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Late-Breaking Study Results of the Supreme HT Healing-Targeted DES Demonstrated Equivalent Outcomes with Exceptional Safety – PRNewswire

The PIONEER III study enrolled 1,629 patients (randomized 2:1 experimental to control) from North America, Europe and Japan and had a primary composite endpoint of target lesion failure (TLF) at one-year. The TLF outcomes showed that the Supreme HT met the non-inferiority endpoint at 5.4% compared to 5.1% from the DP DES (p=0.002). A grouped analysis of secondary endpoints showed a numerically better result for Supreme HT in cardiac death or target-vessel myocardial infarction (TV MI) with 3.5% in the Supreme HT arm compared to 4.6% in the control arm (p=0.27). Lower late stent thrombosis data (Supreme HT 0.1% compared to DP DES 0.4%, p=0.22) also suggested exceptional safety for the HT DES. A powered, landmark TLF analysis evaluating the healing superiority of Supreme HT between 1 and 5 years is ongoing.

"I am very pleased that Japanese patients will benefit from the most advanced DES in the US, Europe and Japan," said Shigeru Saito, MD, Shonan Kamakura General, Japan and primary investigator of the Japanese cohort of the PIONEER III study . "The results combined with the safety measurement of cardiac death, target vessel MI and late stent thrombosis favor the Supreme HT, supporting the early endothelial healing concept."

Contemporary DES have emphasized delay healing through prolonged drug delivery to suppress the body's response to injury, hypersensitivity, or progression of disease. The Supreme HT development was based on the "wound-healing window" concept originally proposed in 2013 and represents a novel class of DES that highlight the importance of early, timely healing. Through patented designs and proprietary processes, the Supreme HT was tailored to help patients accelerate their wound-healing process and restore their natural endothelial function. This healing-targeted mechanism may help overcome the long-standing problem of tradition-DES implantation, allowing for safer long-term results.

"We are very grateful to the extraordinary group of medical professionals and all the patients who have endured through this difficult pandemic and completed this study milestone in such a timely and professional manor," saidJianhua Sun, PhD., Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of SINOMED."The results have been extremely encouraging and if we reach superiority in the landmark analysis, wecould revolutionize the understanding of healing and the future of implantable devices,"

More information on the PIONEER III study is available at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT03168776.

About SINOMED

Sino Medical Science Technology Inc. (SINOMED), a global medical device company engaged in research, development, production, and commercial distribution of interventional devices. We are focused on developing breakthrough technologies to target unmet clinical needs in the interventional treatment of coronary, neurovascular and structural heart disease. Our mission is to expose more patients to the benefits of our medical innovations, increasing patient longevity and quality of life.

For more information, visit: http://www.sinomed.com

SINOMED B.V Cindy Zheng T: +31 10 307 6295 E: [emailprotected]

Photo - https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1333951/SINOMED_Stent.jpg Logo - https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1333950/SINOMED_Logo.jpg

SOURCE SINOMED

http://www.sinomed.com/

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Late-Breaking Study Results of the Supreme HT Healing-Targeted DES Demonstrated Equivalent Outcomes with Exceptional Safety - PRNewswire

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Late-Breaking Study Results of the Supreme HT(TM) Healing-Targeted DES Demonstrated Equivalent Outco – PharmiWeb.com

TIANJIN, China, Nov. 17, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- SINOMED today announced that Prof. Alexandra Lansky from the Yale School of Medicine, USA, presented data from its first inter-continental PIONEER III study comparing the safety and efficacy of the Supreme HT (Healing-Targeted) Drug-Eluting Stent, to the Xience or Promus Durable Polymer Drug-Eluting Stent (DP DES). One-year results, revealed at the 2020 American Heart Association Scientific Late-Breaking Trials Session, showed equivalent clinical performance of the Supreme HT to the market-leading DES and will be used to support U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Japanese regulatory approvals.

