Search Immortality Topics:

Page 36«..1020..33343536

Category Archives: Hormone Replacement Therapy

Hormone replacement therapy and heart health: an update

It seems that every time one reads a recent article on estrogen replacement therapy, the risks and benefits have somewhat changed, recommendations have been altered, or new studies provide frankly surprisingly opposite conclusions compared with past ones. Hormone therapy (HT) used to be routinely prescribed for postmenopausal women to relieve hot flashes and other menopause symptoms. Hormone replacement therapy was also thought to reduce the risk of heart disease. Does it? Before menopause, women have a lower risk of heart disease than men do. But as women age, their risk of heart disease increases due to decreasing estrogen levels. About twenty years ago, we used to advise older women to take estrogen and other hormones to keep their hearts healthy. However, hormone therapy has had mixed results in this regard. Many of the hoped-for benefits failed to materialize for large numbers of women. The largest randomized, controlled trial to date actually found an insignificant increase in heart disease in postmenopausal women using hormone therapy. Still, some data suggest that estrogen may decrease the risk of heart disease when taken early in postmenopausal years. In a Danish study, after 10 years of treatment, women receiving HT early after menopause had a significantly reduced risk of mortality and heart disease symptoms, without any apparent increase in risk of cancer or stroke. Another clinical trial, the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS), exploring estrogen use and heart disease in younger postmenopausal women was recently completed, with results expected soon. If you are having symptoms of menopause but are concerned about how hormone therapy will affect your heart, talk with your physician to put your personal risk into perspective. The risk of heart disease to an individual woman taking hormone therapy is actually very low. If you are in early menopause and have hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms, and are otherwise healthy, the benefits of hormone therapy likely outweigh any potential risks of heart disease. Your personal risk of heart disease depends on many factors, including your family history, personal medical history and your lifestyle. If you're at low risk of heart disease, and your menopausal symptoms are significant, hormone therapy may be a reasonable consideration. Continue reading

Posted in Hormone Replacement Therapy | Comments Off on Hormone replacement therapy and heart health: an update

Findings Presented at ENDO 2013 Support Therapeutic Potential of Natpara® as Parathyroid Hormone Replacement Therapy …

BEDMINSTER, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NPSP), a biopharmaceutical company pioneering and delivering therapies that transform the lives of patients with rare diseases worldwide, yesterday presented findings supporting the therapeutic potential of Natpara (recombinant full-length human parathyroid hormone or rhPTH [1-84]) in poster sessions at ENDO 2013, The Endocrine Societys 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco, CA. Natpara is a bioengineered replica of human parathyroid hormone that is being developed by NPS for adults with hypoparathyroidism, a rare and complex endocrine disorder that is characterized by insufficient levels of parathyroid hormone, the bodys principal regulator of calcium and phosphorus. These findings suggest Natpara may provide an important new treatment option for patients with hypoparathyroidism by improving the calcium and phosphorus mineral imbalance associated with this complex disorder while significantly reducing the dependence on calcium and vitamin D supplementation, said Roger Garceau, MD, executive vice president and chief medical officer of NPS Pharmaceuticals. Our growing collection of clinical data for Natpara supports its therapeutic potential as the first replacement therapy targeting the underlying cause of adult hypoparathyroidism and we look forward to filing our U.S. Biologic License Application later this year. Hypoparathyroidism is the only classic endocrine disorder without an FDA-approved replacement therapy. Current treatment approaches focus on symptom management through high doses of calcium and active vitamin D, which can lead to serious side effects and long-term consequences. Treatment with Natpara resulted in maintained serum active vitamin D levels despite a significant reduction in active vitamin D requirements. In a poster presentation on Sunday, June 16, lead study investigator Dolores M. Shoback, M.D., Professor in Residence at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, presented results analyzing the effects of Natpara on vitamin D metabolism in patients with hypoparathyroidism in two clinical trials, a Phase 1 study and REPLACE, a Phase 3 registration study. The results indicate that Natpara treatment maintains serum levels of active vitamin D in the normal range despite a significant reduction in active vitamin D requirements, while maintaining serum calcium at or near baseline, and reducing 24-hour urinary calcium in patients deficient in endogenous PTH secretion. All patients enrolled were prescribed calcium and active vitamin D supplements (calcitriol or 1 alpha calcifediol). In the Phase 1 study, patients received two doses of Natpara (50 and 100 g), separated by a washout period of seven days or more. In the Phase 1 study, serum active vitamin D increased to maximum baseline-adjusted level of 27.2 18.3 and 19.6 11.0 pg/ml with the 50-g and 100g doses of Natpara, respectively. 24-hour urine calcium excretion decreased by 13% and 23% with the 50- and 100g doses, respectively. Serum calcium levels showed maximum mean increases of 0.7 to 0.9 mg/dL 12 hours after the Natpara injection and remained above baseline levels after 24 hours with either dose. In REPLACE, 43% (36/84) patients treated with Natpara became independent of active vitamin D and reduced daily calcium to less than 500 mg/day versus 5% (2/37) patients in the placebo group by week 24 (P At week 24, mean urine calcium decreased by -74 190 mg/24 hours in the Natpara group and -84 169 mg/24 hours in the placebo group (P=0.06). In the placebo arm, reductions in urine calcium were mirrored by decreased total serum calcium levels. In contrast, total serum calcium remained above or near the baseline levels in Natpara-treated patients. Serum calcium levels were significantly higher in the Natpara group versus the placebo group at weeks 1-16 (P Continue reading

