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Research To Advance Crop Resilience – Texas A&M Today – Texas A&M University Today

Junqi Song, Texas A&M AgriLife Research assistant professor.

Texas A&M AgriLife

A multi-institution, international study led byTexas A&M AgriLife Researchwill investigate how a process that triggers DNA repair in plants also plays a role in strengthening their disease immunity.

Understanding key functions of the process, which is well-studied in humans, will help scientists design better disease-control strategies for highly resilient food crops, said Junqi Song, AgriLife Research assistant professor of plant pathology in Dallas. Song leads the $1.1 millionNational Science Foundationgrant project alongsidePing He, Texas A&M University Presidential Impact Fellow and professor of biochemistry and biophysics, Bryan-College Station.

When invading pathogens infect plants, the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase attaches the molecule poly(ADP-ribose), or PAR, to certain proteins. This process is PARylation, and it activates a number of responses to pathogens, including DNA repair, immune responses and cell death, among others.

Ping He, Texas A&M Presidential Impact Fellow and professor of biochemistry and biophysics.

Texas A&M AgriLife

We are most interested in the link between DNA repair and immune responses, He said. We know a lot about how they function individually. But new evidence suggests that PARylation could be a mechanical link between them.

This is the crux of their research, and it is most likely applicable to all crop plants. Among crops, Song said, PARylation and plant immune response are genetically well conserved, or largely universal.

PARylation has been studied extensively in humans, due to its profound medical impact on many inflammatory and malignant disorders, namely cancer and related chemotherapy, he said.

But the function of PARylation in plants is poorly understood, Song said.

Over the next two years, Song and He along with collaborators at academic and research institutions across the globe aim to identify how PARylation targets immunity genes and proteins. By determining the intricately connected functions of DNA repair and immune responses, they will gain insight into how PARylation protects DNA from pathogen damage throughout an entire plant.

The work of this multilateral project will provide insights that can signal a big next step in resilient crop production that is sustainable into the future, Song said.

The work dovetails with AgriLife Researchs overarching push to meet demands of a changing climate, and to be able to grow crops sustainably in increasingly harsher conditions, especially in urban and suburban settings.

The push includes a new urban research center in Dallas. The center houses Songs lab and focuses on growing food in cities, preserving important water and land resources, as well as enhancing human health. Thegenomics program at the Dallas Center, led by Qingyi Yu, professor of plant genomics, is also collaborating on the PARylation research project.

Other collaborators are the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, The University of Wisconsin-Madison and researchers from a number of national and international academic and scientific research institutions.

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Biochemical Pesticides Market Progresses for Huge Profits by 2027 with demanding Key Players like Certis USA, BASF, Bayer, Isagro, Marrone Bio…

Overview Of Biochemical Pesticides Industry 2020-2027:

This has brought along several changes in This report also covers the impact of COVID-19 on the global market.

The Biochemical Pesticides Market analysis summary by Reports Insights is a thorough study of the current trends leading to this vertical trend in various regions. Research summarizes important details related to market share, market size, applications, statistics and sales. In addition, this study emphasizes thorough competition analysis on market prospects, especially growth strategies that market experts claim.

Biochemical Pesticides Market competition by top manufacturers as follow: , Valent BioSciences, Certis USA, BASF, Bayer, Isagro, Marrone Bio Innovations, Neudorff, Bioworks, Koppert

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The global Biochemical Pesticides market has been segmented on the basis of technology, product type, application, distribution channel, end-user, and industry vertical, along with the geography, delivering valuable insights.

The Type Coverage in the Market are: LiquidPowder

Market Segment by Applications, covers:Insect ControlWeed ControlPlant Disease ControlOthers

Market segment by Regions/Countries, this report coversNorth AmericaEuropeChinaRest of Asia PacificCentral & South AmericaMiddle East & Africa

Major factors covered in the report:

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Biochemical Pesticides Market Progresses for Huge Profits by 2027 with demanding Key Players like Certis USA, BASF, Bayer, Isagro, Marrone Bio...