The PIONEER III study enrolled 1,629 patients (randomized 2:1 experimental to control) from North America, Europe and Japan and had a primary composite endpoint of target lesion failure (TLF) at one-year. The TLF outcomes showed that the Supreme HT met the non-inferiority endpoint at 5.4% compared to 5.1% from the DP DES (p=0.002). A grouped analysis of secondary endpoints showed a numerically better result for Supreme HT in cardiac death or target-vessel myocardial infarction (TV MI) with 3.5% in the Supreme HT arm compared to 4.6% in the control arm (p=0.27). Lower late stent thrombosis data (Supreme HT 0.1% compared to DP DES 0.4%, p=0.22) also suggested exceptional safety for the HT DES. A powered, landmark TLF analysis evaluating the healing superiority of Supreme HT between 1 and 5 years is ongoing.

"I am very pleased that Japanese patients will benefit from the most advanced DES in the US, Europe and Japan," said Shigeru Saito, MD, Shonan Kamakura General, Japan and primary investigator of the Japanese cohort of the PIONEER III study . "The results combined with the safety measurement of cardiac death, target vessel MI and late stent thrombosis favor the Supreme HT, supporting the early endothelial healing concept."

Contemporary DES have emphasized delay healing through prolonged drug delivery to suppress the body's response to injury, hypersensitivity, or progression of disease. The Supreme HT development was based on the "wound-healing window" concept originally proposed in 2013 and represents a novel class of DES that highlight the importance of early, timely healing. Through patented designs and proprietary processes, the Supreme HT was tailored to help patients accelerate their wound-healing process and restore their natural endothelial function. This healing-targeted mechanism may help overcome the long-standing problem of tradition-DES implantation, allowing for safer long-term results.

"We are very grateful to the extraordinary group of medical professionals and all the patients who have endured through this difficult pandemic and completed this study milestone in such a timely and professional manor," saidJianhua Sun, PhD., Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of SINOMED."The results have been extremely encouraging and if we reach superiority in the landmark analysis, wecould revolutionize the understanding of healing and the future of implantable devices,"

More information on the PIONEER III study is available at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT03168776.

About SINOMED

Sino Medical Science Technology Inc. (SINOMED), a global medical device company engaged in research, development, production, and commercial distribution of interventional devices. We are focused on developing breakthrough technologies to target unmet clinical needs in the interventional treatment of coronary, neurovascular and structural heart disease. Our mission is to expose more patients to the benefits of our medical innovations, increasing patient longevity and quality of life.

For more information, visit: http://www.sinomed.com

SINOMED B.V Cindy Zheng T: +31 10 307 6295 E: cindy.zheng@sinomed.com

Photo - https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1333951/SINOMED_Stent.jpg Logo - https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1333950/SINOMED_Logo.jpg

SOURCE SINOMED

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Late-Breaking Study Results of the Supreme HT(TM) Healing-Targeted DES Demonstrated Equivalent Outco - PharmiWeb.com

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Longevity and Anti-senescence Therapy Market | Business Outlook with COVID-19 Scenario – TechnoWeekly

Latest added Longevity and Anti-senescence Therapy Market research report by Report Ocean offers detailed product outlook and elaborates market review till 2026. The market Study is segmented by key regions that is accelerating the marketization The study is a perfect mix of qualitative and quantitative Market data collected and validated majorly through primary data and secondary sources.

This report studies the Longevity and Anti-senescence Therapy Market size, industry status and forecast, competition landscape and growth opportunity. This research report categorizes the Longevity and Anti-senescence Therapy Market by companies, region, type and end-use industry.

