingly paved the way for a potential new romance between Maggie and Jackson — courtesy of April, who took notice of the connection. This leaves plenty of questions not just among fans but for the characters involved as well. While it’s not yet safe to assume a April-Jackson-Maggie love triangle, Maggie (at least) will be dealing with April’s truth bomb.

What’s In Store for Jo?

The past several seasons have been tough on Jo but she may finally catch a break in season 14. Apart from exploring her domestic violence storyline, love may be in the cards for her as well.

“This season Jo may feel inspired by someone again,” added the actress, who has heard Jo may find a new mentor in Season 14.

And now that her best friend Stephanie (Jerrika Hinton) is no longer around, she may find someone else to lean on.

Eric Dane Reveals He’s Only Watched Three Episodes of Grey’s Anatomy

Eric Dane may have played Dr. Mark Sloan on Grey’s Anatomy for six seasons but that doesn’t mean he’s an avid fan who religiously watches the ABC series. In fact, he’s only seen three episodes during his time on the show.

That doesn’t mean, however, that he doesn’t keep in touch with some of his Grey’s Anatomy co-stars. “Shonda’s great,” said Dane, who is currently starring on The Last Ship. “I’m still friends with her to this day. One thing that you do with Shonda is that you don’t deviate. That’s one of the biggest lessons you learn, is that you stick to the script.”

Deleted Scene RevealsCatherine Almost Sidelined Bailey over Karev’s Assault

Meanwhile, here’s a peek at the fall promo for ABC’s Thursday lineup, which features Shonda Rhimes’ Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal and How to Get Away with Murder.

(Image courtesy of ABC)

Will Jo and DeLuca Get Together on Grey’s Anatomy?>>>

Who’s Out of Grey Sloan?

Going Back to Its Roots

Grey’s Anatomy will be welcoming backKrista Vernoff, who wrote and executive produced the series for its first eight seasons. The return of Vernoff is expected to bring back some much-needed levity.

“We’re touching base in a meaningful way with where we left off with all the characters from last season and to contain that much story in two hours, you have to keep it light, bouncy and fun — and Krista Vernoff brings that shift to the show,” added Kelly McCreary (Maggie).

“It’s funnier, it’s sexier, it’s lighter,” Gianniotti said. “We’re going to have fun this season. There’s just been a lot of separation and loss, so we want to show the characters having some fun. Also, a lot of the men are single now, so we’re going to explore what that dynamic is like.”

A Budding Romance

The season 13 finale seemingly paved the way for a potential new romance between Maggie and Jackson — courtesy of April, who took notice of the connection. This leaves plenty of questions not just among fans but for the characters involved as well. While it’s not yet safe to assume a April-Jackson-Maggie love triangle, Maggie (at least) will be dealing with April’s truth bomb.

What’s In Store for Jo?

The past several seasons have been tough on Jo but she may finally catch a break in season 14. Apart from exploring her domestic violence storyline, love may be in the cards for her as well.

“This season Jo may feel inspired by someone again,” added the actress, who has heard Jo may find a new mentor in Season 14.

And now that her best friend Stephanie (Jerrika Hinton) is no longer around, she may find someone else to lean on.

Eric Dane Reveals He’s Only Watched Three Episodes of Grey’s Anatomy

Eric Dane may have played Dr. Mark Sloan on Grey’s Anatomy for six seasons but that doesn’t mean he’s an avid fan who religiously watches the ABC series. In fact, he’s only seen three episodes during his time on the show.

That doesn’t mean, however, that he doesn’t keep in touch with some of his Grey’s Anatomy co-stars. “Shonda’s great,” said Dane, who is currently starring on The Last Ship. “I’m still friends with her to this day. One thing that you do with Shonda is that you don’t deviate. That’s one of the biggest lessons you learn, is that you stick to the script.”

Deleted Scene RevealsCatherine Almost Sidelined Bailey over Karev’s Assault

Meanwhile, here’s a peek at the fall promo for ABC’s Thursday lineup, which features Shonda Rhimes’ Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal and How to Get Away with Murder.

(Image courtesy of ABC)

Here is the original post:
‘Grey’s Anatomy’ Roundup: Who’s Leaving, Who Has a Budding Romance and Why the Show Is Going Back to Its … – BuddyTV (blog)

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

Grey’s Anatomy: Here are the major cast changes in season 14 – EW.com (blog)

Posted: September 7, 2017 at 1:44 am

Greys Anatomy will be undergoing some big changes in season 14.

