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List of British monarchs by longevity – Wikipedia

Posted: March 25, 2019 at 12:48 am

Wikimedia list article

This is a list of British monarchs by longevity since the Union of the Crowns of England, Scotland and Ireland in 1603. To maintain consistency within the table, the dates of birth and death for each monarch are given in New Style. Two measures of the longevity are giventhis is to allow for the differing number of leap days occurring within the life of each monarch. The first column is the number of days between date of birth and date of death, allowing for leap days; the second column breaks this number down into years, and days, with the years being the number of whole years the monarch lived, and then days after his or her last birthday. Elizabeth II (queen since 6 February 1952), is the longest lived British sovereign.

*Updated daily according to UTC. While Queen Victoria lived for only 4 days more than George III in terms of years and days format, she actually lived for five days more because there were 20 leap days during Victoria's life and only 19 leap days during the life of George III.

If Charles, Prince of Wales, were to accede to the throne, he would immediately be ranked 8th with an age of 70years, 119days. If instead his son, William, Duke of Cambridge, were to accede any time before September 2030, he would be ranked 18th.

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List of British monarchs by longevity - Wikipedia

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Grand Challenge for Healthy Longevity – National Academy …

Posted: March 25, 2019 at 12:47 am

Dramatic breakthroughs in medicine, public health, and social and economic development have resulted in unprecedented extensions of the human lifespan across the world over the past century. This triumph for humanity provides new opportunities as well as new challenges. Globally, we are facing a major demographic shift. Today, 8.5% of people worldwide (617 million) are aged 65 and over. By 2050, this percentage is projected to more than double, reaching 1.6 billion. The global population of the oldest oldpeople aged 80 and olderis expected to more than triple between 2015 and 2050, growing from 126 million to 447 million.

At the current pace, population aging is poised to impose a significant strain on economies, health systems, and social structures worldwide. But it doesnt have to.We can envision, just on the horizon, an explosion of potential new medicines, treatments, technologies, and preventive and social strategies that could help transform the way we age and ensure better health, function, and productivity during a period of extended longevity. Multidisciplinary solutions are urgently needed to maximize the number of years lived in good health and a state of well-being. Now is the time to support the next breakthroughs in healthy longevity, so that all of us can benefit from the tremendous opportunities it has to offer.

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The National Academy of Medicine is launching a Grand Challenge for Healthy Longevity a major initiative to catalyze transformative innovation and inform policies and priorities to advance healthy aging and longevity globally. The initiative will have two components: a series of inducement prizes and awards to stimulate innovation and transform the field; and a comprehensive global roadmap report that will assess the challenges and opportunities of global aging with recommendations for action. The combined objectives of the initiative are to:

The Healthy Longevity Challenge Awards and Prizes will engage innovators, scientists, and entrepreneurs as they compete to catalyze breakthrough discoveries and technologies that will transform the field and stimulate new research and solutions around healthy longevity. The NAM has developed a model of major inducement prizes for breakthrough innovations built on a foundation of catalyst and proof-of-concept awards.

The Challenge will roll out over three distinct phases and employ a tiered model of awards and prizes. Phases 1-2 will prospectively fund new, bold ideas and advance promising research through catalyst and challenge awards respectively. Phase 3 will issue grand prizes to reward the achievement of bold, transformative innovations representing the culmination of previous research.

The Global Roadmap for Healthy Longevity will produce a comprehensive report assessing the challenges presented by global aging and demonstrating how these challenges can be translated into opportunities for societies globally through levers across policy, practice, and socioeconomic infrastructure. The report will be informed by workstreams in three domains: 1) research and innovation; 2) design and operation of healthcare delivery systems; and 3) social, economic, and physical enablers. Across these domains, particular considerations will be given to: policy and practice, health equity and disparities, technology solutions, sustainable financing, and monitoring metrics. The initiative will bring together thought leaders from science, medicine, health care systems, engineering, technology, economics, and policy to identify the necessary priorities and directions for improving health, productivity, and quality of life for older adults worldwide.

Fundraising for the Healthy Longevity Grand Challenge is ongoing. To learn more about the program or ways to get involved, please contact Elizabeth Finkelman at efinkelman@nas.edu.

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Laura Carstensen of the Stanford Center on Longevity delivers the keynote address at the 2015 NAM Annual Meeting

Innovation in Aging:Victor Dzau, Hal Barron, Joe Coughlin, J. Craig Venter, and Joon Yun

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Grand Challenge for Healthy Longevity - National Academy ...

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Systemic inflammation during midlife and … – n.neurology.org

Posted: March 23, 2019 at 8:47 pm

Keenan A. Walker

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

Rebecca F. Gottesman

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

Aozhou Wu

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

David S. Knopman

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

Alden L. Gross

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

Thomas H. Mosley

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

Elizabeth Selvin

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

B. Gwen Windham

From the Departments of Neurology (K.A.W., R.F.G.) and Epidemiology (R.F.G., A.W., A.L.G., E.S.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology (D.S.K.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Medicine (T.H.M., B.G.W.), Division of Geriatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

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Systemic inflammation during midlife and ... - n.neurology.org

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Neurology – MU Health Care – Columbia, MO

Posted: March 23, 2019 at 8:47 pm

When you need expert care for diseases affecting your brain, spinal cord or nervous system, the neurologists at University of Missouri Health Care provide the most advanced care in central Missouri.

We offer the widest range of options and the most advanced medical capabilities for neurological disorders in the region, including specialized care for kids.

Neurological diseases involve different parts of the nervous system, so our neurologycare team includes specialists in brain and spinal cordillness, muscle and joint conditions and other medical specialties. We create your care team based on your unique needs.