Covid-19 Impact Update COVID-19 Outbreak Longevity and Anti-senescence Therapy Market Research

Research Analysts at Report Ocean constantly monitor the industry impacts of current events in real-time here is an update of how this industry is likely to be impacted as a result of the global COVID-19 pandemic:

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Acorda TherapeuticsUnity BiotechnologyAntoxereneCelgeneCohbarSenex BiotechnologyHuman Longevity Inc.T.A. SciencesAgex TherapeuticsRecursion PharmaceuticalsCalico Life SciencesSpotlight BiosciencePowervision Inc.Sierra Sciences LlcRestorbioInsilico MedicineOisin BiotechnologySenolytic TherapeuticsProteostasis Therapeutics Inc.Prana Biotechnology Ltd.Cleara Biotech

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Europe (Germany, UK, France, Spain, Italy, Russia, Rest of Europe; Rest of Europe is further segmented into Belgium, Denmark, Austria, Norway, Sweden, The Netherlands, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and Romania)

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Longevity and Anti-senescence Therapy Market | Business Outlook with COVID-19 Scenario - TechnoWeekly

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Study: Loneliness highest in the 20s and lowest in the 60s – University of California

Loneliness is a prevalent and serious public health problem impacting health, well-being and longevity. Seeking to develop effective interventions, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine examined the psychological and environmental factors that lead to patterns of loneliness in different age groups.

Researchers used a web-based survey of 2,843 participants, ages 20 to 69 years, from across the United States.

The study, published in the November 10, 2020 online edition of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, found that levels of loneliness were highest in the 20s and lowest in the 60s, with another peak in the mid-40s.

What we found was a range of predictors of loneliness across the lifespan, said corresponding senior author Dilip V. Jeste, M.D., senior associate dean for Healthy Aging and Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

The researchers noted that lower levels of empathy and compassion, smaller social networks, not having a spouse or a partner and greater sleep disturbances were consistent predictors of loneliness across all decades. Lower social self-efficacy or the ability to reflect confidence in exerting control over ones own motivation, behavior and social environment and higher anxiety were associated with worse loneliness in all age decades, except the 60s.

Loneliness was also associated with a lower level of decisiveness in the 50s.

The study confirmed previous reports of a strong inverse association between loneliness and wisdom, especially the pro-social behaviors component (empathy and compassion).

Compassion seems to reduce the level of loneliness at all ages, probably by enabling individuals to accurately perceive and interpret others emotions along with helpful behavior toward others, and thereby increasing their own social self-efficacy and social networks, said Jeste.

The survey suggested that people in their 20s were dealing with high stress and pressure while trying to establish a career and find a life partner.

A lot of people in this decade are also constantly comparing themselves on social media and are concerned about how many likes and followers they have, said Tanya Nguyen, Ph.D., first author of the study and assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Diego School of Medicine. The lower level of self-efficacy may lead to greater loneliness.

People in their 40s start to experience physical challenges and health issues, such as high blood pressure and diabetes.

Individuals may start to lose loved ones close to them and their children are growing up and are becoming more independent. This greatly impacts self-purpose and may cause a shift in self-identify, resulting in increased loneliness, said Nguyen.

Jeste said the findings are especially relevant during the COVID-19 global pandemic.

We want to understand what strategies may be effective in reducing loneliness during this challenging time, said Jeste. Loneliness is worsened by the physical distancing that is necessary to stop the spread of the pandemic.

Nguyen said intervention and prevention efforts should consider stage-of-life issues. There is a need for a personalized and nuanced prioritizing of prevention targets in different groups of people, said Jeste.

Co-authors include: Ellen Lee, Rebecca Daly, Tsung-Chin Wu, Yi Tang, Xin Tu, Ryan Van Patten, and Barton Palmer, all at UC San Diego.

Funding for this study came, in part, from the National Institute of Health (grants K23 MH118435, K23 MH119375, T32 MH019934, and R01 MH094151); UC San Diego Center for Healthy Aging; and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Study: Loneliness highest in the 20s and lowest in the 60s - University of California

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3 Discoveries That Could Impact Diagnosis, Treatment of PTSD and Gulf War Illness – BU Today

Effective diagnosis still remains a barrier for many veterans who are coping with medical disorders as a result of active duty. But early diagnosis and intervention is critical to prevent an overall impact on health and longevity.

Boston University researchers on the Medical Campus are working with collaborators at the VA Boston Healthcare System and other universities to speed up diagnostic processesfor post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other lesser-known disorders like Gulf War Illnessand understand the underlying risks that could compound the effects of PTSD or other psychological disorders to accelerate the bodys biological aging process.