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Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market 2020- Analysis And In-Depth Research On Market Size, Trends, Emerging Growth Factors And Forecast To 2026 |…

Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Research Report

LOS ANGELES, United States: The report is an all-inclusive research study of the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market taking into account the growth factors, recent trends, developments, opportunities, and competitive landscape. The market analysts and researchers have done extensive analysis of the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market with the help of research methodologies such as PESTLE and Porters Five Forces analysis. They have provided accurate and reliable market data and useful recommendations with an aim to help the players gain an insight into the overall present and future market scenario. The Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) report comprises in-depth study of the potential segments including product type, application, and end user and their contribution to the overall market size.

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In addition, market revenues based on region and country are provided in the Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) report. The authors of the report have also shed light on the common business tactics adopted by players. The leading players of the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market and their complete profiles are included in the report. Besides that, investment opportunities, recommendations, and trends that are trending at present in the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market are mapped by the report. With the help of this report, the key players of the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market will be able to make sound decisions and plan their strategies accordingly to stay ahead of the curve.

Competitive landscape is a critical aspect every key player needs to be familiar with. The report throws light on the competitive scenario of the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market to know the competition at both the domestic and global levels. Market experts have also offered the outline of every leading player of the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market, considering the key aspects such as areas of operation, production, and product portfolio. Additionally, companies in the report are studied based on the key factors such as company size, market share, market growth, revenue, production volume, and profits.

Key Players Mentioned in the Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Research Report: Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd, Hangzhou Hairui Chemical Co., Ltd., Hanke Chemical, Qingdao Kehai Bio

Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Segmentation by Product: 96% Ester Content>96% Ester Content

Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Segmentation by Application: Organic SynthesisPlasticizerOther

The Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market report has been segregated based on distinct categories, such as product type, application, end user, and region. Each and every segment is evaluated on the basis of CAGR, share, and growth potential. In the regional analysis, the report highlights the prospective region, which is estimated to generate opportunities in the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market in the forthcoming years. This segmental analysis will surely turn out to be a useful tool for the readers, stakeholders, and market participants to get a complete picture of the global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) market and its potential to grow in the years to come.

Key questions answered in the report:

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Table of Contents:

1 Study Coverage1.1 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Product Introduction1.2 Market Segments1.3 Key Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Manufacturers Covered: Ranking by Revenue1.4 Market by Type1.4.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Growth Rate by Type1.4.2 96% Ester Content1.4.3 >96% Ester Content1.5 Market by Application1.5.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Growth Rate by Application1.5.2 Organic Synthesis1.5.3 Plasticizer1.5.4 Other1.6 Study Objectives1.7 Years Considered

2 Executive Summary2.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size, Estimates and Forecasts2.1.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue 2015-20262.1.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales 2015-20262.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4), Market Size by Producing Regions: 2015 VS 2020 VS 20262.2.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Retrospective Market Scenario in Sales by Region: 2015-20202.2.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Retrospective Market Scenario in Revenue by Region: 2015-2020

3 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Competitor Landscape by Players3.1 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Manufacturers3.1.1 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Manufacturers (2015-2020)3.1.2 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Market Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)3.2 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Manufacturers3.2.1 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Manufacturers (2015-2020)3.2.2 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)3.2.3 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Concentration Ratio (CR5 and HHI) (2015-2020)3.2.4 Global Top 10 and Top 5 Companies by Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue in 20193.2.5 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)3.3 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Price by Manufacturers3.4 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Manufacturing Base Distribution, Product Types3.4.1 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Manufacturers Manufacturing Base Distribution, Headquarters3.4.2 Manufacturers Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Product Type3.4.3 Date of International Manufacturers Enter into Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market3.5 Manufacturers Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans

4 Market Size by Type (2015-2026)4.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size by Type (2015-2020)4.1.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Type (2015-2020)4.1.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Type (2015-2020)4.1.3 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Average Selling Price (ASP) by Type (2015-2026)4.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast by Type (2021-2026)4.2.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast by Type (2021-2026)4.2.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast by Type (2021-2026)4.2.3 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Average Selling Price (ASP) Forecast by Type (2021-2026)4.3 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Share by Price Tier (2015-2020): Low-End, Mid-Range and High-End

5 Market Size by Application (2015-2026)5.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size by Application (2015-2020)5.1.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Application (2015-2020)5.1.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Application (2015-2020)5.1.3 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Price by Application (2015-2020)5.2 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast by Application (2021-2026)5.2.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast by Application (2021-2026)5.2.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast by Application (2021-2026)5.2.3 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Price Forecast by Application (2021-2026)