As an academic health center, MU Health Care has experts in every medical specialty. Thats important for you because it means you can get all your care in a single place. Regardless of your condition, we have the expertise and resources to offer you complete care.

Our neurologists are also researchers and educators, so your care team is knowledgeable about the latest therapies. If theres a promising new treatment, youll find it at MU Health Care including treatments only available through clinical trials. Our doctors are on the forefront of the latest discoveries in neurological disease research.

Neurologicaldiseases require complex care from a number of specialists, so we make your care as convenient as possible. Your care team may include doctors, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, respiratory and rehabilitation therapists, orthotists (clinicians who specialize in limb and spine braces or prostheses) and other clinicians.

We treat many types of neurological diseases, including:

Your neurologist will design a care plan that helps you maintain as much independence and function as possible. We draw from a variety of services to help improve your quality of life and support you and your family, including:

At MU Health Care, youll receive a full spectrum of personalized neurological care and services.

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Neurology - MU Health Care - Columbia, MO

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Neurology | Vancouver Clinic

Posted: March 23, 2019 at 8:47 pm

Is there a cure for Alzheimers disease?

Some Alzheimers disease medications and management strategies may temporarily improve symptoms, thereby helping people with Alzheimers gain greater independence and maintain a good quality of life. However, there is no cure for Alzheimers disease, and its important to seek supportive services as early as possible.

An athletes prior history of concussions is perhaps the biggest risk factor related to his or her risk for another concussion. Research shows that if someone has already suffered one concussion, they are one- to two-times more likely to suffer another. The more concussions they suffer, the more their risk goes up.

Studies also show that females are more likely than males to sustain concussions, and that they require more recovery time. This is most likely due to a number of anatomical and biomechanical differences between genders.

Lastly, a history of developmental disorders, psychiatric disorders, or headaches/migraines can play a part in concussion recovery time. Since new research on concussions is always coming out, its important that coaches, trainers, parents, and athletes themselves stay up-to-date on information related to prevention and treatment.

First, there is a strong correlation between changes to your vision and the brain. For instance, strokes, aneurysms, brain tumors and even a brain infection can cause visual problems.

With that said, your first stop should be to either check in with an eye doctor, or consult your family physician. Plenty of visual problems are related to the eye itself, such as cataracts, glaucoma or astigmatism. If, after an eye exam, everything checks out, or if the problem includes other issues such as dizziness or migraines, make an appointment with the neurology department right away.

Neurologists do not perform surgery, but can recommend surgical treatment and refer patients to the appropriate surgeon if necessary.

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Neurology | Vancouver Clinic

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart? – Mayo Clinic

Posted: March 23, 2019 at 8:44 pm

Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

Red wine and something in red wine called resveratrol might be heart healthy. Find out the facts, and hype, regarding red wine and its impact on your heart.

Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent coronary artery disease, the condition that leads to heart attacks.

Any links between red wine and fewer heart attacks aren't completely understood. But part of the benefit might be that antioxidants may increase levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol) and protect against cholesterol buildup.

While the news about red wine might sound great if you enjoy a glass of red wine with your evening meal, doctors are wary of encouraging anyone to start drinking alcohol, especially if you have a family history of alcohol abuse. Too much alcohol can have many harmful effects on your body.

Still, many doctors agree that something in red wine appears to help your heart. It's possible that antioxidants, such as flavonoids or a substance called resveratrol, have heart-healthy benefits.

Red wine seems to have heart-healthy benefits. But it's possible that red wine isn't any better than beer, white wine or liquor for heart health. There's still no clear evidence that red wine is better than other forms of alcohol when it comes to possible heart-healthy benefits.

Antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that's gotten attention.

Resveratrol might be a key ingredient in red wine that helps prevent damage to blood vessels, reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (the "bad" cholesterol) and prevents blood clots. Some research shows that resveratrol could be linked to a lower risk of inflammation and blood clotting, which can lead to heart disease. But other studies found no benefits from resveratrol in preventing heart disease.

More research is needed to determine if resveratrol lowers the risk of inflammation and blood clotting.

The resveratrol in red wine comes from the skin of grapes used to make wine. Because red wine is fermented with grape skins longer than is white wine, red wine contains more resveratrol.

Simply eating grapes, or drinking grape juice, might be one way to get resveratrol without drinking alcohol. Red and purple grape juices may have some of the same heart-healthy benefits of red wine.

Other foods that contain some resveratrol include peanuts, blueberries and cranberries. It's not yet known how beneficial eating grapes or other foods might be compared with drinking red wine when it comes to promoting heart health. The amount of resveratrol in food and red wine can vary widely.

Resveratrol supplements also are available. Researchers haven't found any harm in taking resveratrol supplements. But your body can't absorb most of the resveratrol in the supplements.

Various studies have shown that moderate amounts of all types of alcohol benefit your heart, not just alcohol found in red wine. It's thought that alcohol:

Red wine's potential heart-healthy benefits look promising. Those who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, including red wine, seem to have a lower risk of heart disease.

However, it's important to understand that studies comparing moderate drinkers to non-drinkers might overestimate the benefits of moderate drinking because non-drinkers might already have health problems. More research is needed before we know whether red wine is better for your heart than are other forms of alcohol, such as beer or spirits.

Neither the American Heart Association nor the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommends that you start drinking alcohol just to prevent heart disease. Alcohol can be addictive and can cause or worsen other health problems.

Drinking too much alcohol increases your risk of:

Avoid alcohol completely if you:

If you have questions about the benefits and risks of alcohol, talk to your doctor about specific recommendations for you.

If you already drink red wine, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means:

A drink is defined as:

.

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Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart? - Mayo Clinic

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