The Brink rounded up three recent studies that present promising findings for better identifying and understanding the health issues facing veterans.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects eight million adults in the United States, including hundreds of thousands of veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. But diagnosing PTSD is a time-consuming process, taking upwards of 30 minutesa barrier for the screening to be included in most routine clinical visits.

Now, researchers from the BU School of Public Health and the VA Boston Healthcare System say machine learning could help streamline and speed up PTSD diagnosis in veterans. Published in the journal Assessment, their recent study utilized machine learning to find that out of the 20 gold standard PTSD screening questions from the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (SCID-5), 6 questions could be cut out because only 14 of them were required to accurately identify PTSD in veterans with 90 percent accuracy.

The researchers made the discovery using data from SCID-5 assessments of 1,265 veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts, and a kind of machine learning system called random forests (made up of forests of decision trees). The random forests system learned how strongly different items in the diagnostic questionnaire predicted a PTSD diagnosis. This allowed the researchers to identify which questions had weak enough associations that they could be cut from the screening while still maintaining at least 90 percent accuracy.

The most important item for a diagnosis was detachment or estrangement from others. This was true both for the whole sample and for male and female veterans separately. However, they also found that certain questions tended to be more or less revealing of PTSD status depending on whether a veteran is male or female.

This study demonstrates very clearly that the most efficient manner of diagnosing PTSD may differ for men and women, says study senior author Brian Marx, staff psychologist at the National Center for PTSD at the VA Boston Healthcare System and a BU School of Medicine professor of psychiatry. This finding is especially critical in a setting like VA, which serves a small but growing number of women veterans.

And with the COVID-19 pandemic leading to more PTSD, depression, anxiety, substance use, and other disorders in the general population, the application of machine learning methods to streamline mental health assessments may help reduce the burden and help people receive care more efficiently, says study lead author Tammy Jiang, a BU SPH doctoral candidate in epidemiology, and help people receive care more efficiently.

Researchers led by BU psychiatrist Erika Wolf are on a mission to find out the consequences that PTSD has on veterans physical health. A lot of individuals will develop early onset age-related conditions, like metabolic diseases, Alzheimers cardiac disease, a whole host of changes can occur. We wondered if acceleration of aging is at play, says Wolf, a clinical research psychologist for the National Center for PTSD at VA Boston Healthcare System and a MED associate professor of psychiatry.

Using data from individuals who donated their brains to the VAs National PTSD Brain Bank, the researchers examined how genetic variation and PTSD status interacted with each other. They found that older adults with PTSD showed evidence of accelerated aging in their brain tissue if they had a certain at-risk variant of a gene known as klotho, which is associated with longevity. Their results were published online in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. The findings may also help explain why chronic stress negatively impacts the biological age of individuals with other psychological disorders.

We know that PTSD doesnt exist in a vacuum, that it has similar types of effects as other stress disorders, Wolf says, which could include people who have generalized anxiety disorder, depression, substance abuse, antisocial personality disorder, and more. Its about the idea that this gene variant is impacting the relationship between PTSDor other forms of psychological stressand aging.

Having the at-risk variant of the klotho gene could be important clinical knowledge for healthcare providers to be aware of for any patients that are experiencing high stress, trouble sleeping, high anxiety levels, and intrusive memories. The gene variant can be detected by blood, although genotyping hasnt yet become mainstream in psychiatric care, Wolf says. But she looks to the progression of cancer treatment, where most patients undergo genetic sequencing to determine the best course of treatment, and is hopeful that the trend will soon catch on in other areas of medicine.

Wolf and her team are now exploring whether the expression of the at-risk klotho gene can be moderated through exercise, cholesterol medication, or other factors.

Researchers and Gulf War veterans have fought for decades for recognition of Gulf War illness (GWI), whose patients experience debilitating symptoms, including memory impairment, chronic pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal issues, and earlier onset of age-related chronic diseases.

