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Nanotechnology – The New York Times

Posted: July 8, 2016 at 7:13 am

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The finding may be the key to once again increasing the speed of computer processors, which has been stalled for the last decade.

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A consortium of which the company is a part has made working versions of ultradense seven-nanometer chips, capable of holding much more information than existing chips.

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A new technique makes minute biological features, some just 70 nanometers wide, more visible through regular optical microscopes.

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Submicroscopic particles of gold and silver create unusual optical effects.

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Ben Jensen, a British scientist, explains why his companys new invention, Vantablack, may not work in your home. Not even on an accent wall.

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Researchers say they have developed an electrical conductor that is highly flexible and transparent, a combination that could help usher in flexible flat-screen televisions and smartphones.

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Scientists are looking for new ways to make computer chips and investigating materials that can self-assemble.

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The achievement was reported in the journal Nature on Wednesday. Carbon nanotubes are viewed as having the potential to extend the limits of silicon.

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Researchers using nanoparticles of gold have been able to stop blood in test tubes from clotting, and then make it clot again.

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Dr. Rohrer helped invent the scanning tunneling microscope, which made it possible to see individual atoms and move them around.

By DOUGLAS MARTIN

Carbon nanotubes may prove to be the material of the future when todays silicon-based chips reach their fundamental physical limits.

The group As You Sow said nanoparticles, the size of molecules, have been found in the blood stream after ingestion and inhalation.

A new wave of imaging technologies, driven by the falling cost of computing, is transforming the way doctors can examine patients.

Scientists have made a vibrating bridgelike device millionths of a meter long that changes frequency when a molecule arrives; the change is measured to determine the molecules mass.

Nicknamed the Queen of Carbon, Mildred Spiewak Dresselhaus studies the fundamental properties of carbon, as insulator one moment, superconductor the next.

The work of the winning scientists spanned the outer reaches of the solar system and penetrated the inner workings of brain circuits and nanotubes.

Industries based on nanotechnology are a rapidly growing niche in the economy of the Czech Republic, which, although small, is widely respected for its technical prowess.

A National Academy of Sciences committee called for further study of the minuscule substances, which are found in products from makeup to paint and drive a $225 billion market.

Findings from research conducted at I.B.M., being reported Thursday in the journal Science, could lead to a new class of more powerful and efficient nanomaterials.

Alain Kaloyeros, president of the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, resigned from the boards of two groups that seek to revive upstate cities.

By JESSE McKINLEY

The finding may be the key to once again increasing the speed of computer processors, which has been stalled for the last decade.

By JOHN MARKOFF

A consortium of which the company is a part has made working versions of ultradense seven-nanometer chips, capable of holding much more information than existing chips.

By JOHN MARKOFF

A new technique makes minute biological features, some just 70 nanometers wide, more visible through regular optical microscopes.

By JOHN MARKOFF

Submicroscopic particles of gold and silver create unusual optical effects.

By CATHERINE CHAPMAN

Ben Jensen, a British scientist, explains why his companys new invention, Vantablack, may not work in your home. Not even on an accent wall.

By LINDA LEE

Researchers say they have developed an electrical conductor that is highly flexible and transparent, a combination that could help usher in flexible flat-screen televisions and smartphones.

By DOUGLAS QUENQUA

Scientists are looking for new ways to make computer chips and investigating materials that can self-assemble.

By JOHN MARKOFF

The achievement was reported in the journal Nature on Wednesday. Carbon nanotubes are viewed as having the potential to extend the limits of silicon.

By JOHN MARKOFF

Researchers using nanoparticles of gold have been able to stop blood in test tubes from clotting, and then make it clot again.

By SINDYA N. BHANOO

Dr. Rohrer helped invent the scanning tunneling microscope, which made it possible to see individual atoms and move them around.

By DOUGLAS MARTIN

Carbon nanotubes may prove to be the material of the future when todays silicon-based chips reach their fundamental physical limits.

The group As You Sow said nanoparticles, the size of molecules, have been found in the blood stream after ingestion and inhalation.

A new wave of imaging technologies, driven by the falling cost of computing, is transforming the way doctors can examine patients.

Scientists have made a vibrating bridgelike device millionths of a meter long that changes frequency when a molecule arrives; the change is measured to determine the molecules mass.

Nicknamed the Queen of Carbon, Mildred Spiewak Dresselhaus studies the fundamental properties of carbon, as insulator one moment, superconductor the next.

The work of the winning scientists spanned the outer reaches of the solar system and penetrated the inner workings of brain circuits and nanotubes.

Industries based on nanotechnology are a rapidly growing niche in the economy of the Czech Republic, which, although small, is widely respected for its technical prowess.

A National Academy of Sciences committee called for further study of the minuscule substances, which are found in products from makeup to paint and drive a $225 billion market.

Findings from research conducted at I.B.M., being reported Thursday in the journal Science, could lead to a new class of more powerful and efficient nanomaterials.

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Nanotechnology – The New York Times

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