6 North America6.1 North America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) by Country6.1.1 North America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Country6.1.2 North America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Country6.1.3 U.S.6.1.4 Canada6.2 North America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Type6.3 North America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Application

7 Europe7.1 Europe Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) by Country7.1.1 Europe Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Country7.1.2 Europe Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Country7.1.3 Germany7.1.4 France7.1.5 U.K.7.1.6 Italy7.1.7 Russia7.2 Europe Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Type7.3 Europe Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Application

8 Asia Pacific8.1 Asia Pacific Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) by Region8.1.1 Asia Pacific Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Region8.1.2 Asia Pacific Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Region8.1.3 China8.1.4 Japan8.1.5 South Korea8.1.6 India8.1.7 Australia8.1.8 Taiwan8.1.9 Indonesia8.1.10 Thailand8.1.11 Malaysia8.1.12 Philippines8.1.13 Vietnam8.2 Asia Pacific Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Type8.3 Asia Pacific Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Application

9 Latin America9.1 Latin America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) by Country9.1.1 Latin America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Country9.1.2 Latin America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Country9.1.3 Mexico9.1.4 Brazil9.1.5 Argentina9.2 Central & South America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Type9.3 Central & South America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Application

10 Middle East and Africa10.1 Middle East and Africa Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) by Country10.1.1 Middle East and Africa Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales by Country10.1.2 Middle East and Africa Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue by Country10.1.3 Turkey10.1.4 Saudi Arabia10.1.5 U.A.E10.2 Middle East and Africa Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Type10.3 Middle East and Africa Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Facts & Figures by Application

11 Company Profiles11.1 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd11.1.1 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Corporation Information11.1.2 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Description and Business Overview11.1.3 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)11.1.4 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Products Offered11.1.5 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Related Developments11.2 Hangzhou Hairui Chemical Co., Ltd.11.2.1 Hangzhou Hairui Chemical Co., Ltd. Corporation Information11.2.2 Hangzhou Hairui Chemical Co., Ltd. Description and Business Overview11.2.3 Hangzhou Hairui Chemical Co., Ltd. Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)11.2.4 Hangzhou Hairui Chemical Co., Ltd. Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Products Offered11.2.5 Hangzhou Hairui Chemical Co., Ltd. Related Developments11.3 Hanke Chemical11.3.1 Hanke Chemical Corporation Information11.3.2 Hanke Chemical Description and Business Overview11.3.3 Hanke Chemical Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)11.3.4 Hanke Chemical Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Products Offered11.3.5 Hanke Chemical Related Developments11.4 Qingdao Kehai Bio11.4.1 Qingdao Kehai Bio Corporation Information11.4.2 Qingdao Kehai Bio Description and Business Overview11.4.3 Qingdao Kehai Bio Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)11.4.4 Qingdao Kehai Bio Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Products Offered11.4.5 Qingdao Kehai Bio Related Developments11.1 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd11.1.1 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Corporation Information11.1.2 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Description and Business Overview11.1.3 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)11.1.4 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Products Offered11.1.5 Zhejiang Guoguang Biochemistry Co.,Ltd Related Developments

12 Future Forecast by Regions (Countries) (2021-2026)12.1 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Estimates and Projections by Region12.1.1 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast by Regions 2021-202612.1.2 Global Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast by Regions 2021-202612.2 North America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast (2021-2026)12.2.1 North America: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast (2021-2026)12.2.2 North America: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)12.2.3 North America: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast by Country (2021-2026)12.3 Europe Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast (2021-2026)12.3.1 Europe: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast (2021-2026)12.3.2 Europe: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)12.3.3 Europe: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast by Country (2021-2026)12.4 Asia Pacific Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast (2021-2026)12.4.1 Asia Pacific: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast (2021-2026)12.4.2 Asia Pacific: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)12.4.3 Asia Pacific: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast by Region (2021-2026)12.5 Latin America Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast (2021-2026)12.5.1 Latin America: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast (2021-2026)12.5.2 Latin America: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)12.5.3 Latin America: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast by Country (2021-2026)12.6 Middle East and Africa Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast (2021-2026)12.6.1 Middle East and Africa: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Sales Forecast (2021-2026)12.6.2 Middle East and Africa: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)12.6.3 Middle East and Africa: Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market Size Forecast by Country (2021-2026)