Right now, Gulf War illness is diagnosed by self-report of health symptoms, says Kimberly Sullivan (MED99), a BU SPH research associate professor of environmental health, and Gulf War veterans have struggled to have their symptoms taken seriously as a unique disorder and not treated as chronic symptoms found after other wars or of those encountered as part of other similar chronic multi-symptom disorders.

But a new study led by Sullivan could potentially change that. She and collaborators found that central nervous system proteins in the blood could objectively diagnose GWI. Their findings were published in Brain Sciences.

The research team, led by Sullivan and Mohamed Abou Donia, professor of pharmacology and cancer biology and of neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine, compared blood samples from 171 veterans with GWI, 60 healthy Gulf War veterans, and 85 civilians with similar chronic medical conditions (50 with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and 35 with irritable bowel syndrome).

Compared to the other groups, the study participants with GWI had significantly higher levels of 9 out of the 10 kinds of central nervous system proteins measured in the study, distinguishing them from both healthy Gulf War veterans and from civilians with these similar medical conditions.

This brings us one large step closer to having a simple blood test to diagnose the disorder and to differentiate it from other chronic medical disorders, Sullivan says.

Past studies by Sullivan and other GWI researchers indicate that the GWI symptoms are caused by brain inflammation caused by exposure to the nerve agent sarin, pyridostigmine bromide pills that were meant to protect against sarin gas, and the pesticides meant to protect soldiers against insect-borne illnesses.

An objective biomarker for GWI, such as one that can be identified from a blood sample, will make it much easier for veterans with the disorderan estimated 250,000, or one-third of those who served in the Gulf Warto receive benefits and treatment at their local VA hospitals, Sullivan says.

The new study also supports previous research indicating that brain alterations caused by toxin exposure are the cause of GWIs physical symptoms. These proteins should not be in the blood if [soldiers] did not at least at some point have damage to the central nervous system and changes to the blood-brain barrier, Sullivan says.

This research was supported by the Department of Defense, the Department of Health & Human Services, the National Institute on Aging, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the National Center for PTSD, and the National Institute of Mental Health.

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Finding Your Place in The Medical Field – Michigan Medicine

Some people are born to be medical researchers like Ronald Koenig, M.D., Ph.D., an endocrinologist specializing in thyroid cancer at the University of Michigans Rogel Cancer Center. According to him, the excitement of diving into the unknown and potentially cracking the nut on a big, biological mystery is one of the medical fields greatest joys.

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To think about an unanswered medical question and then create a test to try and solve that, using my knowledge and experience, has been incredibly rewarding, he says.

Now, as he transitions into retirement after his 40-year career, Koenig reflects on his proudest medical discoveries, advice for new medical students and the future of thyroid cancer care.

I moved to Michigan in 1988, splitting my professional time between medical research and being a physician. Being in a lab, but also being able to develop relationships with patients has provided unique aspects of professional fulfillment that the other doesnt for me. It gave me balance in my career that Ive appreciated.

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Ive been drawn to the intellectual challenges of research since college. Often times, research can be frustrating, but the draw of solving a medical question yet to be solved is irresistible. The fact I can test a hypothesis because I find it interesting and important and take it wherever the data may lead that intellectual freedom is wonderful. Thats how science progresses.

On the other hand, I dont think Id be happy without patient care which is why Ill still do that part time at the Rogel Cancer Center. Its rewarding work. I get to see patients longitudinally, over years and years, and develop personal relationships with them.

The Medical Scientist Training Program is a combined M.D. and Ph.D. program consisting of 100 medical students. As director, I was in charge of defining the nature of program. I really enjoyed the relationship Id build with the students over the eight or nine years it takes to get both degrees and help prepare them for the field of academic medicine.

My own M.D. and Ph.D. training was critical in defining who Id become as a professional. The University of Michigan is an educational institution, and this program exists because the medical school recognizes its importance. Im grateful.

No career is perfect. Every career path has its pros and cons. Especially in medical research, there are times where you feel rejected or like you shouldve seen something and didnt. You have to learn how to adapt and move forward.

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