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LONGEVITY | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Posted: February 14, 2019 at 12:45 am

Early growth determines longevity in male rats and may be related to telomere shortening in the kidney.

Different letters above the columns indicate significant differences in longevity, the number within the columns indicates the number of replicates.

He commented that infection longevity might be conducive to multiple infections or that species may occupy different sites within the snail, making coexistence possible.

The aging lung the contribution of elastin and collagen, which are insoluble extracellular proteins characterized by their longevity, strength and resistance to destruction.

While very similar features have been found to increase ' happiness', we find them to be somewhat significant in explaining longevity.

If so, then increased longevity is much less of a problem than improved technology linked to increased expectations.

Of course, other factors might also be influential, including revisions in expectations of longevity.

In addition, it is not known whether patients' expectations of their longevity affect their psychological wellbeing.

Under this hypothesis, gigantism is viewed as a host adaptation that improves host survival beyond the longevity of the parasite.

I also present the alternative hypothesis, discussing why higher levels of initial political competition may increase the longevity of a democracy.

Prolonged longevity in both societies also means that family carers have been ageing, and periods of care have often become prolonged.

Otherwise, how can we account for his longevity and for his remarkable comebacks ?

Whilst the impact of increasing longevity has been significant, the effect has been much less than that of interest rates.

Therefore, control strategies that can limit transmission as well as drug pressure and thereby extend longevity of antimalarials in malaria endemic areas should be considered.

The natural longevity of the mongoose is not known, but some individuals have been reported to survive up to 13 years in captivity.

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LONGEVITY | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Effect of aerobic exercise on cognition in … – n.neurology.org

Posted: February 14, 2019 at 12:43 am

Yaakov Stern

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Anna MacKay-Brandt

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Seonjoo Lee

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Paula McKinley

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Kathleen McIntyre

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Qolamreza Razlighi

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Emil Agarunov

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Matthew Bartels

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

Richard P. Sloan

From the Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute (Y.S., A.M.-B., Q.R., E.A.), Department of Biostatistics (S.L.), and Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine (P.M., K.M., R.P.S.), Columbia University, New York; Division of Clinical Research (A.M.-B.), Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg; Division of Biostatistics (S.L.), New York State Psychiatric Institute; and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and the Human Performance Laboratory (M.B.), Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY.

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Effect of aerobic exercise on cognition in ... - n.neurology.org

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Stem Cell Therapy for Sports Injuries – Sports-health

Posted: February 13, 2019 at 6:48 am

Many doctors and athletes use stem cell therapy to treat sports injuries, such as Achilles tendinopathy or damaged knee ligaments.

Some physicians use stem cells to repair damaged knee cartilage.Read Knee Cartilage Repair, Regeneration, and Replacement

While increasing in popularity, stem cell therapy is not considered standard practice by sports medicine doctors and not covered by most insurance companies. Patients considering paying out-of-pocket are advised to learn about stem cells potentialand limitationsfor treating sports injuries.

See Treating Acute Sports and Exercise Injuries in the First 24 to 72 Hours

Article continues below

Doctors use stem cells to treat a wide variety of sports injuries, including damage to:

These injuries may be due to a one-time trauma or chronic overuse.

Stem cells can be applied to an injured area via:

See Regenerative Medicine for Sports Injuries

When administering injections, many physicians use ultrasound or other medical imaging to ensure cells are delivered precisely to the site of damaged tissue.

See Types of Regenerative Medicine for Sports Injuries

Stem cells are different than skin cells, muscle cells, liver cells, or any other human cells. What makes stem cells special is that they can:

Many physicians who use stem cell therapy hypothesize that, when placed into a certain environment, stem cells can transform to meet a certain need. For example, stem cells that are placed near damaged Achilles tendon are hypothesized to develop into healthy Achilles tendon cells.

In almost all cases, the stem cells used in sports medicine come from the patient. Clinical use of fetal or embryonic stem cells is banned in United States.

The process of collecting stem cells is often called harvesting. Physicians usually harvest stem cells from the patients fat, blood, or bone marrow.

Before a bone marrow aspiration, a patient is given a local anesthetic and may also be given a sedative.

Mesenchymal stem cellsAll three types of stem cells listed aboveadipose (fat), peripheral blood, and bone marrowbelong to a category of stem cells called mesenchymal stem cells. These stem cells, sometimes called adult stem cells, can be obtained from the patients own body and are being increasingly used for treating sports injuries.

See What Are Stem Cells? on Arthritis-health.com to learn more.

Right now, there are no formal medical guidelines regarding who can receive stem cell therapy for sports injuries. Whether or not to use stem cells for treatment is up to patients and their doctors. A lack of standardization further complicates the nature of treatment at one clinic versus another.

See Who Is a Candidate for Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy?

Some doctors have certain criteria for recommending stem cell therapy. For example, they only recommend it to patients who are healthy and younger (e.g. under 50). Other doctors make recommendations on a case-by-case basis.

