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Sarah Yakawonis – Anatomical Quilling

Posted: October 30, 2011 at 3:52 pm

Sarah Yakawonis head anatomy quilling

Sarah Yakawonis neck anatomy quilling

Yakawonis

Sarah Yakawonis, a Portland based artist and designer, has created these and many more anatomical delights using a technique called quilling.

According to Wikipedia, quilling refers to “the use of strips of paper that are rolled, shaped, and glued together to create decorative designs. The paper is wound around a quill to create a basic coil shape. The paper is glued at the tip and the coil shaped, these shaped coils are arranged to form flowers, leaves, and various ornamental patterns similar to ironwork.”

I didn’t read anything about making badass anatomical art in there; apparently Yakawonis is a next level quiller.  I am super impressed by all of her work, which you can check out on her website, yakawonis.com and on her blogspot.

 

Source:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/streetanatomy/OQuC

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Memento Mori Catrina Limited Print Release

Posted: October 30, 2011 at 3:52 pm

Just in time for Day of the Dead, London-based medical illustrator, Emily Evans has released 10 of these gorgeous prints exclusively for Street Anatomy! I had the opportunity of bringing these prints back with me to Chicago directly from Emily’s studio in London. Available for $50 at the Street Anatomy store [Update: only 3 left]

Emily Evans Memento Mori Catrina Day of the Dead

Emily Evans Memento Mori Catrina Day of the Dead

Emily Evans Memento Mori Catrina Day of the DeadEmily Evans Memento Mori Catrina Day of the Dead

  • A3 11.7″ x 16.5″ Giclee print on Canson Aquarelle rag paper
  • Gorgeous print quality on artistic paper gives the print a hand drawn feel
  • Signed by artist
  • Prints hand imported directly from London, UK
  • Only 10 available

Emily says of her piece:
Inspired by the Mexican ‘Day of the Dead’ celebrations, which celebrate those that have passed as well as remind the living of their own mortality. La Calavera Catrina (The Elegant Skull) was depicted by Posada as an upper class woman who was still at the mercy of death regardless of her status. This piece represents the idea of our own anatomy and mortality lying beneath the values of beauty and sexuality which bring power in modern times.

Available for $50 at the Street Anatomy store.

If you have any inquires, please don’t hesitate to contact me personally at vanessa[a]streetanatomy.com

 

 

Source:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/streetanatomy/OQuC

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Bonni Reid

Posted: October 30, 2011 at 3:52 pm

Bonni Reid Organica

Bonni Reid Fortune

Bonni Reid Heart Strings

Bonni Reid, another Canadian lady like myself, is a Vancouver based artist, designer, and animation colour stylist. Her style seems to mesh the mechanics of the external world with the mechanics of the inner world: the anatomy and the psychology.

Her entire website is filled with little anatomical gems, from the heart in the menu to the banner of exhibit B.
Check out all of her work on her personal website, bonnireid.com.

Source:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/streetanatomy/OQuC

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

“Metaphor as Illness,” Lecture by Mark Dery, Embodied Fantasies Conference, Sunday October 30

Posted: October 30, 2011 at 3:52 pm


Mark Dery, one of my favorite all time thinkers and lecturers, will be giving a new presentation this Sunday as part of the amazing looking Embodied Fantasies Conference. Full details, drawn for his Shovelware blog, below; hope to see you there!

Live, from the Cancer Ward!
I’ll be lecturing on “Metaphor as Illness” at the School of Visual Arts this Sunday, at 1:30 P.M., in a double-header with media theorist McKenzie Wark.

Executive Summary: A personal essay—live, from the cancer ward!—that is simultaneously a philosophical investigation into the ways in which disease widens the Cartesian chasm, untethering our thought balloons from the Body in Pain.

Directions, program, list of speakers, HERE.

Teaser: During my recent hospitalization for a medical emergency—an unexpected vacation in hell, during which I had boundless hours to muse about Illness as Metaphor and The Body in Pain—I conceived the essay in question, an essay that simply had to be written, as a meditation on language, embodiment, language as embodiment, and the ontologically dislocating experience of being a patient. Drawing on my five-year tour of duty through ER’s, OR’s, and hospital wards as a cancer patient, the lecture in question combines a cultural criticism reminiscent of Sontag’s Illness as Metaphor with the mordant humor of Christopher Hitchens’s recent reports on his battle with the Big C. It’s a philosophical inquiry into the existential black comedy of being a patient—Burton’s Melancholy of Anatomy , reimagined as an episode of the cynical medical drama House.

It’s also one of the best things I’ve ever written—a closely observed, unsparingly honest, emotionally raw self-anatomization that manages, even so, to be philosophically probing, I think.

You can find out more about the conference and its schedule by clicking here.

Image: The Anatomy lesson of Dr Frederik Ruysch, Jan van Neck (lifted from Wikimedia Commons).

Source:
http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Morbid Anatomy Library on Fox News. Yes, Really.

Posted: October 30, 2011 at 3:52 pm


A few weeks ago, Fox News (yes, THAT Fox News) sent over Red Eye host Bill Schulz and former medical examiner of New York Dr. Michael M. Baden for a little filmed visit to the Morbid Anatomy Library. In the course of our time together, we talked about phrenology, body snatching, and mummification. In addition, the very knowledgeable Dr. Baden conducted a thorough and pretty fascinating forensic examination of the newest addition to the library: an early 20th century human skeleton medical preparation, seen in the screen shot above.

You learn all about the skeleton--and watch the segment in its entirety--by clicking here.

Source:
http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith

Exhibition: "Mechanical Wonders: The Sandoz Collection," Through November 26, 2011

Posted: October 30, 2011 at 3:52 pm


This exhibit looks truly amazing! Many of the objects, I am told, come only very rarely to The United States, so make sure to take advantage of this opportunity while you can! I will absolutely be making a personal pilgrimage.

"Mechanical Wonders: The Sandoz Collection"
Presented by A La Vieille Russie and Parmigiani
October 26 – November 26, 2011

Visit ALVR this Fall to see a very special loan exhibition of intricate marvels that jump, sing and act as you never believed jeweled creations could.

Featuring early 19th century Swiss gold and enamel automaton snuff boxes, watches, magicians, and animals, the Imperial Swan Egg of 1906 and the Imperial Peacock Egg of 1908 by Fabergé, as well as contemporary interpretations by Parmigiani Fleurier of watches in the Sandoz Collection. In addition, the catalogue raisonné of the collection will be presented for the first time.

EXHIBITION HOURS (beginning October 26):
Monday through Friday 11am-6pm
Thursday 11am-7pm
Saturday 12pm-5pm
Closed for Thanksgiving Day.

Address: 781 Fifth Avenue at 59th Street
New York, NY 10022
212-752-1727
http://www.alvr.com

You can find out more and purchase tickets by clicking here. Thanks so much to the inspiring Jere Ryder for alerting me to this exhibition!

Source:
http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Recommendation and review posted by G. Smith


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