Dont worry, characters like Meredith Grey (Ellen Pompeo) and Alex Karev (Justin Chambers) arent going anywhere, but a few familiar faces will be exiting or returning this year. EW has gathered the latest intel to help you keep track of the comings and goings at Grey Sloan this season:

Jerrika Hinton, who played Stephanie Edwards since season 9, exited as a series regular at the close of season 13. Tessa Ferrer, whose Dr. Leah Murphy was also part of the season 9 cast, had previously exited in season 10, but returned last year in a recurring status. However, shes not expected to be back in season 14. Marika Domiczyk, who joined the cast as Eliza Minnick, a recurring love interest for Arizona (Jessica Capshaw), will not return after her character was fired in the season 13 finale. Bridget Regan, who originally played Owens (Kevin McKidd) presumed-dead sister, has been recast with Abigail Spencer, who will recur in season 14.

Besides the addition of Spencer to the cast, Italian actress Stefania Spampinato joins in the recurring role of Andrew DeLucas (Giacomo Gianniotti) sister Carina, who boards the Grey Sloan crew as a controversial new doc.

Kim Raver, who exited the series in season 8, will reprise her role as Teddy Altman, while Matthew Morrison is expected to return as Jos abusive husband, Paul Stadler. For the record, here are all the regular characters returning: Meredith Grey, Alex Karev, Miranda Bailey (Chandra Wilson), Richard Webber (James Pickens Jr.), Owen Hunt, Arizona Robbins, April Kepner (Sarah Drew), Jackson Avery (Jesse Williams), Amelia Shepherd (Caterina Scorsone), Jo Wilson (Camilla Luddington), Maggie Pierce (Kelly McCreary), Ben Warren (Jason George), Nathan Riggs (Martin Henderson), Andrew DeLuca, and Catherine Avery (Debbie Allen).

Greys Anatomy returns with a two-hour premiere on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 8 p.m. ET on ABC.

Continued here:
Grey’s Anatomy: Here are the major cast changes in season 14 – EW.com (blog)

Recommendation and review posted by Guinevere Smith

Anatomy of an Inferno: How the Columbia River Gorge Fire Raced Out of Control – Willamette Week

Posted: September 7, 2017 at 1:44 am

The Columbia River Gorge is ablaze.

Oregon is a tinderbox, and the Gorge fire joins dozens of other wildfires burning across the state. But rarely has a fire burned such an iconic wilderness so close to Portland. Ash began drifting across the city Sept. 4 like a dirty snowstorm, the heaviest such fall many residents could recall since the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980.

A look at the fire’s progress shows how quickly it grew out of control, in a perfect storm of record heat, parched forests, high winds and teenage horseplay.

3:30 pm, Saturday, Sept. 2: A 15-year-old Vancouver, Wash., boy is seen tossing firecrackers off a cliff into the Eagle Creek canyon while a friend films the stunt (read a recounting here). Hikers soon observe trees on fire, and the trail to Punch Bowl Falls is choked with smoke. (1)

6 pm Saturday, Sept. 2: More than 150 hikers are trapped between the Eagle Creek fire and an ongoing blaze, the Indian Creek fire. They sleep overnight on the Eagle Creek Trail before a search-and-rescue team can retrieve them at Wahtum Lake on Sunday morning. (2)

7:25 am Sunday, Sept. 3: Feeding on a bone-dry forest, the fire grows to 3,200 acres. Evacuation notices are issued for parts of the town of Cascade Locks. (3)

4:15 pm Monday, Sept. 4: East winds push through the Gorge, spreading the fire rapidly west. State officials begin evacuating the towns of Warrendale and Dodson, and shut down 27 miles of Interstate 84. (4)

11 pm Monday, Sept. 4: Officials announce the fire has raced 4 miles in less than three hours, growing to 4,800 acres. “With strong winds like this, fire is impossible to fight,” warns the National Weather Service’s Portland office. “Focus is on evacuating areas in danger.” (5)

5 am Tuesday, Sept. 5: The fire roars another 8 miles west through the Mark O. Hatfield Wilderness, with winds blowing embers from ridge to ridge. Flames surround Multnomah Falls and are seen near Crown Point. Residents of parts of Troutdale are told to be ready to leave. (6)

10,000Minimum number of acres burning in the Columbia River Gorge at press deadline.

400Number of homes evacuated in the Gorge, including the towns of Corbett, Bridal Veil and Warrendale.

0Number of buildings damaged in the first 72 hours of the blaze.

Sept. 30Date state officials expect to have the wildfire completely under control.

WW staff intern Jessica Pollard contributed reporting to this story.

Originally posted here:
Anatomy of an Inferno: How the Columbia River Gorge Fire Raced Out of Control – Willamette Week

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko


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