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Chemistry | Middle Tennessee State University

Posted: November 13, 2018 at 3:42 pm

To study chemistry is to prepare for any number of careers, many of which do not necessarily involve lab coats and flasks. Examples include

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

Undergraduate students may pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with a major in Chemistry or with a concentration in Professional Chemistry. Other departmental majors leading to a B.S. include Biochemistry, Science, and Health Science, under which numerous pre-professional programs are coordinated. Undergraduate and graduate minors in Chemistry are available.The department is one of the participants in Forensic Science, an interdisciplinary major leading to a B.S.

Graduate study includes a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Chemistry.

Chemistry

Department of Chemistry615-898-2954Norma Dunlap, program [email protected]

The Chemistry program includes traditional areas-analytical, biochemistry, organic, inorganic, and physical-as well as computational, polymer, medicinal, and environmental chemistry.

NOTE: Students who wish to get jobs as chemists are strongly encouraged to take additional upper-division courses (especially CHEM 4230/CHEM 4231), follow the plan for the professional major, or take more advanced chemistry courses upon graduation.

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Chemistry, B.S., Academic Map

General Educationrequirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are recommended for this major:

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1110

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1120

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121with minimum grade of C- (or equivalent course). Corequisite: CHEM 2231. Gravimetric, volumetric, optical, and electrochemical analysis with examples from clinical chemistry, water pollution chemistry, occupational health and safety, and industrial chemistry. Three hours lecture.

2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 1120or equivalent course. Corequisite: CHEM 2230recommended, but not required. Laboratory course in classical wet chemical analysis; two three-hour laboratory periods per week.

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 3010. Corequisite: CHEM 3021. A continuation of CHEM 3010. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1910and PHYS 2020/PHYS 2021.Corequisite: CHEM 4331. Basic study of physical chemistry including modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and related theoretical topics. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 4330/CHEM 4331. A continuation of CHEM 4330/CHEM 4331. Corequisite: CHEM 4341. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

OR

5 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 4330/CHEM 4331; MATH 1920. Corequisite: CHEM 4361. A molecular approach to traditional physical chemistry. Concepts and theorems of classical thermodynamics revisited on the basis of quantum and statistical mechanics applied to simple molecular models. Necessary mathematical apparatus discussed in sufficient detail, but only at applied level. Laboratory session provides hands-on experience with quantum-chemistry computational software to predict thermochemical and spectroscopic properties of molecules. Three hours lecture and two three-hour laboratories. Offered every spring.

Chosen from:

1 credit hour

Prerequisite:CHEM 2030 orCHEM 3010. Communicating science, taking standardized tests, applying for graduate/professional school or a job, using library and online resources, and other professional skills. Capstone course. One-hour lecture. Offered each spring.

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031orCHEM 3010/CHEM 3011.Corequisite: CHEM 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three-hour lecture and one three-hour lab.Does not count toward Biochemistry major.

OR

3 credit hours

Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021; not open to those who have had CHEM 3530/CHEM 3531. Chemical properties of biological molecules such as amino acids, proteins, enzymes, and carbohydrates. Chemical basis of enzyme catalysis and reactions of carbohydrate metabolism. Three hours lecture per week.

1 to 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; CHEM 2230 recommended. Student research allied with the instructor's research or designed specifically for the particular student. Minimum of three clock-hours work per week required for each credit hour. Summary report or some other form of presentation required. A total of no more than four hours of research credits may be counted toward a major in chemistry. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.

1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Successful completion of target courses and permission of instructor. A course to refine thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory chemistry laboratory. Course credits will count toward a major in General Science and one hour will count toward a major in Chemistry. May be repeated for a total of three credits.

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011 and CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021 or CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 with permission of instructor. Drug design and development including structural changes involved in making drug analogs. Drug interaction with macromolecular targets including receptors, enzymes, and DNA. Various classes of drugs and their mechanisms for the treatment of specific therapeutic areas.

3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021. Theory of and practice in the interpretation of mass, infrared, Raman, ultraviolet-visible, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Three hours lecture.

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1120 or equivalent; CHEM 2030 or CHEM 3010 recommended. The basic concepts and theories of inorganic chemistry and how these are used to predict and understand the physical and chemical properties of compounds of the elements other than carbon. Inorganic compounds in the air, water, earth, and in the laboratory and in biochemistry, geochemistry, and industrial materials and processes.

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3010andCHEM 4400 required;CHEM 3020 recommended; co-registration in CHEM 4360/CHEM 4361 recommended. In-depth study of atomic theory for chemical periodicy; symmetry and group theory; molecular orbital theory; chemistry of metals, nonmetals, and organometallic compounds. Not open to students who have taken or are taking CHEM 4410. Offered alternate spring semesters.

3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 4500. Structure and metabolism of lipids, amino acids, nucleotides, and nucleic acids at the molecular level. Emphasis on chemistry of metabolic reactions. Three hours lecture per week.

2 credit hours

Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 4500 or consent of instructor. Laboratory in biochemical techniques with emphasis on protein purification, enzyme kinetics, carbohydrate and lipid analysis, and manipulation of DNA. Six hours of laboratory per week.

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121and 8 hours of BIOL and/or CHEM beyond the freshman level.Introduces major environmental issues including climate change,water quality, air pollution, landfills, hazardous wastes, fossil fuels, andalternative energy. The quality ofenvironment and thechanges in the environment due to contamination explored. Three hours lecture.

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121, CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011, 8 hours of upper-division biology or chemistry, andjunior or senior standing.Fundamental chemical principles applied to the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants in soil-water environments. Important toxins explored and their movement and occurrence in ecosystems explained based on chemical and physical parameters. Topics will include pesticides, dioxin, mercury, and bioaccumulation. Three hours lecture.

3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021; physical chemistry strongly recommended. Chemistry of polymers; their structure, properties, and applications. Three hours lecture.

2 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021; corequisites:CHEM 4700; CHEM 4330/CHEM 4331strongly recommended. Laboratory introduction to synthesis, kinetics, characterization, engineering, and applications of polymers and other modern materials.

4 credit hours

Prerequisites: 24 hours of ACS-approved chemistry courses. Student research allied with the instructor's research or designed specifically for the particular student. Minimum of twelve (12) hours a week. Student must write a formal report which is approved by the instructor to receive credit for this course.

4 credit hours

(Same asFSCH 4230.) Prerequisite: CHEM 2230/CHEM 2231,orCHEM 4550/CHEM 4551.Corequisite: CHEM 4231. Potentiometric titration, polarographic, coulometric, gas chromatographic, ultraviolet, visible and infrared absorption, and atomic absorption techniques of analysis. Requirements and limitations of each technique for obtaining quantitative measurements; applications to various chemical systems from both theoretical and experimental standpoints. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A problem from chemistry, physics, or other physical science appropriate to the student's background and interest. A formal written report must be submitted and approved by the instructor to receive credit for this course.

NOTE: Electives must be taken at MTSU.

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1730

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1730with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1910

4 credit hours

Prerequisite:BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1120

0 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2010

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2011

0 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2020

4 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2021

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

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Chemistry | Middle Tennessee State University

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