Posted in Hormone Replacement Therapy | Comments Off on Findings Presented at ENDO 2013 Support Therapeutic Potential of Natpara® as Parathyroid Hormone Replacement Therapy …

Women's health: Women in their 50s face changes, choices like hormone therapy

For women in their 50s, lower estrogen levels lead to menopause and a whole set of health concerns. "This is the beginning of the aging process," says Kate Beadle, a Kaiser Permanente nurse practitioner who specializes in menopause. Dr. Audrey Curtis, who's helping start a women's health clinic at Legacy Meridian Park, says: "A lot of women feel like they're on a roller coaster. Their hormone levels are doing what they did in the teenage years, really up and down." For some women, the answer is hormone replacement therapy to deal with symptoms of menopause. But the 50-year history of HRT has been as wild as the mood swings it is supposed to prevent. And the changing recommendations for women, as well as cancer fears, have led to confusion and stress. Introduced in the 1960s, long-term estrogen treatment was marketed as a wonder therapy to combat aging, disease and depression. Two 1975 studies indicating increased cancer risk made a temporary dent in sales, but it didn't last as other hormones like progestin were added to the therapy, supposedly eliminating the added cancer risk. In 2002, a major study by the federal Women's Health Initiative made a much bigger impression, linking estrogen-based treatment and elevated cancer risk. And estrogen was not a miracle drug that prevented certain chronic diseases, contrary to an earlier study. Since then, the Women's Health Initiative has been criticized for design flaws by medical researchers and other experts, and even its authors have backtracked on some of their warnings of elevated risk of heart disease. In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued a review of published research, including the Women's Health Initiative, and did not address the use of HRT to treat symptoms of menopause. However, it recommended against the use of HRT by post-menopausal women to prevent chronic disease. The task force concluded: Estrogen plus progestin and estrogen alone decreased risk for bone fractures. Continue reading

Posted in Hormone Replacement Therapy | Comments Off on Women's health: Women in their 50s face changes, choices like hormone therapy

Women’s health: Women in their 50s face changes, choices like hormone therapy

For women in their 50s, lower estrogen levels lead to menopause and a whole set of health concerns. "This is the beginning of the aging process," says Kate Beadle, a Kaiser Permanente nurse practitioner who specializes in menopause. Dr. Audrey Curtis, who's helping start a women's health clinic at Legacy Meridian Park, says: "A lot of women feel like they're on a roller coaster. Their hormone levels are doing what they did in the teenage years, really up and down." For some women, the answer is hormone replacement therapy to deal with symptoms of menopause. But the 50-year history of HRT has been as wild as the mood swings it is supposed to prevent. And the changing recommendations for women, as well as cancer fears, have led to confusion and stress. Introduced in the 1960s, long-term estrogen treatment was marketed as a wonder therapy to combat aging, disease and depression. Two 1975 studies indicating increased cancer risk made a temporary dent in sales, but it didn't last as other hormones like progestin were added to the therapy, supposedly eliminating the added cancer risk. In 2002, a major study by the federal Women's Health Initiative made a much bigger impression, linking estrogen-based treatment and elevated cancer risk. And estrogen was not a miracle drug that prevented certain chronic diseases, contrary to an earlier study. Since then, the Women's Health Initiative has been criticized for design flaws by medical researchers and other experts, and even its authors have backtracked on some of their warnings of elevated risk of heart disease. In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued a review of published research, including the Women's Health Initiative, and did not address the use of HRT to treat symptoms of menopause. However, it recommended against the use of HRT by post-menopausal women to prevent chronic disease. The task force concluded: Estrogen plus progestin and estrogen alone decreased risk for bone fractures. Continue reading

Posted in Hormone Replacement Therapy | Comments Off on Women’s health: Women in their 50s face changes, choices like hormone therapy