13 Market Opportunities, Challenges, Risks and Influences Factors Analysis13.1 Market Opportunities and Drivers13.2 Market Challenges13.3 Market Risks/Restraints13.4 Porters Five Forces Analysis13.5 Primary Interviews with Key Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Players (Opinion Leaders)

14 Value Chain and Sales Channels Analysis14.1 Value Chain Analysis14.2 Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Customers14.3 Sales Channels Analysis14.3.1 Sales Channels14.3.2 Distributors

15 Research Findings and Conclusion

16 Appendix16.1 Research Methodology16.1.1 Methodology/Research Approach16.1.2 Data Source16.2 Author Details16.3 Disclaimer

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Dibutyl Itaconate (CAS 2155-60-4) Market 2020- Analysis And In-Depth Research On Market Size, Trends, Emerging Growth Factors And Forecast To 2026 |...

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Is ATA Risk Stratification Still a Reliable Predictor of Response in DTC? – Targeted Oncology

Oncologists who specialize in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) commonly use the American Thyroid Association (ATA) 2015 guidelines for risk stratification in patients. A real-world study assessed the performance of this system in patients with DTC and discovered that the system is reliable for predicting short-term outcomes.

The ATA risk stratification system is a reliable predictor of short-term outcomes in patients with DTC in real-world clinical settings characterized by appreciable treatment-center heterogeneity in terms of size, location, level of care, diagnostic resources, and local management strategies, Durante et al concluded, in the paper.

A report published inThyroid provided prospective 1-year data from 2000 patients who were treated in the real-world across 50 centers throughout Italy. Patients were found in the Italian Thyroid Cancer Observatory, an online database governed by the Thyroid Cancer Center of the Sapienza University of Rome. To be selected for the study, each patient record was required to have a histological diagnosis of DTC, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), or poorly DTC and variants of these diseases. All patients were also required to have available information on treatment and pathological characteristics for investigators to determine their risk using the ATA risk stratification system. The third and final requirement was full information about each patients 1-year follow-up visit which was needed to estimate response to treatment.

Following the exclusion of 4610 cases from the database of 6867, the final cohort was compiled of 2071 patients from 40 centers. In 1109 patients (53.6%), the ATA risk of persistent and/or recurrent disease was classified as low, 796 patients (38.4%) were classified as intermediate risk, and 166 (8.0%) were classified as high risk.

Investigators led by Cosimo Durante, MD, found that in the overall population, 1576 patients (76.1%) had an excellent response, 376 (17.8%) had an indeterminate response, 33 (1.6%) had a biochemical incomplete responses, and structural incomplete responses were found in 86 patients (4.2%), which showed progressive increase with the baseline risk levels estimated as 1.5% in the low-risk patients, 5.7% in intermediate-risk patients, and 14.5% in high-risk patients. Prior treatment did impact responses to treatment at 1-year evaluation.

Of the patients with prior radioactive iodine remnant ablation, excellent responses were observed in 921 (77.3%), indeterminate responses were seen in 168 (14.1%), biochemical incomplete responses were observed in 33 (2.8%), and structural incomplete responses were observed in 69 patients (5.8%). Among those who had a total thyroidectomy, 655 (81.1%) had excellent responses, 137 (17%) had indeterminant responses, no patients had a biochemical incomplete response, and structural incomplete responses were seen in 15 patients (1.9%). Finally, among patients who had a thyroid lobectomy, 71 patients (97.3%) had an indeterminant response and 2 (2.7%) had a structural incomplete response. No patients in the thyroid lobectomy group had an excellent response or biochemical incomplete response.

A significant predictor of response to treatment was determined to be ATA risk class assigned at baseline, which was observed again at 1-year follow-up. There was no data for the low-risk group; however, the odds ratios (OR) for response to treatment in the intermediate-risk group was 4.67 (95% CI, 2.59-8.43;P<.0001). In the high-risk group, the OR was 16.48 (95% CI, 7.87-34.5;P<.0001). The results also showed a high probability of suboptimal response in patients classified as intermediate- to high-risk. Specifically, the OR that intermediate-risk patients would have a response to treatment was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.34-2.10;P<.0001). The OR that high-risk patients would respond was 3.23 (95% CI, 2.23-4.67;P<.0001).

