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"The Secret Museum: Collections as Muse," Artist Talk and Artifacts from the Stores, Natural History Museum, London, Thursday July 7

Posted: July 10, 2011 at 3:58 pm


Hi all! Will be giving a free and open-to-the-public artist's talk augmented by artifacts drawn from the stores at the London Natural History Museum this Thursday at 2:30. Full details follow; hope very much to see you there!

The Secret Museum: Collections as Muse with artist Joanna Ebenstein
Artist Talk with Artifacts from the Stores
Museum of Natural History, London, Attenborough Studio
Thursday July 7
2:30 PM

Ancient wood and glass cases, elaborate labels from centuries past, rows of dusty bell jars, atmospherically decayed specimens, the unintentionally surreal and sublime vistas of the Museum backstage... these are the kinds of things that intrigue and inspire New York artist Joanna Ebenstein. Today, join her for a look at some of her artwork engaging with these themes. Also on view will be a variety of rarely seen artifacts specially drawn for this talk from the Natural History Museum's extensive and astounding stores.

More here.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Chocolate compounds fight high cholesterol

Posted: July 10, 2011 at 3:57 pm

Chocolate has received a lot of attention for being a treasure trove of nutritional goodness. Polyphenols in cacao beans are linked to promoting heart, brain, and liver health, which has sparked renewed interest in chocolate as a medicinal food. And a new study adds to the growing list of benefits, showing that chocolate polyphenols also help to lower bad cholesterol.

Published in the journal Diabetic Medicine, the study tested the effects of polyphenol-rich chocolate in a group of 12 volunteers with type-2 diabetes. After 16 weeks, the researchers from Hull University in the U.K. discovered that the polyphenols helped lower participants' bad cholesterol levels while raising good cholesterol levels.

"Chocolate with a high cocoa content should be included in the diet of individuals with type-2 diabetes as part of a sensible, balanced approach to diet and lifestyle," said professor Steve Akin, author of the study.Read more...

AyurGold for Healthy Blood

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

The Biologically-Inspired Glass Work of Danish Artist Steffan Dam

Posted: July 10, 2011 at 9:06 am







Wow. I have just come across the exquisite, biologically-inspired glass work of Danish artist Steffan Dam. The work--organized into series titled "Flower Blocks," "Specimen Blocks," "Fossils" and "Marine Biology--reminds me quite a bit of the work of revered natural history artists Ernst Heackel and Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka.

Above are just a few of my favorite pieces; I highly encourage you to visit the website to see the full collection by clicking here; you can also download a PDF catalog of his work by clicking here.

Via Wunderkammer.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Cabinet Cards / Storydress II, Albumen Print Photographs of Life-size Paper Mache and Plaster Sculpture, Christine Elfman, 2008

Posted: July 10, 2011 at 8:23 am

Cabinet Cards / Storydress II

albumen prints from wet-plate collodion negatives
4.25 x 6.5 inches, series of 5 mounted on cabinet cards
6.5 x 8.5 inches, series of 10 framed
2008

Storydress II is a series of photographs of a life-size paper mache and plaster sculpture. The dress is made of paper mache stories that I recorded of my great-grandmother’s autobiographical reminiscences. Each photograph contains legible words. The sculpture was photographed with the wet-plate collodion negative process, printed on handmade gold-toned Albumen paper, and burnished onto antique Cabinet Card mounts. For exhibition the cabinet card photographs are displayed using an antique wooden Graphoscope (magnifying device) and shelf.

Finding unknown relatives in my family photograph collection, and noticing old photographs of anonymous people in antique stores, I was taken by how many people were forgotten regardless of photography’s intention to “Secure the shadow, ‘ere the substance fades away.” The older the picture, the more forlorn the subject appeared to me. Holding their image, I was impressed with their absence. Storydress II tries to show this underlying subject of photographic portraiture. The 19th century cabinet card is turned inside out, revealing the presence of absence in a medium characterized by rigid detail and anonymity. The figure of reminiscence, cast in plaster, parallels the poetic immobility of the head clamp, used in early photography to prevent movement during long exposures, aptly defined by Barthes as “the corset of my imaginary existence”. The life size cast figure wears a paper mache dress made of family stories: recorded, torn up, and glued back together again. The tedious processes involved in making both the subject and photograph are offerings to time’s taking.

I really, really love this piece--which uses as its base a life-size paper mache and plaster sculpture!--and encourage you to visit Christine Elfman's website and click on "view close up here" to appreciate it fully. Or click on image to see a pleasing larger version.

Via Foxes in Breeches.

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Parkinson’s disease: real story

Posted: July 5, 2011 at 3:15 pm

Usually considered an older person's disease, Karen Rose was diagnosed with Parkinson's at just 34. She talks about the impact it's had on her life over the past ten years.

Follow this link:
Parkinson's disease: real story

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko

Parkinson's disease: real story

Posted: July 5, 2011 at 3:15 pm

Usually considered an older person's disease, Karen Rose was diagnosed with Parkinson's at just 34. She talks about the impact it's had on her life over the past ten years.

Follow this link:
Parkinson's disease: real story

Recommendation and review posted by Fredricko


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