Read more here:
Stem Cell Therapy for Sports Injuries - Sports-health

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Stem cell therapy for hip | Mayo Clinic Connect

Posted: February 13, 2019 at 6:48 am

@kdukes52, there are several discussions about stem cell therapy in the Bones, Joints & Muscles group. Here are a few you may wish to review:

Stem Cell Therapy for Rotator Cuff Tears https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/stem-cell-therapy-for-rotator-cuff-tears/ Stem Cell Therapy for Arthritic Knees https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/stem-cell-therapy-for-arthritic-knees/ Has anyone used PRP or Stem Cell Therapy to fix cervical discs https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/has-anyone-used-prp-or-stem-cell-therapy-to-fix-cervical-discs/

While these discussions are not specific to regenerative medicine for the hip, I think you'll find a lot of relevant and related information. I'm also tagging fellow members @gailb @cobweb and @winning to join this discussion.

It is so important to do your homework and due diligence when researching new treatment options. Stem cells offer a lot of hope. But where these is hope, there is hype and charlatans as this FDA warning illustrates: FDA acts to remove unproven, potentially harmful treatment used in stem cell centers targeting vulnerable patients https://www.fda.gov/newsevents/newsroom/pressannouncements/ucm573427.htm

You can read more about stem cells on the FDAs website here: https://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/Transparency/Basics/ucm194655.htm

Another service I encourage you to take advantage of is Mayo Clinics Regenerative Medicine free Consult Service. If you call them, you will talk to a live person who will provide more information, research, and advice on seeking stem cell therapy from reputable providers, even if that provider is not Mayo Clinic. Their primary goal is to educate and help you find effective treatment.

Furthermore, you can add your name to a database to be notified when additional studies and information become available. Heres more information about the stem cell Consult Service http://www.mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/center-regenerative-medicine/patient-care/clinical-services/regenerative-medicine-consult-service. Or simply call 1-844-276-2003 to speak with one of our experts.

Phew, that's a long-winded response to your simple question Kdukes. Are you considering a hip replacement?

Visit link:
Stem cell therapy for hip | Mayo Clinic Connect

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Stem Cell Therapy – Nebraska Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine

Posted: February 13, 2019 at 6:48 am

Why Nebraska Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine?

Nebraska Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine has decades of experience providing the latest in orthopaedic procedures. We offer the entire range of treatments from conservative to surgical. The doctors at Nebraska Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine can help you choose the best treatment for YOU. Many clinics offering stem cell treatments for orthopaedic conditions are NOT orthopaedic doctors. When considering a clinic for stem cell treatment, you need to consider a doctors training and experience. Nebraska Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine is the only orthopaedic clinic in the region offering this exciting procedure.

Patients between the ages of18-64who have seen a physician for their condition and have exhausted all non-surgical measures (physical therapy, NSAIDs, cortisone injections, bracing, etc.) are ideal for Stem Cell Therapy

Shoulders, hips and knees will be the most common; however any joint or tendon can be treated using this procedure.

Because this is a newer treatment, the long-term outcomes are not fully understood and no guarantees can be made regarding outcomes.

Patients can expect to feel results over 1-3 months, although in some circumstances, relief may take as long as 6-9 months.

Because this is a newer treatment, the long-term outcomes are not fully understood and no guarantees can be made regarding outcomes.

Patients can expect to feel results over 1-3 months, although in some circumstances, relief may take as long as 6-9 months.

To schedule an appointment with Scott Swanson, MD, call (402) 488-3322. Dr. Swanson will assess you at an initial office visit to determine whether stem cell therapy is right for you.

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Stem Cell Therapy - Nebraska Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Stem Cell Therapy – State of the art treatment for pain

Posted: February 13, 2019 at 6:47 am

What is the process for Stem Cell Therapy?

In most cases, 2 oz. (60 cc) of bone marrow aspirate is required. The aspirate includes platelets, mesenchymal stem cells, and other kinds of stem cells used in adult stem cell therapy. After aspiration, the stem cell tissue is separated from non-useful substances and cells via multiple filtration techniques. The bone marrow is placed inside a special container, which in turn is placed into a machine known as a centrifuge. The centrifuge spins the material at a high rate of speed, and this process separates the platelets and stem cells from the remainder of the blood products. It is this concentration of bone marrowcalled BMAC, or bone marrow aspiration concentrate that is injected to the site of tissue damage or injury. We use ultrasound and nerve stimulator guidance to increase the accuracy of administration

Once introduced, the platelets then release signal proteins and growth factors which activate the stem cells to divide rapidly. Stem cells by themselves are unable to repair the injured area. These cells have to be properly directed, and platelets perform this function. In effect, stem cells are construction workers and the platelets are their supervisors. Once they are activated, these stem cells perform a variety of valuable functions. Apart from repairing damage to the injured areas, they help damaged cells repair themselves and participate in the repairing process.

Follow this link:
Stem Cell Therapy - State of the art treatment for pain

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


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