Another assessment conducted during the study looked at how individual practice reporting impacted the performance of initial disease risk. The assessment included both academic and non-academic cancer centers. No impact was found.

Our findings demonstrate that the ATA risk stratification system for recurrent/persistent disease is indeed a reliable predictor at the 1-year follow-up evaluation, independent of treatment centers. This is true in spite of the fact that the likelihood of a less-than-excellent response varies across treatment centers, probably as a result of between-center differences in surgical volumes, case mixes, the availability of diagnostic tools, and/or other factors, wrote Durante et al.

Reference:

Durante C, Grani G, Zaelli MC, et al. Real-world performance of the American Thyroid Association risk estimates in predicting 1-year differentiated thyroid cancer outcomes: A prospective multicenter study of 2000 patients. Thyroid. Published online July 1, 2020. doi: 10.1089/thy.2020.0272

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Is ATA Risk Stratification Still a Reliable Predictor of Response in DTC? - Targeted Oncology

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Global Automated Biochemical Analyzers Market Size, Share, Trends, CAGR by Technology, Key Players, Regions, Cost, Revenue and Forecast 2020 to 2025 -…

The research report on Automated Biochemical Analyzers market comprises of insights in terms of pivotal parameters such as production as well as the consumption patterns alongside revenue estimations for the projected timeframe. Speaking of production aspects, the study offers an in-depth analysis regarding the manufacturing processes along with the gross revenue amassed by the leading producers operating in this business arena. The core objective of the Automated Biochemical Analyzers market report is to help organizations gain aa better understanding of this business sphere in terms of the key growth drivers, restraints, and opportunities influencing the market dynamics.

According to the report, the market is projected to expand with a CAGR of XX% over the review period 2020-2025.

In the midst of the lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, several industries have been forced to halt their operations which has dealt a major blow to their revenues. Some of them are projected to face challenges even after the economy recovers.

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Majority of businesses have realigned their priorities and revised their budget to ensure profitability in the forthcoming years. Our all-inclusive analysis of this industry suggests reliable strategies to help you draft a strong action plan for the future.

Further, the research report forecasts revenues and assesses the trends of each sub-market to identify the prospects of this market.

Major highlights of the Automated Biochemical Analyzers market report:

Automated Biochemical Analyzers Market segments covered in the report:

Regional segmentation: North America (United States, Canada and Mexico), Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy), Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia and Australia), South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia) and Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa).

Product categories:

Market share of each product type based on their sales and revenue.

Application spectrum:

Competitive outlook:

Basic company details, manufacturing sites, and competitors of each company

Highlights of the Report:

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Impossible Foods CEO on finding meat’s magical ingredient, pitching VCs and convincing meat-loving chefs to serve a vegan burger – CNBC

In 2011, at the age of 57, Stanford biochemistry professor Pat Brown took a leap faith and quit his job to launch plant-based "meat" company Impossible Foods. He did it because wanted to help solve one of the world's biggest problems before he retired.

"The use of animals as a technology in food production is, by a huge margin, the most destructive technology on earth in the history of our species," Brown tells CNBC Make It.

Today, Impossible Foods, best known for its juicy, meat-tasting vegan burger, is valued at more than $4 billion. Its burgers are served in more than 17,000 restaurants worldwide, including via partnership deals withBurger King, White Castle and Starbucks. It's also sold in8,000 grocery stores,

Here, Brown talks withCNBC Make It about his life before Impossible Foods, his first investor pitch meeting and where he sees the brand going. The interview has been edited together for length and clarity.

CNBC Make It: Today, you are the founder of Impossible Foods. But talk to me about life before Impossible Foods.

Pat Brown: I grew up assuming that I ever did about 50% of my childhood was in the Washington, D.C. suburbs and the other 50% was split in Paris [France] and in Taipei [Taiwan]. And I wasn't a very good student. I was capable, but I had very little interest in school. Fortunately, when it was time for me to go to college [in the 1980s], it was a time when the fraction of people who tried to go to college was a lot lower. So I was able to get into the University of Chicago, which is where I went for undergrad and then I stayed there for my M.D. and Ph.D. [in biochemistry].

I wanted to have more of tangible impact on the world ... so I decided to go into biomedical research. And then I did a pediatrics residency, so I spent three years as a pediatrician in Chicago, at Children's Memorial Hospital. I'd have a 36-hour non-stop day. But I loved it because you felt every moment like you were helping people.

Let's move forward to 2009. You were 57 and a professor at Stanford Medicine, Stanford University's medical school, and you took a sabbatical. How did that lead to the creation of Impossible Foods?

I used the [sabbatical] to try to figure out, what's the most important problem in the world is that I might be able to contribute to solving? The use of animals as a technology in food production is, by a huge margin, the most destructive technology on Earth in the history of our species. And once I realized that, it was a no-brainer.

Relatively quickly it became clear that you are not going to solve the [meat consumption] problem by regulation, education or trying to persuade people. Even most environmentalists that go to climate and environmental conferences are eating steak for dinner. They're not going to stop eating foods that are a big source of pleasure in their daily lives.

So that meant that the only way to solve the problem is to understand what consumers love about these foods and do a better job of delivering it than the current industry does. That means competing in the marketplace and pulling the economic rug out from under that industry. I had to start a company to make those changes and that's why I founded Impossible Foods.

What was your first pitch to get funding for Impossible Foods like?

You can't walk a block in Palo Alto [California, where Stanford is located] without tripping over a venture capitalist. I went to talk to three of the big VC firms but I was naive about what drives venture investors. It's not the same thing that drives me, it turns out.

The message that really snapped them to attention is that the there was, at that time, a $1.5 trillion global market being served by a technology [meat production] that has fundamentally not been improved since prehistoric times. And it's just waiting to be taken down by better technology.

But that was kind of like my last [pitch deck] slide. Now, I am much more upfront about this, saying that is a humongous prize for whoever can develop the technology to replace animals in the food system.

How did you create the Impossible Burger?

The premise was this is a scientific problem. We needed to understand in molecular detail how meat works.

From a nutritional standpoint, the problem was already solved [by plant-based] protein. Just to put it in perspective, the global soybean crop occupies .8% of Earth's land area and produces 150% as much protein as in all the meat consumed globally. And it uses way less fertilizer, pesticides and water than the animal agriculture industry. And it's cheaper by far.

The unsolved problem is deliciousness. So we had to study: What makes meat delicious?

We hired molecular biologists, biochemist, biophysicist and basic scientists because the the problem was not making food. It was understanding how this particular food works to create those emergent properties that people crave. So, they got started working on understanding what makes meat delicious.

And how did you find the magic ingredient, heme?

When you cook meat some kind of magical happens there's an explosion of aroma and it's flavor profile becomes completely different. When you have an explosion of chemical activity like that, to me that suggests that there was a catalyst in there.

What I knew was that heme besides being the molecule that carries oxygen in your blood making it red is one of the best catalysts in nature. And it's staring right at you, because it's responsible for the red or pink color of meat. So, it's just screamingly obvious.

You can basically take vegetable broth but if you throw in heme, it tastes like meat.

When you first introduced Impossible Burger, why did you market it to restaurants as opposed to consumers?

We debuted it with a handful of world renowned, uncompromising chefs, the first of which was Dave Chang, who once made a big splash by banning on principle every vegetarian item from his menu. So this guy is a meat guy to the bone, and the perfect person for us to launch with. Someone like Dave Chang, Traci Des Jardins, Brad Farmer and Chris Cosentino, these very meat-focused chefs, wanted it on their menus. So you would be insane not to take advantage of that.

Where do you see Impossible Foods going?

I think last year we increased our sales by about threefold. This year, it's very likely to be more than twofold. In order to achieve our mission[to eliminate the need to make food from animals], we have to grow on average about twofold every year for the next 15 years.

More than 90% of the people who ever want impossible burger are current meat eaters. We need to convince them to try [Impossible Burger]. Once we do that, I think we're in.

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Impossible Foods CEO on finding meat's magical ingredient, pitching VCs and convincing meat-loving chefs to serve a vegan burger - CNBC

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